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It seems that every time I move house/business or make any changes to the services i already have, you can guarantee that British Telecom will find some way of screwing it up.

It's incredible how a communications company can itself be so bad at communicating orders around its own departments.

It's not even an exaggeration. I can confidently say that 100% of my many interactions with BT have resulted in them ******ing something up.

They would never survive if they were a small/medium sized business.

Post your positive experiences of dealing with BT on this thread.

(goodbye thread)

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The best way to deal with them is hang up and call them again. Chances are the next operator is more clued up than the previous one.

At least that always worked for me.

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TalkTalk are even worse than BT, as mentioned at least with BT you can hang up and try someone else who may possibly have a clue but no such luck with TT.

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They're not as bad as NTL or Virgin or whatever they're called. That's no saying much of course.

Essentially your paying peanuts for a very sophisticated piece of technology in terms of speed, infinitiy at nearly 40mb for £18 a month or to put it another way one 20/100 mb line into a business would be approximately 50 whining residential clients for broadly the same engineering (bit more complex but not that much) why would you give great service to fickle and feckless end user customers?

Same with budget airlines when you see people complaining about anything and they have just flown 800 miles for £60

The public doesn't and won't pay for outstanding service so in general they get the service they deserve and the wages to link to another thread

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Essentially your paying peanuts for a very sophisticated piece of technology in terms of speed, infinitiy at nearly 40mb for £18 a month or to put it another way one 20/100 mb line into a business would be approximately 50 whining residential clients for broadly the same engineering (bit more complex but not that much) why would you give great service to fickle and feckless end user customers?

Same with budget airlines when you see people complaining about anything and they have just flown 800 miles for £60

The public doesn't and won't pay for outstanding service so in general they get the service they deserve and the wages to link to another thread

they used to charge that when the bandwidth was 28K.

Course, now, they have better protocols.

nothing at all to do with complex tech...

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Part of my job is to work with BT on telephony, like freephone numbers. Unless you have a really good account manager, you are uttely screwed. You have multiple departments, using different pkatforms and unless you know exactly where to go - you can have BT telling you "this telephone number is not BT" despite you knowing it's BT.

Anyway most if not all telco companies are horrendous , i wonder if it's cause there are so many legacy type systems or not. But in BT i suspect it's combined with its largeness.

(Verizon and Colt, Orange are also shit just for reference).

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One of the delights of high speed broadband in this country is that every council estate in the land is wired up with 60/120 Mb fibre optic broadband from NTL/Virgin. Yet businesses can't get it and are on appalling BT copper ADSL snooze band.

Company I deal with is desperate for decent broadband. The copper ADSL constantly disconnects, Infinity in "planned" for 2014. Virgin are in the same street but only the council estate nearby is wired up.

Needless to say most people get faster connections on their phones these days, than ADSL.

Can't quite understand quite why BT were forced to open up its copper network, yet NTL/Virgin were not forced to allow other operators to run services on the fibre optic network.

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Guest eight

One of the delights of high speed broadband in this country is that every council estate in the land is wired up with 60/120 Mb fibre optic broadband from NTL/Virgin. Yet businesses can't get it and are on appalling BT copper ADSL snooze band.

Company I deal with is desperate for decent broadband. The copper ADSL constantly disconnects, Infinity in "planned" for 2014. Virgin are in the same street but only the council estate nearby is wired up.

Needless to say most people get faster connections on their phones these days, than ADSL.

Can't quite understand quite why BT were forced to open up its copper network, yet NTL/Virgin were not forced to allow other operators to run services on the fibre optic network.

Yes, we are on Virgin (formerly NTL, formerly Comcast, remember them?) and it's nice to have. I'd have to think twice about moving house now if it meant going back to a BT line.

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Can't quite understand quite why BT were forced to open up its copper network, yet NTL/Virgin were not forced to allow other operators to run services on the fibre optic network.

It was (although no longer considered to be) a monopoly.

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As a residential customer I find Virgin's customer service to be good IF you speak to a UK call centre. Their overseas ones are appalling though.

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Essentially your paying peanuts for a very sophisticated piece of technology in terms of speed, infinitiy at nearly 40mb for £18 a month or to put it another way one 20/100 mb line into a business would be approximately 50 whining residential clients for broadly the same engineering (bit more complex but not that much) why would you give great service to fickle and feckless end user customers?

Same with budget airlines when you see people complaining about anything and they have just flown 800 miles for £60

The public doesn't and won't pay for outstanding service so in general they get the service they deserve and the wages to link to another thread

Same problem as I started a thread on courier companies about I suspect too. I would pay extra for a better service, but I think I'm in the minority. Having said that, NTL were particularly awful.

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It seems that every time I move house/business or make any changes to the services i already have, you can guarantee that British Telecom will find some way of screwing it up.

It's incredible how a communications company can itself be so bad at communicating orders around its own departments.

It's not even an exaggeration. I can confidently say that 100% of my many interactions with BT have resulted in them ******ing something up.

They would never survive if they were a small/medium sized business.

Post your positive experiences of dealing with BT on this thread.

(goodbye thread)

BT are awful, I am supposed to be relocating business premises today yet I still have no broadband connection at the new location, it's now 2 weeks late and counting. When they failed the on the 1st connection date they simply cancelled the order.. So now I'm stuck with having to pay an extra months rent on my current premises.

I also have a council estate next door that has fibre yet the business estate I will be on has to make do with 1-2meg.. I would love to meet the person who signed that one off

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I also have a council estate next door that has fibre yet the business estate I will be on has to make do with 1-2meg.. I would love to meet the person who signed that one off

Its partly legacy. The areas that have fibre now were the areas originally wired up for cable telly, originally by the likes of Rediffusion which had a contract at one time to supply cable tv to the "modern" housing estates of the time ( from the 1950's onwards).

With the demise of Rediffusion the coaxial system was gradually rewired, more recently with fibre.

When I lived in Leicester, with the demise of Rediffusion, Diamond cable took over the cable TV network, installed fibre, started running phone services as well as telly, offering more channels, and eventually broadband.

Most of the regional / local cable companies were acquired by NTL which eventually became Virgin Media.

So the areas with fibre now, tend to be those that were originally wired for cable telly.

Remembering Rediffusion:

http://www.rediffusion.info/

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TalkTalk are even worse than BT, as mentioned at least with BT you can hang up and try someone else who may possibly have a clue but no such luck with TT.

In my experience Talktalk have got better in recent years.

I've been with them since 2007, largely because their £20 a month subscription that includes unlimited inclusive calls to landlines in a list of around 40 countries does not come even close to being equalled by any other telecoms company (I spend around an hour a day on the phone to the US). In 2008 my broadband went down, and it was a ten-day, Kafka-esque nightmare even to get them to acknowledge that the fault was not with my equipment. In the end all they needed to do was to hit the reset button on a modem at the exchange.

Fast forward to last autumn, and some yobs took a chainsaw and chopped down the telegraph pole on the public footpath that runs alongside the bottom of my back garden, thereby disconnecting me and about six other properties. I reported it to Talktalk immediately, and a white van-load of Polish gentlemen were at the scene and starting the repair within three hours.

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What BT did right - the initial buyers buying it from the taxpayer with a Crown guarantee on its pensions, not just for current staff but future ones as well.

The main problem with it, is that it has the monopoly on fixed-line broadband in about half the country - the half which isn't cabled. Even in cabled streets you have a "duopoly" so there's some choice at least.

A faux-impression of choice is created at a retail level e.g. you can choose which name appears on your bill and indeed depending on the provider you may have slightly different tech at the exchange. For example, Talk Talk's network (C&W) is actually quite well regarded even thought the customer service is appalling.

However the major downfall of any broadband connection that runs over phone lines is that phone lines are appalling conductors of broadband signals when they're in perfect condition so now that some are getting on for a century old they are literally useless in many locations. All providers except VM (cable) and say Gigaclear (true fibre) or Hyperoptic (true fibre again) rely on BT's ancient old phone network with all its inherent issues. It is so very, very old, bits of it are literally crumbling away now.

Here is a case in point. OK, it's rural, we're 2.5km from the exchange and the line is physically 3.6km long yet the most it could manage was 1.5Mbps of throughput (2Mbps sync rate). We do however have choice and our home broadband is 3G based which outperforms ADSL by some margin...

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Even during the day it manages over 9 Meg just about all the time.

So our phone line has been sat rotting away unused for about five years.

If people had true choice in the matter then as someone said, BT would simply have died away years ago as a commercial irrelevance coupled with the world's most diabolical customer service and quite incredible serial idiocy.

Yes, Talk Talk are crap, too, but then the provision of their service relies on BT - bring those two together in combination and if you have a choice of that or nothing, for heaven's sake just take "nothing". It's much quicker and the result isn't much different.

The government's solution to break this stalemate and improve the frankly atrocious broadband in this country was to set a goal of 25Mbps+ for 90% of the population and 2Meg for 10%. Leaving aside that 2 Meg is barely even narrowband these days and 10Meg would have been a more appropriate basic service level, they then set about constructing a framework which basically gifted BT with a billion pounds of our money to entrench its monopoly position.

This strategy - if I can call it that - involves running fibre to the phone cabinets (some of them) and then using the existing old knackered copper and aluminium to connect the property. Even VM cable didn't do that years ago and went for co-ax. BT is so very, very far behind. This will supply speeds of between nil and 76Meg on a semi random basis depending on the length and quality of the knackered old phone line. It will get nowhere near the goals of the project, further entrench BT's monopoly, and result in a much higher total spend over time to bring this country up to scratch with the taxpayer being repeatedly "tapped" over the years.

So if you ever wondered why BT is so atrocious: put simply, it's because it can be.

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I thought directory enquiries were a rip off these days but.....

Vodafone hit me with a bill for £167 for four calls. I don’t understand why when I barely use my mobile phone. Can you help? P. O., Caernarfon.
Vodafone says the calls were made to the BT directory enquiries number 118500. This costs £2.39 a minute and has a 59p connection fee. If you ask to be put through to the number you were looking for, the call will continue to cost £2.39 a minute - one of your calls lasted over 39 minutes. However, as you were clearly unaware you were calling a premium rate number Vodafone has agreed to reduce your bill to £53.

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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