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happy_renting

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My daughter has been told by her GP to see a specialist, as she may need an MRI brain scan.

The GP is not arranging this for her.

When she rings the specialist to make an appointment, she is repeatedly told to call back in a couple of weeks because there is a waiting list.

So, records are not being properly kept of waiting times, as record is not being made of the attempts to even get on the waiting list.

This will result in reported waiting times being grossly understated. If one specialist can do it, perhaps the whole hospital, or hospital trust, is doing it.

If she isn't on a waiting list by tomorrow, I shall ask my MP to raise the matter with the relevant Minister.

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It's not often, but whenever I have any dealings with the NHS, I'm astonished at how rubbish it is.

As a patient, as a visitor and trying to do business with.

Nearly every developed country has a better health service than us. USA is always used as the comparison as it's such a mess (although extremely good for those that can pay).

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Any performance stats system that can be cooked will be cooked. In the public sector, the private sector, anywhere.

I regularly adjust the way I report/record what I do at work to make best use of the way the stats system works and make the stats look as impressive as possible. I bet that's true of most if not all people.

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It's not often, but whenever I have any dealings with the NHS, I'm astonished at how rubbish it is.

As a patient, as a visitor and trying to do business with.

Nearly every developed country has a better health service than us. USA is always used as the comparison as it's such a mess (although extremely good for those that can pay).

Proof? My dealings with the NHS have been positive and it's too big a organisation to properly gauge, also if the NHS is not deemed good enough, why do people in other countries use it (according to the Daily Wail)?

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It's a massive failing bureaucratic nightmare.

The only thing worse than how badly you get treated is the sudden reversal when everybody starts being overly nice. That's when you know you've got bad news coming.

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Proof? My dealings with the NHS have been positive and it's too big a organisation to properly gauge, also if the NHS is not deemed good enough, why do people in other countries use it (according to the Daily Wail)?

Just because other countries are worse, doesn't mean we're any good.

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Proof? My dealings with the NHS have been positive and it's too big a organisation to properly gauge, also if the NHS is not deemed good enough, why do people in other countries use it (according to the Daily Wail)?

Is this a joke? They use it because it's free (because we are mugs) and there isn't "free" healthcare in the 3rd world countries they come from.

If your choice is a free Robin Reliant or nothing you choose the Robin Reliant. It doesn't make the Robin Reliant anything other than a sh1t car.

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Have they killed off choose and book?

http://www.chooseandbook.nhs.uk/

Speak to the practice manager at the surgery.

Thanks for that, i've never heard of it before (thankfully I don't often need to arrange NHS appointments)

I'll get my daughter to use it tonight, as I don't know the specialist's name or exact title of his/her discipline

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Any performance stats system that can be cooked will be cooked. In the public sector, the private sector, anywhere.

I regularly adjust the way I report/record what I do at work to make best use of the way the stats system works and make the stats look as impressive as possible. I bet that's true of most if not all people.

Yup happens everywhere.

I once worked in a place with SLA targets of < 1 hour, < 1 day, < 1 week and <1 month

anything that took more than a month was just deleted from the stats because "that almost never happens"

You can guess what then happened to every job that would have taken more than a week or so

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I feel your frustration , my family have had good experiences up until now. My dad is terminally ill with the big C, and the care he is receiving now is appalling , he is on a waiting list, and going downhill rapidly, while the nurses do the minimum. My mum was reduced to tears yesterday by the doctor on the ward. A simple procedure should patch him up for the time being and he can go home, but instead, he's been on a waiting list for ten days and deteriorating rapidly. When you've only got 6 months to live this kind of takes the piss.

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Is this a joke? They use it because it's free (because we are mugs) and there isn't "free" healthcare in the 3rd world countries they come from.

If your choice is a free Robin Reliant or nothing you choose the Robin Reliant. It doesn't make the Robin Reliant anything other than a sh1t car.

Absolutely correct. In the vein of things, the OP should buy his daughter a scooter, or at least a bus ticket. It's not free, but that's the way things are.

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Thanks for that, i've never heard of it before (thankfully I don't often need to arrange NHS appointments)

I'll get my daughter to use it tonight, as I don't know the specialist's name or exact title of his/her discipline

Unfortunately not used much in many parts of the country although I hope that is not the case where you are. Many hospitals have thrown up barrier organisations in many departments, neurology being a prime choice, to once again circumvent the stats. E.g. "The Neurologist clinic is bookable on C&B but not by the patient/GP, you have to ring up the coordinator" ergo same loop happening.

Hope you get your daughter sorted soon, not all the NHS is crap.

Edit: In fact, given that your daughter is ringing up to try and book her appointment, this sounds exactly like what's happening.

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Who is your MP? Do you think they'll be able to help?

Richard Benyon. I've had correspondence with him before, he is generally quite good.

My daughter rang today and was told that she had been booked in... an appointment in 4 weeks time. From what I can get out of her, she has been trying to get the appointment for weeks already. Until the letter arrives, i won't know exactly what the appointment is for - to see a specialist (in what? neurology? opthalmology? ) or to get an MRI or CT scan.

She & I are in a private healthcare scheme, which may be a help if waiting times are too long... but I need more info from my daughter about what has been booked and when. Not as easy as you think, when it's a 21 year old in a grumpy mood....

Those here who are parents will know how I feel. You worry more about your kid's health than you do your own.

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My daughter has been told by her GP to see a specialist, as she may need an MRI brain scan.

The GP is not arranging this for her.

The GP may not be able to arrange this. MRI has historically been a highly specialist test, with a high price tag (no less than about £300 for a basic brain scan) and reports that may be difficult to interpret without expert background knowledge. Additionally, MRI equipment has a very large capital cost - no less than £1 million to install a general-purpose scanner, and the scanner will require approximately £200k per year in staffing costs and about £200k per year in maintenance. As a result, most hospitals are reluctant to increase MRI provision because it is very expensive, and because of the way the NHS is funded (which pays by number of diagnoses made and treatments given, and not by how the diagnosis was reached or what tests were performed). The result is that many hospitals have a blanket policy of no GP access to "specialist" tests, because they are already unable to manage the demand from their own specialists.

Personally, I don't see that such a blanket policy can be justified today. If the result of the MRI scan is difficult to interpret, it's pretty easy to send the result back to the GP stating that specialist advice is required and recommending an appropriate specialist. Similarly, it's much better use of a specialist consultant's time, if by the time of the clinic appointment, the key test has already been done.

However, by preventing direct access to GPs you add an obstacle to getting the appointment, and help keep waiting times down; so hospital managers love this type of policy, even if its a waste of time and effort for all the front-line staff involved.

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The GP may not be able to arrange this. MRI has historically been a highly specialist test, with a high price tag (no less than about £300 for a basic brain scan) and reports that may be difficult to interpret without expert background knowledge. Additionally, MRI equipment has a very large capital cost - no less than £1 million to install a general-purpose scanner, and the scanner will require approximately £200k per year in staffing costs and about £200k per year in maintenance. As a result, most hospitals are reluctant to increase MRI provision because it is very expensive, and because of the way the NHS is funded (which pays by number of diagnoses made and treatments given, and not by how the diagnosis was reached or what tests were performed). The result is that many hospitals have a blanket policy of no GP access to "specialist" tests, because they are already unable to manage the demand from their own specialists.

Personally, I don't see that such a blanket policy can be justified today. If the result of the MRI scan is difficult to interpret, it's pretty easy to send the result back to the GP stating that specialist advice is required and recommending an appropriate specialist. Similarly, it's much better use of a specialist consultant's time, if by the time of the clinic appointment, the key test has already been done.

However, by preventing direct access to GPs you add an obstacle to getting the appointment, and help keep waiting times down; so hospital managers love this type of policy, even if its a waste of time and effort for all the front-line staff involved.

Thanks Chumpus. My daughter has now learnt that her consultaion has been brought forward a couilpe of weeks, but she should originally have been able to see a consultant already by now. Only then will an MRI scan be considered (I am hoping that the consultant will expertly decide that no MRI scan is needed and that she is OK, of course).

I had a CT scan once - I volunteered for some research experiments. I got a picture of my brain as a souvenir.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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