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Petrol Pump Sales Decrease Over Five Years, Says Aa

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22035949

Forecourt sales of petrol have plunged by more than 20% in five years, the AA has said.

The motoring organisation said official government figures showed 17 billion litres were sold last year compared to 22 billion in 2007.

The AA said rising prices and greater use of smaller and diesel vehicles had contributed to the fall in consumption.

Combined with an increase in the sale of diesel, total vehicle fuel sales fell by 9% over the past five years.

The AA said the decrease was the equivalent of 35 days of business being lost since the start of the economic crisis.

Diesel sales increased from 14 billion litres in 2007 to 16 billion litres in 2012.

More recently, petrol sales decreased from 18.27 billion litres in 2011 to 17.42 billion litres last year.

Thank god the Govt don't see fuel as an tax golden egg....

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22035949

Thank god the Govt don't see fuel as an tax golden egg....

They've realised it isn't any more. The duty on unleaded fuel is now less than it was in 2010.

Labour thought it was, it went from 40p per litre in 1997 to 58p by 2010.

http://customs.hmrc.gov.uk/channelsPortalWebApp/downloadFile?contentID=HMCE_PROD1_023552

Problem is, the revenue from fuel is dropping, so they'll need to raise it elsewhere. Cut spending?? Still waiting.

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I expect food to do the same. And pretty much everything else. If they keep trying to squeeze money out of people, the economy will get worse and people will simply buy less stuff.

It's more obvious with fuel; the price to fill your tank used to be £30, now it's £70 and up. As it approaches £100 that's a significant portion of most people's weekly wage gone in the short time it takes to fill up. I often hear about people cutting back on driving ("I used to go out for a drive on a Sunday when the weather's nice but don't anymore") but I don't hear about people cutting back on food shopping; being a bit smarter and buying cheaper alternatives yes but not cutting back.

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It's more obvious with fuel; the price to fill your tank used to be £30, now it's £70 and up. As it approaches £100 that's a significant portion of most people's weekly wage gone in the short time it takes to fill up. I often hear about people cutting back on driving ("I used to go out for a drive on a Sunday when the weather's nice but don't anymore") but I don't hear about people cutting back on food shopping; being a bit smarter and buying cheaper alternatives yes but not cutting back.

Yup. I fettle with my motorbikes now more than I ride them! I used to be able to go out and have a few hours of riding for fun for £10. That was fine. It now costs £20 - really that should still be fine, but it's much more of a treat as my salary is yet to double. So the bike is just an alternative commuting tool to the car instead most of the time - which is sad.

As for food, that is still extraordinarily cheap if you shop cannily.

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Yup. I fettle with my motorbikes now more than I ride them! I used to be able to go out and have a few hours of riding for fun for £10. That was fine. It now costs £20 - really that should still be fine, but it's much more of a treat as my salary is yet to double. So the bike is just an alternative commuting tool to the car instead most of the time - which is sad.

As for food, that is still extraordinarily cheap if you shop cannily.

Your not serious are you? The whole cost of running the machine hasn't doubled has it? I think you have just gone off riding them perhaps the commute has put you off.

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They've realised it isn't any more. The duty on unleaded fuel is now less than it was in 2010.

Labour thought it was, it went from 40p per litre in 1997 to 58p by 2010.

http://customs.hmrc.gov.uk/channelsPortalWebApp/downloadFile?contentID=HMCE_PROD1_023552

Problem is, the revenue from fuel is dropping, so they'll need to raise it elsewhere. Cut spending?? Still waiting.

VAT is 20% compared to 17.5% a couple of years back, plus petrol prices VAT are added to have never been higher.

Theyve not lost out.

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I'd expect petrol sales to keep declining steeply (article implies a 4.7% y-o-y drop between 2011/2012)- 90% of car sales were petrol in 2000, and many of these will be hitting the scrapper before long, most will be replaced with DERVs. The UK's addiction to buying cars on tick probably favours diesels as well, the potential long term costs of diesel ownership (DMF, DPF, injectors) are mostly avoided for the initial user.

Edited by cheeznbreed

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There are only 2 classes.

The Elite - who will still be able to afford fuel.

The Proletariat - who won't.

You're the latter.

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Your not serious are you? The whole cost of running the machine hasn't doubled has it? I think you have just gone off riding them perhaps the commute has put you off.

you are right, the cost of running it has gone up about 50% rather than a hundred, but I see that extra 50% everytime I go to a pump rather than the lump costs. it certainly has made me more aware of the cost of the ride. but there is an element of the commute taking some of the fun out.

I still enjoy riding for fun, just less often.

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Peak Car http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_car

This is interesting article on BMW's former head of design re declining use cars by younger generation

http://www.copenhage...l-mobility.html

Doug Short maintains monthly updates on per capita volume sales and miles driven.

Per capita volume sales have been falling since a peak in 1989.

http://advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/Gasoline-Sales.php

Population adjusted miles driven are back to 1995 levels.

http://advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/DOT-Miles-Driven.php

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Using some highly complex algebra that I learnt doing o-Levels over 40 years ago, I make the fall in petrol but a rise in more fuel efficient diesel an approximate, back of fag packet, fall in miles driven in the uk of 5% per year. ;)

So Headline: petrol fuel falls by one quarter since the financial crisis...

...translates to fall of 9% in total volume of fuel sales when diesel included....

...translates to an approx fall in miles driven of 5% to take into account more efficient diesel mpg.

no offence but i think you have your λ's and ψ's mixed up as i make it 6.7%

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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Isn't it because World + Dog has diesel engines now? :huh:

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More meaningful is the miles traveled. Everyone could be using Hydrogen or electric cars, and zero petrol, but doing more miles.

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What the hell does this mean?

The AA said the decrease was the equivalent of 35 days of business being lost since the start of the economic crisis.

Alternatively; people spend their wonga on a lot more productive and interesting stuff than petrol.

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Scrappage got rid of a lot of fuel inefficient cars ......and just look how prevalent 1 litre cars are .....

http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/News/Search-Results/Industry-News/UK-2012-car-sales-analysis-winners-and-losers/

a full tank costs me around £35

Older cars tend to be lighter, and i would say like for like better on fuel. I can get 40 mpg out on my 20 year old 2 litre hot hatch. I dare say if you took a 1.4 litre version of the same car it would be as good on fuel as anythingin the same class today. Simply because it would be a couple of hundred kg lighter.

Edit to add, the book figure on my previously owned 1987 honda crx was 56 mpg at 55 mph. It would easily do this.

Some new 1.6 to 2 litre focus sized cars struggle to get 35 mpg.

Edited by Lewis Gordon Pugh

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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