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SarahBell

Camping Basics

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Me and Mr Bell are planning a camping trip later in the year.

Last time I went camping I was in the guides.

So we have:

tent, sleeping bags, air bed (and pump),

What else will we need?

Something to cook on and a flask for saving hot water in have been recommended.

Camp site allows fires.

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Me and Mr Bell are planning a camping trip later in the year.

Last time I went camping I was in the guides.

So we have:

tent, sleeping bags, air bed (and pump),

What else will we need?

Something to cook on and a flask for saving hot water in have been recommended.

Camp site allows fires.

Depends where you are going.

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Depends where you are going.

The UK. Shropshire.

I am expecting it to be bloody freezing.

There's a pub very close that does food at lunch and tea so I guess cooking properly outside isn't a must. :)

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If the campsite has electricity then an electric coolbox is good. Barbecue, you can also get electric which aren't bad for grilling. Kettle and if you drink coffee then filter papers and the plastic holder to stick over your cup gives a bit of luxury. Folding chairs or a blanket for sitting on to enjoy the chilled wine from the coolbox.

If you're going to get a stove then a Trangia is good for two people. It's not as quick as some of the gas or petrol stoves but is easier.

I've got used to a bit more luxury than previously when I'd only take the minimum for trekking in the wilds.

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Me and Mr Bell are planning a camping trip later in the year.

Last time I went camping I was in the guides.

So we have:

tent, sleeping bags, air bed (and pump),

What else will we need?

Something to cook on and a flask for saving hot water in have been recommended.

Camp site allows fires.

Regular air beds aren't that warm in practice. There's a big chunk of air underneath you which conducts heat away from your back. That's why most backpackers use foam mats - thin ones or the snazzy type that puff up a bit when you open a valve

For cooking I usually use a Trangia or small portable fire box I can burn twigs in. However, for one-off or occasional trips a regular gas cannister stove is probably the way to go. Cooking on a Trangia is a bit of an art.

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These solid fuel stoves are very cheap small and easy to use.gelert-solid-fuel-camping-stove-1.jpg

You are not going to be cooking much on them. But for boiling water or making noodles etc - they do a fine job.

A few headtorches are extremely useful too.

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Regular air beds aren't that warm in practice. There's a big chunk of air underneath you which conducts heat away from your back. That's why most campers used foam mats - thin ones or the snazzy type that puff up a bit when you open a valve

For cooking I usually use a Trangia or small portable fire box I can burn twigs in. However, for one-off or occasional trips a regular gas cannister stove is probably the way to go. Cooking on a Trangia is a bit of an art.

Have been told to get mats for under it and quilts on top. Taking a big car so plenty of room for stuff.

Was just musing over how useful a stovey thing might be for my allotment. :)

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The UK. Shropshire.

I am expecting it to be bloody freezing.

There's a pub very close that does food at lunch and tea so I guess cooking properly outside isn't a must. :)

Get a transit van, drive it to a camping shop and then buy everything..

More seriously.. make a mental list of everything you picture yourself doing on the trip and work out what you'll need to do it. And make sure you have far too much bedding.

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The UK. Shropshire.

I am expecting it to be bloody freezing.

There's a pub very close that does food at lunch and tea so I guess cooking properly outside isn't a must. :)

Well, you'll probably spend the evenings in the pub then.

Depends how basic you need to be and how long you're camping.

Really you just need breakfast. So you need a simple stove, pan to boil water, coffee or teabags, milk, few packets of oats so simple, and a spoon.

But then I tend to rely upon stuffing mix, porridge oats, good old gorp, and salami when back country camping.

You could make up some gorp if you're going on walks and take some hot chocolate for night times.

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Me and Mr Bell are planning a camping trip later in the year.

Last time I went camping I was in the guides.

So we have:

tent, sleeping bags, air bed (and pump),

What else will we need?

Something to cook on and a flask for saving hot water in have been recommended.

Camp site allows fires.

rehearse putting the tent up before you go.

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Have been told to get mats for under it and quilts on top. Taking a big car so plenty of room for stuff.

Was just musing over how useful a stovey thing might be for my allotment. :)

I use a Trangia on mine sometimes. They're quite expensive if you not a dedicated backpacker. Car boot-packers have less need for all the lightweight pots that come in the sets.

Some people don't like the smell of meths, plus Trangias run out of fuel after 20 minutes or so and the flame isn't that easy to regulate. They have their plus points but I don't think they apply to your situation.

A compact gas stove would get my vote plus maybe a lightweight, camping kettle for use in the lottie as well. A household, stove top kettle would be fine but the heavier and larger it is the more gas it will take to heat it up.

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rehearse putting the tent up before you go.

Now this is a very good idea.

Its like changing a car tire. First time you do it - somehow manager to be a total mare.

After that first time though - doddle.

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I spend probably a month or so on the road each summer/autumn, in and around Europe, on the motorbike.

This is the single best piece of kit you can have.

col533b705.jpg

Nothing comes close. You can also get the dual cooker model, but make sure its can burn petrol.

White fuel and butane are nowhere near as hot.

Next, get a battery operated pump for your air bed.

Final, get a good head lamp.

Oh, and keep an old plastic milk jug in the tent to save the midnight trek to the pee place.

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Have been told to get mats for under it and quilts on top. Taking a big car so plenty of room for stuff.

that room soon goes.

get some decent thick socks.

camp chairs and table

a roll mat, useful for sitting on if you need to sit on the ground to remove boots etc, and for putting a the end of your bed to put your feet on when you have no shoes on

2 x Torches (one each). DO NOT buy rechargeable ones. as they have a built in battery that sometimes can not be removed. get a normal battery, but use rechargeable AA or AAA's, and get a car charger for the batteries. as if your batteries die, you can as a last resort buy batteries for it. tey and get ones that match the batteries on your digital camera, then you have a set of rechargeable batteries for that as well.

also get a battery lantern, useful as it spreads the light sideways and down.

do you have a Go Outdoors place near by? they are a bit camping and outdoors place, lots of stuff for ideas.

i love camping

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rehearse putting the tent up before you go.

i do this every time i go camping. its to check everything is there and it working order.

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Something like this is handy when you're camping

http://www.campingworld.co.uk/Models.aspx?ModelID=9755&gclid=CLP0_qTL3rYCFRLLtAodYTgAKw&utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=UnitedKingdom

We used to keep it in the back of the car and make tea when we stopped at the services.

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i do this every time i go camping. its to check everything is there and it working order.

also helps to work out how to put the tent back in the tiny bag it came in.

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As an owner and connoisseur of a range of finely engineered camping stoves - Trangias, Colemans, Optimusses, it pains me to acknowledge the existence of the Yellowstone Portable Gas Stove - Black and Green, currently available from Amazon for £10.85 delivered

5znv52.jpg

Nasty, nasty mass-produced thing.

Most large supermarkets stock compatible cannisters.

For occasional boot-packing in sheltered camp sites it is, unfortunately, quite practical and cost-effective.

edit: ah, someone beat me to it

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The best mid-price head torch I'm aware of is the Alpkit Gamma @£15, though I preferred them when they were a few quid cheaper not that long ago.

At the lower end, I've bought a couple of these on ebay as gifts for just under £6. They took a few weeks arriving, won't last anywhere near forever but are good for the money and very bright

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Suggest you get at least two very strong tent pegs and a sturdy rubber/plastic mallet. There is nothing worse than arriving on a stony camping ground and find that you can't get the tent pegs in.

You can use one of the pegs to make holes for your normal pegs then use the two strong ones at either end of the tent to stop it blowing away if the wind gets up.

A long screwdiver with a 10mm shaft makes decent holes too.

Try not to pitch your tent in a gully, it always rains at the wrong time.

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rehearse putting the tent up before you go.

Been told this.

Its one that might be hard to fit back into the bag. But who knows! :)

that room soon goes.

get some decent thick socks.

camp chairs and table

a roll mat, useful for sitting on if you need to sit on the ground to remove boots etc, and for putting a the end of your bed to put your feet on when you have no shoes on

2 x Torches (one each). DO NOT buy rechargeable ones. as they have a built in battery that sometimes can not be removed. get a normal battery, but use rechargeable AA or AAA's, and get a car charger for the batteries. as if your batteries die, you can as a last resort buy batteries for it. tey and get ones that match the batteries on your digital camera, then you have a set of rechargeable batteries for that as well.

also get a battery lantern, useful as it spreads the light sideways and down.

do you have a Go Outdoors place near by? they are a bit camping and outdoors place, lots of stuff for ideas.

i love camping

Yes think there's one at the fort.

Got head torches galore here :)

:)

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There is a B&B close by apparently :)

Went to Decathlon (Stockport) the other week. Shitloads of camping stuff, looked alright. Tents seem so cheap nowadyas.

My 5 year old has had the dreaded "Dad, I want to go camping" conversation with me. I prefer camping when my more diehard friends (i.e. mugs) set up camp and volunteer to organise cooking and all that shit. All I need to do is bring some beer and wash some dishes. Winner.

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