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Turned Out Nice Again

Andrew Marr's Rowing Machine

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Caught him on TV today talking about his recent stroke.

He's lost motor function on his left side, particularly in his arm, although it looks like hs speech hasn't been affected

Interestingly, he's blaming HIT training and a rowing machine for what happened.

An object lesson for the over-50s?

' Marr explained he had fallen into the "terrible" trap of believing what he read in newspapers, which encouraged people to "take very intensive exercise in short bursts - and that's the way to health". '

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22141372

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So high intensity exercise gives you strokes ?

Not convinced.

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Stationary bike. Non-impact, easy on the knees, highly aerobic. Boring? Well sit it in front of the TV then.

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I only know two people under 50 who've had strokes, one was an extremely fit workmate had a massive stroke immediately after finishing a triathlon, the other had it as a side effect of some anti-smoking pills he was taking.

So you can overdo it.

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I only know two people under 50 who've had strokes, one was an extremely fit workmate had a massive stroke immediately after finishing a triathlon, the other had it as a side effect of some anti-smoking pills he was taking.

So you can overdo it.

Yeah, I know an under 45 stroke sufferer, super fit. She seems ok now after 2 years, but I doubt she'll ever return to the brain work she was doing before.

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I think the high intensity program is also a bad idea for untrained people as it convinces people who are really out of shape that they can do some good by flogging themselves half to death for 2 minutes every day. I think high intensity training does have its place if you are already reasonably fit and trying to get fitter.

I suppose some fat bods take comfort in things like this. I know one person who is fat who moans about a lot about anyone who does exercise. No doubt they think people would be better off 2 stone overweight sitting in a chair all day.

The key to everything is moderation. You should be exercising a few times a week and pushing the heart rate up, but not to the point where you are going to collapse !

Personally I think for a middle aged adult walking is not enough to do it unless you are power walking up hills but I guess something is better than nothing, especially as you get older.

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It's probably best to sit in a chair and imagine exercise! :huh:

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I had a stroke less than 3 weeks ago at Marr's age, I can even manage a bit of rumpypumpy! (as I discovered last night) Finding it difficult writing throught.

Main diagnosis...left parietal haemorrhage and other fukcups.

This will be a life changing experience for me.

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I had a stroke less than 3 weeks ago at Marr's age, I can even manage a bit of rumpypumpy! (as I discovered last night) Finding it difficult writing throught.

Main diagnosis...left parietal haemorrhage and other fukcups.

This will be a life changing experience for me.

Godspeed, CD.

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I think the high intensity program is also a bad idea for untrained people as it convinces people who are really out of shape that they can do some good by flogging themselves half to death for 2 minutes every day. I think high intensity training does have its place if you are already reasonably fit and trying to get fitter.

Yes, yes, yes.

High intensity intervals were invented by a guy (Tabata) looking to improve the performance of Olympic level speed-skaters. They are absolutely not suitable for people who aren't already very fit. The problem is the method is incredibly seductive because it promises great results with only a few minutes of exercise per day. Truth is most people just couldn't reach the intensity required to see the real benefits.

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I had a stroke less than 3 weeks ago at Marr's age, I can even manage a bit of rumpypumpy! (as I discovered last night) Finding it difficult writing throught.

Main diagnosis...left parietal haemorrhage and other fukcups.

This will be a life changing experience for me.

Sorry to hear that.

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I see Andrew Marr actually tore his caritoid artery whilst rowing on a machine at high intensity. I did not realise that this sort of injury was classified as a stroke. I can't believe anyone in the right mind would recommend placing a massive strain on an otherwise unfit body for 2 mins a day. No wonder something gave out; you don't start your car engine on a cold morning and rev the nuts off of it for 2 mins before the oil has warmed through and circulated....

You neeed to gradually work up to fitness and weight loss. I went from unfit and overweight to running marathons - but I took 7 years about doing it, with regular and gradually increasing exercise each week to a very loose plan which I changed and moved about (and even suspended) as I felt right. It was life-changing and the weight loss I scored has been no effort at all to keep off as I always viewed this as a change to lifestyle rather than a temporary diet, or something with an end point. I nicked the idea from how I gave up smoking in 2000 - sneek up on the problem slowly!

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Thanks chaps!

I should say that I got shifted into hospital from work in 30 mins witch was good and rapidly improved over the first 6 days.

No particular memorary loss or balance loss.

Please note...there are those that get off scott free and there are many who don't.

, you really have to be luckly.

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Sure you will be fine Mr dweller. What sort of advice do they give you now ?

Ps i may go to hell for this but i couldn't help but laugh at a few wee spelling mistakes you made - after talking about your stroke.

"Fukcups" was my favourite :D

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Sure you will be fine Mr dweller. What sort of advice do they give you now ?

Ps i may go to hell for this but i couldn't help but laugh at a few wee spelling mistakes you made - after talking about your stroke.

"Fukcups" was my favourite :D

There are 4 or 5 tests you can take all of which are inconclusive! I might just a well call the call the ambulance, it's rather like being drunk.

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I had a stroke less than 3 weeks ago at Marr's age, I can even manage a bit of rumpypumpy! (as I discovered last night) Finding it difficult writing throught.

Main diagnosis...left parietal haemorrhage and other fukcups.

This will be a life changing experience for me.

Good luck, mate.

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i've just been reading about ICAD (Interior Carotid Artery Dissection), which I must admit I had never heard of before Marr's experience.

It's worryingly commonplace (the most common cause of strokes under 50) and often strikes those who are physically fit.

http://www.medhelp.org/posts/Neurology/Interior-Carotid-Artery-Dissection--Who-Knows-Their-Stuff/show/369190?page=1

From the above thread, the message seems to be not to overdo exercise, especially if you are fighting an infection or feeling run down (which I think was Marr's condition at the time he succumbed).

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you don't start your car engine on a cold morning and rev the nuts off of it for 2 mins before the oil has warmed through and circulated....

my neighbour does, at 6am, before he goes to work

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It's probably best to sit in a chair and imagine exercise! :huh:

No, best is to watch moving images of other people exercising. Works for most people!

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Slightly off topic:

I've been training for a marathon (next week). Started in January having never really run before. Looked online and in books at various training plans and settled on the one that had me running 4 times a week (some went up to 6). Even 4 seemed odd, never a chance to recover etc, so ignored the plan and have averaged between once and twice a week.

People I know stuck to these stupid plans and told me I'd never finish. All injured. None are starting.

Even in the final week, they have 2-4 runs (not that short). It's crazy.

I'm confident, if a little anxious.

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Don't think 4 times a week is too much. Problem with the marathon training is the distances involved.

I really don't think a 3 or 6 months training plan for a distance of a marathon is sensible.

It takes a long time for your body to get used to running good distances.

I run 3 times per week. One longer up to ten k. The other two short intense speed or hill training.

I haven't had a running related injury in about 3 years.

My only injuries have been drink related :(:lol:

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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