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A Life Lived In Tiny Flats

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22152622

No real new information, but interesting all the same and worthy of media exposure. Some snippets below...

Research from the Royal Institute of British Architects (Riba) says that lack of space is the most common cause of dissatisfaction people cite in relation to their homes. Almost half of people surveyed (47%) said there wasn't enough space for furniture they owned' date=' 57% said there was not enough storage space and 28% felt they couldn't get away from other people's noise.

Riba cited research showing that new homes in Ireland, Holland and Denmark were respectively found to be 15%, 53% and 80% bigger than those in the UK.

Housebuilders reject the criticisms and claim that minimum space standards would push up house prices. "If you specify that rooms have got to be bigger then you will drive the price up," warns Steve Turner, from the Home Builders Federation.

[i']Nathan Drewett on living in a two-bedroom flat in Bath with his fiancee Ceri

New-build always looks very shiny with designer kitchens and bathrooms. It's only when you unpack that you realise there's nowhere to store things.

I had to give my CDs to my parents to look after and we sold our books. The bedroom was so small one of us had to sit on the bed if the other opened the cupboard.

It was like Tetris living, trying to fit things around other things. The living room and kitchen were open-plan and if I put on the extractor fan my partner couldn't hear the TV.

The soundproofing was terrible, you could hear the neighbours walking around two floors up. We had to wait for them to go to bed before we could sleep.

In January we moved to a 1930s semi-detached house. We've got rid of so much stuff that it looks cavernous.[/i]

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Lived in tiny flats whilst in STR mode. Does mean you can get on with other aspects of your life without being tied down to a large property.

As a minimallist, I'm not one to get attached to clutter and furniture. Though I know many flat owners that would make good secret hoarder footage with furniture piled three high.

The storage space isn't the problem, its the problem of people hanging on to tuppence worth of clutter.

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You may as well blame Argos as the housebuilders.

In my experience charity shops are the undoing of many cluttered homes, especially now they sell furniture. There should be a health warning put on these places as they lead to the extreme hoarder next door.

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Lived in tiny flats whilst in STR mode. Does mean you can get on with other aspects of your life without being tied down to a large property.

As a minimallist, I'm not one to get attached to clutter and furniture. Though I know many flat owners that would make good secret hoarder footage with furniture piled three high.

The storage space isn't the problem, its the problem of people hanging on to tuppence worth of clutter.

Sometimes their accumulated stuff is their security...but new builds can be far too small for ordinary family living, storage space is very inadequate.....at least in a house that hasn't been converted you have a loft to store sentimental stuff that you may one day need or read but forget you had it, then end up in the chucking it or someone else chucking it for you....... ;)

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I have to disagree that these problems are only the bastion only of modern domestic buildings, I live in a flat built in the 30's that has NO sound proofing and others living in similar age properties suffer from having to listen to their neighbours noise constantly too, the lack of space generally is also an issue with no real storage space, it has got to the stage we are looking to move this spring/summer just to get away from the feeling of claustrophobia!

I know of at least one family that has 4 young children and at least 3 adults living in a tiny 2 bedroom flat in my road, how they manage this I have no idea. I think the problem is that we have no council stock that would offer a family the type of accommodation they need so they are forced to live in cramped and unsuitable accommodation that would be fine for a young singleton or couple, but clearly not designed for families to live in. National and local governments need to start doing something about it before it gets even worse, the South East is becoming more and more crowded with no real solutions to peoples housing needs that are affordable to the average person. It is insane and completely criminal that this has been allowed to happen. <_<

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Sometimes their accumulated stuff is their security...but new builds can be far too small for ordinary family living, storage space is very inadequate.....at least in a house that hasn't been converted you have a loft to store sentimental stuff that you may one day need or read but forget you had it, then end up in the chucking it or someone else chucking it for you....... ;)

Hoarding is a form of mental illness.

It was ok for war era Britons who faced rations and complete breakdowns in the consumer supply chain.

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Living in small flats doesn't seem to be drowning the Swedes in depression.

Peoples expectations are just too damn high.

Logic error: "flat" does not automatically mean "tiny". My girlfriend's Portuguese family live in a flat which has about the same floor space as my British parents' detached house.

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Logic error: "flat" does not automatically mean "tiny". My girlfriend's Portuguese family live in a flat which has about the same floor space as my British parents' detached house.

True. 70's sand 80's era flats are pretty big.

Still, most flats are 'small' compared to a house.

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Still, most flats are 'small' compared to a house.

In the UK, yes, because most of the flats we have were built to house the poor. In other countries it's normal to raise a family in a flat, so they build flats big enough for families.

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True. 70's sand 80's era flats are pretty big.

Still, most flats are 'small' compared to a house.

Flats are fine if they are not high-rise style flats, say no more than four or five stories high, they are big enough and are built well enough...good sound and heat insulation...any lifts are well maintained and the communal areas inviting to enter (all this can add up to a tidy sum, so all occupants have to share in the cost of the upkeep) Often you find when flats are let out and there is a high turnover of tenants nobody has an interest or stake in seeing that this happens....any owners will see that the block is then downgraded, some will be left trapped unable to move, and if or when they can, can only sell to another BTLer. ;)

Edited by winkie

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Flats are fine if they are not high-rise style flats, say no more than four or five stories high, they are big enough and are built well enough...good sound and heat insulation...any lifts are well maintained and the communal areas inviting to enter (all this can add up to a tidy sum, so all occupants have to share in the cost of the upkeep) Often you find when flats are let out and there is a high turnover of tenants nobody has an interest or stake in seeing that this happens....any owners will see that the block is then downgraded, some will be left trapped unable to move, and if or when they can, can only sell to another BTLer. ;)

That works if you can stop from people shagging and having kids, or convince them to move out of the cities.

Otherwise you have to cram 'em in.

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That works if you can stop from people shagging and having kids, or convince them to move out of the cities.

Otherwise you have to cram 'em in.

Not if the flats are big enough..........it is the land that costs the money.

There is masses of empty office space in the city.....space that is not used for any purpose whatsoever. ;)

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Thinking of a recent episode of Come Dine with Me( Kensington and Chelsea special) the four singletons despite having dining rooms the size of broom cupboards.(presumably that is typical of London) are actually likely to be healthier than the average individual. Apparently the borough has the longest longevity in the UK. I suppose being rich also helps.

So maybe crammed living and poor health aren't necessarily linked.

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So maybe crammed living and poor health aren't necessarily linked.

Posh neighbourhoods don't have an Iceland or Farmfoods down the street, nor corners shops loaded with junkie's choice sweeties, fizzy juice and liquor behind steel bars.

Edited by cashinmattress

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I have to disagree that these problems are only the bastion only of modern domestic buildings, I live in a flat built in the 30's that has NO sound proofing and others living in similar age properties suffer from having to listen to their neighbours noise constantly too, the lack of space generally is also an issue with no real storage space, it has got to the stage we are looking to move this spring/summer just to get away from the feeling of claustrophobia!

A flat built in the 1930s or a house built in the 1930s converted into flats?

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I know of at least one family that has 4 young children and at least 3 adults living in a tiny 2 bedroom flat in my road, how they manage this I have no idea. I think the problem is that we have no council stock that would offer a family the type of accommodation they need so they are forced to live in cramped and unsuitable accommodation that would be fine for a young singleton or couple,

Bedroom 'tax' in theory is designed to free up such accommodation.

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Living in small flats doesn't seem to be drowning the Swedes in depression.

Their average dwelling size is bigger than ours.

We have the smallest homes in the entire developed world.

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Their average dwelling size is bigger than ours.

We have the smallest homes in the entire developed world.

If you encourage people into this country to live here you have to provide housing/health etc for them.....no good benefiting from not having to pay for their childhood or their education but happy to take their taxes from the work they do when young fit and able without providing for their future needs and offspring.....makes for us all having to pay the price. ;)

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A flat built in the 1930s or a house built in the 1930s converted into flats?

Its purpose built 2 up 2 down "maisonette" type housing. The street is full of them and they are not converted.

Bedroom 'tax' in theory is designed to free up such accommodation.

If that housing actually existed it would!

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The storage space isn't the problem, its the problem of people hanging on to tuppence worth of clutter.

pretty much

cheaper to chuck it than pay for extra space to stash it

even 50 years many people had virtually nothing

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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