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BristolBuyer

Redundancies On The Horizon

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I'm a software developer in a large IT company. Although there have been no announcements, the workstreams from our main customers are likely to shrink over the next 12 months, and I reckon there's at least a 50% chance of redundancies in my office, with little chance of internal redeployment. The office might close altogether. I think I'm one of the more employable people in the office, but I'm not sure that will count for much. I don't expect to get more than statutory minimum redundancy.

Like many on this forum (I suspect), my savings are much larger than my outgoings, which might be a factor. I don't like the amount of office politics in my job, but I'm trying to develop thick skin, and focusing on my salary, which is above average for the job I do.

My question is, should I wait until redundancies are (probably) announced, or move to a different company now, possibly with a small pay cut?

I've never been made redundant before; is it harder to negotiate a good salary with a new employer when you're in a position of weakness (ie. imminent unemployment) ?

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I'm a software developer in a large IT company. Although there have been no announcements, the workstreams from our main customers are likely to shrink over the next 12 months, and I reckon there's at least a 50% chance of redundancies in my office, with little chance of internal redeployment. The office might close altogether. I think I'm one of the more employable people in the office, but I'm not sure that will count for much. I don't expect to get more than statutory minimum redundancy.

Like many on this forum (I suspect), my savings are much larger than my outgoings, which might be a factor. I don't like the amount of office politics in my job, but I'm trying to develop thick skin, and focusing on my salary, which is above average for the job I do.

My question is, should I wait until redundancies are (probably) announced, or move to a different company now, possibly with a small pay cut?

I've never been made redundant before; is it harder to negotiate a good salary with a new employer when you're in a position of weakness (ie. imminent unemployment) ?

All depends - how long have you been there? What type and size of company is it? Is it like a Microsoft or a Cisco who might give generous redundancy terms or by "large" do you mean, with all respect, some mickey mouse outfit in a small UK town?

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I'm a software developer in a large IT company. Although there have been no announcements, the workstreams from our main customers are likely to shrink over the next 12 months, and I reckon there's at least a 50% chance of redundancies in my office, with little chance of internal redeployment. The office might close altogether. I think I'm one of the more employable people in the office, but I'm not sure that will count for much. I don't expect to get more than statutory minimum redundancy.

Like many on this forum (I suspect), my savings are much larger than my outgoings, which might be a factor. I don't like the amount of office politics in my job, but I'm trying to develop thick skin, and focusing on my salary, which is above average for the job I do.

My question is, should I wait until redundancies are (probably) announced, or move to a different company now, possibly with a small pay cut?

I've never been made redundant before; is it harder to negotiate a good salary with a new employer when you're in a position of weakness (ie. imminent unemployment) ?

A good bit of advice for you, if you have any questions make sure you call the government ACAS service as it is free (apart from the 0845 number.....) and they gave some excellent free advice to my GF who recently got made redundant.

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I'm a software developer in a large IT company. Although there have been no announcements, the workstreams from our main customers are likely to shrink over the next 12 months, and I reckon there's at least a 50% chance of redundancies in my office, with little chance of internal redeployment. The office might close altogether. I think I'm one of the more employable people in the office, but I'm not sure that will count for much. I don't expect to get more than statutory minimum redundancy.

Like many on this forum (I suspect), my savings are much larger than my outgoings, which might be a factor. I don't like the amount of office politics in my job, but I'm trying to develop thick skin, and focusing on my salary, which is above average for the job I do.

My question is, should I wait until redundancies are (probably) announced, or move to a different company now, possibly with a small pay cut?

I've never been made redundant before; is it harder to negotiate a good salary with a new employer when you're in a position of weakness (ie. imminent unemployment) ?

Generally, it is easier to find a job when you have a job, provided you are motivated to look

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I've never been made redundant before; is it harder to negotiate a good salary with a new employer when you're in a position of weakness (ie. imminent unemployment) ?

I have been made redundant, and had to make people redundant. Don't underestimate the emotional toll it can take on you - a non financial cost that is often significant. Also, if they do make redundancies and you stay, will you be left in an impossible working environment (i.e. not enough resources and increased workload).

On the other hand, if you do leave and join another company, often it is last in first out, so you could be facing the same situation down the road if THAT company has problems.

re negotiating a new salary - no, I have not found employers differentiate nowadays as they recognise good people get made redundant. In fact, it can be in your favour as you can start sooner (no notice periods!).

good luck whatever you decide. just remember to put YOURSELF first, not the company.

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I'd probably start looking now.

1) For some reason companies seem to hold not having a job against people. IE why doesn't anyone else hire them, they must be rubbish.

2) If it is a large IT company then waiting till redundancy means by definition you'll have a fair few similarly experienced people in the same area all looking for a job at the same time.

You never know you may get a job and then made redundant so best of both worlds.

I know of someone who that happened to. Was just about to hand his notice in when he was made redundant. Big cheque cashed, walked straight from one job to the next.

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Yep, you could leave and go to another company only for that to then fire people - your old company may not even have fired anyone.

Generally, if it is a large company, the line I would personally take is one of waiting for the first round of redundancies and then taking it and running a mile and not looking back. Often the first redundancy packages are the best ones.

The problem then though is that they may want to keep you on - if that is the case then, as others have said, you may find yourself really ill with stress because you are over-worked.

I worked for a major US tech company back in 2000 when the started laying people off. The first round of redundancies were incredibly generous. By the time they got to the third round the packages were cr*p. The people left behind were stressed as heck due to all the extra work they had to do. Some walked but got not a penny then.

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Generally, it is easier to find a job when you have a job, provided you are motivated to look

Agree completely. My employment field requires a good bit of negotiation after the acceptance stage, and the above is the only set of conditions where you can fight for decent pay and T&C's of work. If out of employment, expect a long probation period and to start at the bottom of the payscale!

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Agree completely. My employment field requires a good bit of negotiation after the acceptance stage, and the above is the only set of conditions where you can fight for decent pay and T&C's of work. If out of employment, expect a long probation period and to start at the bottom of the payscale!

B*llox. Marlon Brando did not work for years and then got paid millions for that Vietnam War film. Didn't work again for a few years and got paid a million for a few minutes in Superman.

:D

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B*llox. Marlon Brando did not work for years and then got paid millions for that Vietnam War film. Didn't work again for a few years and got paid a million for a few minutes in Superman.

:D

:D unfortunately, my line of work is not Hollywood acting.

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A bit of anecdotal. Recession finally got me last year, not through redundancy but through deteriorating work conditions to the point where there was no point staying and I was stagnating horribly in my career. I went for 3 other jobs:

1) state sector closed-shop style job where you had to work there to be able to answer their interview questions (What buttion do you press when (specific piece of bespoke equipment) fails?

2) more my sector - my CV fitted the job but they knew I was desperate to move and get out (Interviewer knew someone else trying to get out from same place)

3) more my sector - my CV fitted the job and they had no idea I wanted to move

Result

1) rejected

2) offered derisory job - part-time at bottom of scale despite workload being HUGE

3) offered job at competitive salary

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I'm a software developer in a large IT company. Although there have been no announcements, the workstreams from our main customers are likely to shrink over the next 12 months, and I reckon there's at least a 50% chance of redundancies in my office, with little chance of internal redeployment. The office might close altogether. I think I'm one of the more employable people in the office, but I'm not sure that will count for much. I don't expect to get more than statutory minimum redundancy.

Like many on this forum (I suspect), my savings are much larger than my outgoings, which might be a factor. I don't like the amount of office politics in my job, but I'm trying to develop thick skin, and focusing on my salary, which is above average for the job I do.

My question is, should I wait until redundancies are (probably) announced, or move to a different company now, possibly with a small pay cut?

I've never been made redundant before; is it harder to negotiate a good salary with a new employer when you're in a position of weakness (ie. imminent unemployment) ?

From a slightly different angle, if you've ever considered a career change, redundancy money can be a good buffer for retraining or even just thinking.

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In a similar position myself, my circumstances maybe completely different from yours, but I'm hanging on for a payout, this will be the 3rd time for me, seems I'm making a career out of it :D

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  • 241 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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