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gruffydd

Marc Coleman Advocates Multi-Generational Morgages...

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Just stumbled across this bloke after reading his pro-Thatcher piece. The more I read...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Coleman

In 2007 he published The Best is Yet to Come. The book forecast the continued growth in the Irish economy as well as a sustainable construction Industry for the years ahead. As of 2011, Ireland was in deep recession with the virtual collapse of the construction Industry, rising unemployment and zero growth rate throughout the economy. On his late night talk show, "Coleman at Large", he has repeatedly stated that his predictions are still valid and that he is looking forward to 2020. He has not expanded on this opinion. Late in 2009, Coleman published "Back from the Brink" in which Coleman prescribed policies that he argued would accelerate economic recovery in Ireland and the world, largely identical with the policies he had advocated before the economic collapse. One of these policies included multi-generational mortgages as a way to spread Ireland's debt burden over time.

<<<<Couldn't really make this up!

Edited by gruffydd

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Just stumbled across this bloke after reading his pro-Thatcher piece. The more I read...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Coleman

In 2007 he published The Best is Yet to Come. The book forecast the continued growth in the Irish economy as well as a sustainable construction Industry for the years ahead. As of 2011, Ireland was in deep recession with the virtual collapse of the construction Industry, rising unemployment and zero growth rate throughout the economy. On his late night talk show, "Coleman at Large", he has repeatedly stated that his predictions are still valid and that he is looking forward to 2020. He has not expanded on this opinion. Late in 2009, Coleman published "Back from the Brink" in which Coleman prescribed policies that he argued would accelerate economic recovery in Ireland and the world, largely identical with the policies he had advocated before the economic collapse. One of these policies included multi-generational mortgages as a way to spread Ireland's debt burden over time.

<<<<Couldn't really make this up!

Multi-Generational Mortgages!! This man is a loon! He cannot seriously advocate something so stupid. The only possible effect would be to gradually push up prices again until the buffer is reached. We need to control prices by using lending policy, building policy and even rental policy to promote sustainable price structures. Germany have managed it. Why can't we?

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Just stumbled across this bloke after reading his pro-Thatcher piece. The more I read...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Coleman

In 2007 he published The Best is Yet to Come. The book forecast the continued growth in the Irish economy as well as a sustainable construction Industry for the years ahead. As of 2011, Ireland was in deep recession with the virtual collapse of the construction Industry, rising unemployment and zero growth rate throughout the economy. On his late night talk show, "Coleman at Large", he has repeatedly stated that his predictions are still valid and that he is looking forward to 2020. He has not expanded on this opinion. Late in 2009, Coleman published "Back from the Brink" in which Coleman prescribed policies that he argued would accelerate economic recovery in Ireland and the world, largely identical with the policies he had advocated before the economic collapse. One of these policies included multi-generational mortgages as a way to spread Ireland's debt burden over time.

<<<<Couldn't really make this up!

Ierland`s feeling the pain like the day after the nigh before this will never happen, they can see the error of thier ways but only after the self inflicted pain of the night before

Edited by long time lurking

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How does someone not yet born (or of age) enter into a binding contract? Answer - they don't.

Ofc, that doesn't stop the state doing the same damn thing, year after year. Hell, even those of age don't get a choice about that either.

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I guess its one way of solving the western below replacement rate breeding crisis. Breed some future debt slaves or we wont give you a mortgage!

Just wait till Balls-Up renames it the 'social mortgage' and starts pimping it over here.

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Just to add a note of realism and caution here, "multigenerational mortgages" were de-riegur back in the long centuries of european civilisation prior to the industrial revolution.

Question is, is it "different this time"? If its not, and growth is a dead concept, as many here seem to think might be the case, then intergenerational mortgages are not a surprising feature of the new normal.

Just saying.

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No. Theyre simply the result of government force creating scarcity. Quality of life is falling and falling for one reason only, the existence of government.

THat's one position to take. No doubt a good number of peasants from the middle ages would have agreed with you.

The reality is, there is scarcity, there always is. Thats why all the mainstream suspects are so obsessed with growth - it means that we don't all have to play a zero sum game and everyone can get a little upside.

You can believe we are all, in reality, completely unconstrained with regard to the underlying energy budget we all have to spend if you like but I suggest that this is a pointless fantasy.

I for one, don't believe in such fairy tales. THis is not to say that current policy is correct, fair or sensible - I for one don't think it really is.

But it is dishonest for 'opposition figures' such as yourself to pretend that if an alternative approach were taken we'd all go back, after a cathartic purge, to playing a nice positive sum game ad infinitum, or at least until some dufus messed up policy again.

A genuine opposition figure would outline how, in a zero sum or negative sum game, policy should be conducted to make the best of a poor situation in terms of fairness and in terms of long term outcomes and in terms of generally holding things together so as to benefit joe bloggs. But no, you prefer to take opposition to be the projection of dishonest fantasies.

Much like the labour party are now doing with their anti-austerity spending shift. Darling et all are right to criticise this new lurch to the left by Milliband and Balls, because behind it is an empty faith that such policy will work magic.

I don't see that your protestations are any different, except for the fact that they are presumably emanating from a position somewhere to the right of Millpede et al.

So, how to deal with zero sum games then - without simply wishing them out of existence? Surely you can do better than Labour on this question?

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Would not surprise me.....who cares how long the debt lasts as long as the monthly repayments are affordable........renting with the responsibility and without the flexibility....but having the inflation you can cash in on, spend and pass on to the next generation.....who would have thought of that now. ;)

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More clutching at straws.

There was some house price ramping, involving predicted intergenerational mortgages, in 2006 or 2007. I remember a wide boy estate agent phoning me to suggest that I should "buy now as house prices are about to soar" due to the new intergenerational mortgages. Of course, nothing came of it and house prices continued to fall.

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Multi-generational mortgages are probably the closest thing to slavery I can think of.

I am sure this lunatic would also advocate a state stake in the mortgage as well.

Why not?

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You could also argue that maybe just maybe this could make people more responsible knowing that their was no respite in death and your beloved offspring would inherit your debt.

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So, how to deal with zero sum games then - without simply wishing them out of existence? Surely you can do better than Labour on this question?

With regards to energy, well. the government could directly invest in building the infrastructure we require. At the moment we seem obsessed with 'leave it to the market' regardless of consequences. The aim of energy policy should be to make energy very cheap and very available, so that the rest of the economy sees lower costs.

I favor a mix largely based on Nuclear plants to achieve this, these are capital intensive but since the government can borrow money for very little right now, that does not seem a problem.

As far as housing goes.. borrowing money to build a proper amount of housing should be essentially self-funding through lower housing benefit and lower unemployment; bringing house prices down would be an obvious benefit.

Our road and rail networks could also do with a bit of upgrading.

In many ways we are better off than countries like Spain, because we have had no construction boom over the last decade. Building stuff should have positive effects.

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With regards to energy, well. the government could directly invest in building the infrastructure we require.

Well yes they could, but what if those investments do not yield as much energy as went in to build them?

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Well yes they could, but what if those investments do not yield as much energy as went in to build them?

Not quite sure what you mean by that. Only power stations yield energy, right? You mean the consumption of energy relative to its usefulness? How would you define this.

Surely what it all comes down to is the implementation of renewables and the import of renewable energy, which is the only method of sustainable existence (depending on the length of the timeline considered). You appear to assume that the UK has no room for growth, which I find puzzling given the clear issues in terms of infrastructure, the projected population growth and so on. I find much of your commentary interesting but I mainly see it as explaining countries such as Japan and the likely progress of peak population countries. I am less convinced it explains the UK, US etc or points to their likely future.

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Just to add a note of realism and caution here, "multigenerational mortgages" were de-riegur back in the long centuries of european civilisation prior to the industrial revolution.

Question is, is it "different this time"? If its not, and growth is a dead concept, as many here seem to think might be the case, then intergenerational mortgages are not a surprising feature of the new normal.

Just saying.

Mortgages for who? The serfs, i.e. those whose lot was little different to that of a slave?

Not trolling. Genuinely curious as to what you mean.

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With regards to energy, well. the government could directly invest in building the infrastructure we require. At the moment we seem obsessed with 'leave it to the market' regardless of consequences. The aim of energy policy should be to make energy very cheap and very available, so that the rest of the economy sees lower costs.

I favor a mix largely based on Nuclear plants to achieve this, these are capital intensive but since the government can borrow money for very little right now, that does not seem a problem.

As far as housing goes.. borrowing money to build a proper amount of housing should be essentially self-funding through lower housing benefit and lower unemployment; bringing house prices down would be an obvious benefit.

Our road and rail networks could also do with a bit of upgrading.

In many ways we are better off than countries like Spain, because we have had no construction boom over the last decade. Building stuff should have positive effects.

So do like Spain has been doing over the last 15 years, because it's basically an open goal for economic prosperity, yet we're better off than them for having not done it? Your Keynesian logic is so much better than traditional Earth logic.

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More clutching at straws.

There was some house price ramping, involving predicted intergenerational mortgages, in 2006 or 2007. I remember a wide boy estate agent phoning me to suggest that I should "buy now as house prices are about to soar" due to the new intergenerational mortgages. Of course, nothing came of it and house prices continued to fall.

If intergenerational mortgages were ever going to take of it would have been at that point in time

Edited by long time lurking

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You could also argue that maybe just maybe this could make people more responsible knowing that their was no respite in death and your beloved offspring would inherit your debt.

and your asset....one designed to last a mere 60 years.

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Just stumbled across this bloke after reading his pro-Thatcher piece. The more I read...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Coleman

In 2007 he published The Best is Yet to Come. The book forecast the continued growth in the Irish economy as well as a sustainable construction Industry for the years ahead. As of 2011, Ireland was in deep recession with the virtual collapse of the construction Industry, rising unemployment and zero growth rate throughout the economy. On his late night talk show, "Coleman at Large", he has repeatedly stated that his predictions are still valid and that he is looking forward to 2020. He has not expanded on this opinion. Late in 2009, Coleman published "Back from the Brink" in which Coleman prescribed policies that he argued would accelerate economic recovery in Ireland and the world, largely identical with the policies he had advocated before the economic collapse. One of these policies included multi-generational mortgages as a way to spread Ireland's debt burden over time.

<<<<Couldn't really make this up!

Well................ he's Irish after all....... :rolleyes:

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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