Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Bootsox

Providence Chapel

Recommended Posts

Read about this place in today's Sunday Times:

Providence Chapel

A former chapel, bought for £177,777 at auction with £500,000 spent on conversion.

Line in Times says "the owners should make £110k profit on the property".

Should be interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm. A mere £100k profit on a £677k investment. And that's if they get the asking price and don't have to wait 2 years for someone to offer them £700k.

It's only just good enough to get on Homes Under The Hammer. Then again, it's in the powerhouse south, so there must be some berk willing to bid it up to £850k.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1365371207[/url]' post='909298845']

No EPC shown. The heating bills will be massive with rooms that high.

EPCs for homes were first introduced in 2007 as part of home information packs (Hips) for home sellers. Hips were scrapped in 2010, but if you're selling your house you're still legally required to have an EPC in place.

http://www.which.co.uk/money/mortgages-and-property/guides/how-to-sell-a-house/energy-performance-certificates-explained/

Suppose it's available on request?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1365376023[/url]' post='909298892']

What's with the freaky child in the seat in picture #5? ph34r.gif

I missed her the first time flicking through, so went back & actually experienced a little shiver of fear when I saw her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1365381840[/url]' post='909298910']

I wouldn't like to try planting potatoes in the garden.

I'm guessing the soil will be rich in nutrients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EPCs for homes were first introduced in 2007 as part of home information packs (Hips) for home sellers. Hips were scrapped in 2010, but if you're selling your house you're still legally required to have an EPC in place.

http://www.which.co....ates-explained/

Suppose it's available on request?

Certain types of property (basically, anything 'non standard' in construction), may not not be suitable for an EPC, as the EPC models are based on 'normal' construction methods for the age of the building.

I would think a chapel conversion would be 'non-standard'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Read about this place in today's Sunday Times:

Providence Chapel

A former chapel, bought for £177,777 at auction with £500,000 spent on conversion.

Line in Times says "the owners should make £110k profit on the property".

Should be interesting.

They have competition, bigger and cheaper: http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-38125054.html

And more: http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/find.html?locationIdentifier=POSTCODE^791710&minPrice=200000&maxPrice=800000&minBedrooms=4&radius=3.0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the problem with houses like this is that it is not for everyone. some people find living in a chapel a bit creepy.

if you look on street view there are parking issues.

you want to sell something go with your local agent not the posh twits. immediately I would say that is too expensive.

how do you spend 500k on a chapel and shed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Read about this place in today's Sunday Times:

Providence Chapel

A former chapel, bought for £177,777 at auction with £500,000 spent on conversion.

Line in Times says "the owners should make £110k profit on the property".

Should be interesting.

Just to price stamp the property, should have said "Guide Price £795,000".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Read about this place in today's Sunday Times:

Providence Chapel

A former chapel, bought for £177,777 at auction with £500,000 spent on conversion.

Line in Times says "the owners should make £110k profit on the property".

Should be interesting.

According to a 2006 Guardian story, they bought for £177,777 in 2003. She says 7 is their lucky number.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to price stamp the property, should have said "Guide Price £795,000".

Price reduced "Guide Price £750,000"

Edited by Bootsox

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some people jokingly say our planning departments aren't corrupt. This is a prime exhibit of brown envelopes or its owned by someone who is very friendly with a councillor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sold for £790,501. http://www.rightmove.co.uk/house-prices/detailMatching.html?prop=39208555&sale=554722&country=england

Yet another sale to someone who "didn't know what they were doing," "was told house prices double every few years" and all the other excuses, as we continue to suffer stupid high prices, and new buyers (not dragged into banks to force them to overpay) pushing them ever higher still.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.