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Where Is Better Than The Uk?!


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If they are young then language differences should not be seen as an obstacle. In fact the opportunity to learn a different language is a bonus. Madrid ticks b ), d), e) and f) these days, and maybe in a few years it'll tick c) as well (in fact there's still plenty of work around for English teachers)

I really liked Madrid, probably because it was really Spanish, unlike La Costa del Brits! :blink:;)

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The UK is not such a bad place to be.

All in I would tend to agree with that. I think there are always going to be transient differences between different developed countries but they tend to even out in the end. E.g. right now houses are stupidly expensive in the UK and there are relatively few jobs, but it would be a brave person that predicted that situation being the same in 10 years time. My advice on country moves is to do them for fun, adventure or because a good opportunity of some sort arises (work, love etc.) not because you don't like the place you live right now.

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I live in Spain. Very English speaking in many parts as said above. Housing is very cheap and there is well paid work (over the border in Gibraltar).

Weather, beaches, access to British supermarkets and shops, employment, and healthcare.

You do have to put up with poor customer service, sharing the roads with truly stunningly bad drivers, and police that you really want to avoid like the plague.

Living in Spain and working in Gibraltar is not the worst lifestyle around and covers a LOT of the bases you lot are looking for.

Edited by cica
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I had to chuckle at the first post - suggesting Sweden. I know the country well and still speak a bit of the lingo. It's just about the most "socialist" country in Europe, highly taxed but you get a lot of benefits for it. That would drive 50% of HPI devotees nuts on its own.

Yes, everyone speaks English and the big cities are quite cosmopolitan, but off the beaten track they all have 6 fingers and play banjos. Autumn and winter are miserable unless you are a skiing fan and even then, they're all grumpy because they don't get enough of the stuff.

No, it wouldn't be Sweden. If I wanted the expensive, outdoor living nanny state I'd go for Norway. More opportunities and far, far better scenery. Plus they didn't help the Germans in the war.

Denmark is good too, it's connected to mainland Europe, but once again, the marginal tax rates are wicked. I'd only consider non-Euro countries, so that's the only 3 worth a punt at this stage.

I'm typing this in Australia at the end of 5 weeks here and in New Zealand. The breakfast TV news is complaining about aveage house price of AU$ 537k (£383k) but they're crowing about morgage interest rates of only a smidge over 5% with the likelihood of a drop because the economy is slowing. The guy on the hotel door is a brummy, was a brickie, came over a year ago but is amazed at the money, opportunities and lifestyle here in Sydney, where the cost of food and eveything else is making my eyes bleed. Australia has a trade defecit which is causing worries and they are harnessed to the Chinese bandwagon - if that goes off the rails Oz is stuffed big style.

New Zealand was much, much cheaper (apart from Auckland). Relaxed lifestyle, laconic humour, similar sh!tty climate to what we are accustomed to (except fo the worst drought in 70 years on the north island). But the opportunities are less - any Kiwi with any drive goes to Oz.

If I was in my 20's it would be Oz. If I was in my 30s and not wanting to chase anything with a pulse, it would be NZ.

But if I wanted to be somewhere where hard work was respected and rewarded plus I didn't want to make my living in finance just stealing money frorm other people - I'd be in Germany. The language is easy to learn (especially if you are a northerner). They don't have the manners of a warthog like the Chinese and Russians. They love the brits (generally). And hard work will get you a very good lifestyle.

I did say non-Euro countries. German membership is only a temporary abberation and once the D-Mark is back they'll be roaring away.

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By the way, when reading foreign property portals has anyone ever managed to work out what a duplex means? It stumps me every time!

Here in Canada, it seems to be the equivalent of semi-detached; two houses joined at one wall.

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Japan

Hear me out :lol:

costs are the same as UK, but generally a higher standard of living , yeh, pockets of failed salarymen living in cardboard boxes, blah, blah, but that image as true as it is has more to do about the enormous price the Japanese pay for actually giving a toss about each other not just their own families.

The cities are well oiled machines, but the real prize in Japan is the countryside, it's undeveloped, uncared for, unloved by 90% of Japanese which mean property is cheap, land cheap, the scenery stunning, people very friendly

If you can learn the language there are opportunities in teaching, you don't really need to be fluent either, just the basics, you will earn enough to live well

Edited by sammysnake
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OK more moaning on here and elsewhere about the state of the UK, especially in regard to the younger generation. ie debt for going to college, impossibly high house prices, high energy prices, youth unemployment etc etc etc

So I got to thinking if I was to advise my kids (now 9&11!) where to go where would I tell them??!

As I have relatives in the states they could move there............ cheaper houses, but too many guns and not sure with their pre existing medical conditions that they would ever get medical insurance.

So list of criteria is:

a) English speaking? (Only due to laziness!! So not totally important.)

B) State funded healthcare

c) Good job prospects

d) Reasonable House Prices

e) Reasonable cost of living

f) Niceish environment

We live in Edinburgh so I would say we do ok for a (well scottish!!), b and f but not sure about c, d and e

Don't rule out the States. Yes, there are guns, but outside of the headlines, that's not going to affect your day to day life

And the new Obamacare rules mean that companies HAVE to give affordable healthcare to those with pre-existing medical conditions.

Please remember that the NHS is not free. You pay for it, and you pay for all the inefficiency, backhanders and poor management that comes with it.

I've been living in CA for 2.5 years now, and my quality of life is way, way above what it was in London.

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I'm a Canadian citizen with a British passport. I live here...but I could live there.

Bottom line, if you've got money they're both great places to live, if you haven't they're not.

If you haven't, the choice is a no brainer....NHS and welfare. Party on the Med. and come home when the money runs out and the health insurance is invalid. As thousands do every year.

Edited by crashmonitor
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I'm a Canadian citizen with a British passport. I live here...but I could live there.

Bottom line, if you've got money they're both great places to live, if you haven't they're not.

True.

But the question is, in which country a life of work will bring you the best rewards? And give your children the best chances?

IMHO it depends. For those who prefer to work and be self reliant, I think the answer is the USA. No welfare state though. Not even paid holidays (usually 1 weeks/year if you are an employee, 2 at most). But work pays very well, and cost of living is very low, including housing (bar a few big cities like NYC and Boston). And IMO, due to energy policy and low energy costs, the next decades will see the USA economy growing strongly again. Europe on the other hand...

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But the question is, in which country a life of work will bring you the best rewards? And give your children the best chances?

Interesting statement........rewards can mean different things to different people........the best chances for children depends on the parents the children were born to and how well the children use their intelligence and the opportunities that they will come across throughout their lives.... ;)

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OP assumes state funded healthcare will continue in the UK. If current policies continue, it won't.

For your (our) kids, I'd be far less concerned about housing, jobs etc and far more concerned about food/water/resource security.

Not having a well paid job/expensive house is one thing, not having access to food is something else entirely.

That's where the world's most likely headed.

So, somewhere where crops can still be grown, secure water (and energy) supply and they'll let you in/remain.

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OK more moaning on here and elsewhere about the state of the UK, especially in regard to the younger generation. ie debt for going to college, impossibly high house prices, high energy prices, youth unemployment etc etc etc

So I got to thinking if I was to advise my kids (now 9&11!) where to go where would I tell them??!

As I have relatives in the states they could move there............ cheaper houses, but too many guns and not sure with their pre existing medical conditions that they would ever get medical insurance.

So list of criteria is:

a) English speaking? (Only due to laziness!! So not totally important.)

B) State funded healthcare

c) Good job prospects

d) Reasonable House Prices

e) Reasonable cost of living

f) Niceish environment

We live in Edinburgh so I would say we do ok for a (well scottish!!), b and f but not sure about c, d and e

(Western) Germany for me. Apart from (a), it ticks all the boxes. It's also:

g) Largely Brit-friendly (and Brummie-friendly; no accent snobbery to counter!)

h) Not too far away to pop back and visit relatives

I spent 10 years in Germany and can speak the lingo pretty well now, so that's not such a big problem. Assuming things don't change radically, we'll be off back over there when my lad (who also speaks some German) reaches 18 to take advantage of the free further education system. No point in paying £27K+ if you don't need too!

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I heard properties there are even more expensive than in Britain, and much more, no?

Very true.

But my employer would more than cover my living expenses, and in 2 years I'll probably have enough cash to buy a house in the UK.

It's a very subjective point, of course.

If I had to pay myself, I wouldn't go.

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UK has its shit holes like most countries and if you earn good money there's nice parts to live in

But for me its the weather that's starting to piss me off, i don't think there's a day that goes by without me thinking about moving abroad working online helps with the need of not having to find work where ever i go but so far i am still undecided

I want to be near my family and friends but slowly realizing that i don't actually see them that much anyway and can't plan my life around them

Got family and friends in Australia, They tell me how much things cost and that cost living is crazy along with house prices

Lived in Spain for 8 months loved being on the beach loved everything there it apart from most of the English there, a lot people who living there are living a lie they tell you its great and they are living the dream posting pictures of the beach etc.. but there not they just don' want to admit it

One friend i do have out there who lives near Gibraltar border on Costa Del Sol tells me house prices have crashed a lot as we know and you can pick up some nice places and the bars and restaurants are busy so to a tourist all looks good, But there's a lot issues unseen like local police not being paid etc...

USA part of me loves the idea of San Diego, But again knowing a few Americans they are all looking to move away from USA, Because of the taxes and stupid laws that are being brought in

Weird thing is in my job i have contact with people and chat daily to people from Argentina, USA, Italy, Spain, UK, Russia, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and few other eastern European countries all born and raised and everyone of them hate there countries and are looking at other countries to live in

A lot them seem to be talking about Asia a lot more

But who knows

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i don't think there's a day that goes by without me thinking about moving abroad working online helps with the need of not having to find work where ever i go but so far i am still undecided

Where have you decided to settle I'm the uk, seeing as it could be anywhere?

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Where have you decided to settle I'm the uk, seeing as it could be anywhere?

Still undecided and still living in the UK, like most thought house prices would crash faster, thought the EU would fall apart then if they did wait to see whats left but all these things are just dragging along now

Will i ever move abroad not sure still looking into different countries like i said a lot people who grew up in these other countries are looking to move abroad themselves

Seems like not many people are happy with where they live, and we all look thinking the grass is greener on the other side i think most people just want a simple life

work, enjoy life and family

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