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Previous Owners Stuff Still In My New Place

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Just moved into my new place which I completed on Wednesday 27th of Feb. The owner was an emotional type (not violent, just pathetic and a bit of a drunk) and having 'issues' packing up and leaving as he'd been there since 1986. I felt sorry for him so gave him 5 days 'grace' to get his stuff out.

Came back on Sunday and he was drunk in bed, nothing moved. I called his brother to physically remove him, which he did, got his keys too. I agreed verbally with his brother that everything would get shifted by this weekend (9th and 10th) or I'd be taking it further with my solicitor. Anyway, having never been in this situation before, I'm at a loss as to how to proceed if the borther in fact doesn't get his finger out - as I haven't had to 'instruct' a solictor or anything else before in any form of dispute - can I just approach a local one, or does it need to be the one who did the conveyancing?

Advice welcome!

G

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Why do you need a solicitor? You're in the house, he's out, you have the keys, his stuff is not your problem.

You don't need a solicitor, you need a skip!

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Why do you need a solicitor? You're in the house, he's out, you have the keys, his stuff is not your problem.

You don't need a solicitor, you need a skip!

Hi VoR

I was under the impression that, legally, it's still his property and I have a 'duty of care' (or some such nonsense) to it. I seem to remember that squatters can claim if you throw out their manky blankets etc, but that's squatters, not feckless drunks with emotional problems...

gb

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Just moved into my new place which I completed on Wednesday 27th of Feb. The owner was an emotional type (not violent, just pathetic and a bit of a drunk) and having 'issues' packing up and leaving as he'd been there since 1986. I felt sorry for him so gave him 5 days 'grace' to get his stuff out.

Came back on Sunday and he was drunk in bed, nothing moved. I called his brother to physically remove him, which he did, got his keys too. I agreed verbally with his brother that everything would get shifted by this weekend (9th and 10th) or I'd be taking it further with my solicitor. Anyway, having never been in this situation before, I'm at a loss as to how to proceed if the borther in fact doesn't get his finger out - as I haven't had to 'instruct' a solictor or anything else before in any form of dispute - can I just approach a local one, or does it need to be the one who did the conveyancing?

Advice welcome!

G

Hold on - let me get this straight. The house is now in your name and the previous householder was still there after completion (what if they'd torched the place?). 5 days "grace" has passed and now you are suggesting a further extension for him to get his stuff out! And then what happens come this w/e when nothing's happened?

What are you thinking? You're being a soft-touch and doing more for this person than his brother.

You have no obligation to this person. You completed on 27 Feb - whenever was agreed was the time for them to get their possessions and themselves out.

If any of it is worth anything they would have organised transport by now. I'd let your solicitor know that the previous resident had left possessions and could he advise the seller's solicitor you will be disposing of it immediately. I'd say any reasonable solicitor would see this as just a little mopping up so shouldn't charge you. Want to play hard ball? Get your solicitor to advise all costs will be picked up by the seller.

It's up to you if you want to call the council to uplift it, flog it on Gumtree/ebay, give it to a charity, or keep it and use for yourself.

There's compassion and there's being taken advantage of...

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Hi VoR

I was under the impression that, legally, it's still his property and I have a 'duty of care' (or some such nonsense) to it. I seem to remember that squatters can claim if you throw out their manky blankets etc, but that's squatters, not feckless drunks with emotional problems...

gb

I don't know where you stand legally, but I agree with pyracantha's post. Also if you want to find out where you stand legally and don't want to run up a legal bill then perhaps ask the CAB.

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Hold on - let me get this straight. The house is now in your name and the previous householder was still there after completion (what if they'd torched the place?). 5 days "grace" has passed and now you are suggesting a further extension for him to get his stuff out! And then what happens come this w/e when nothing's happened?

What are you thinking? You're being a soft-touch and doing more for this person than his brother.

There's compassion and there's being taken advantage of...

Cheers Pyra - fair point but they're not really the taking the p### types, just bumbling academics the pair of them. I was in no rush but you can only push me so far then the gloves come off - which is now!

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Cheers Pyra - fair point but they're not really the taking the p### types, just bumbling academics the pair of them. I was in no rush but you can only push me so far then the gloves come off - which is now!

Good for you. Your avatar wasn't matching your "cup of human kindness" approach so far ;)

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Good for you. Your avatar wasn't matching your "cup of human kindness" approach so far ;)

Ha! - Yes, a few choice sigils heading their way :ph34r:

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This happened to me ten years ago. I completed on a house and moved in to find it full of the previous owners stuff - all his clothes, furniture, beer, food.

I was at a loss too and phoned the estate agent who told me to skip it, which I did.

I drank the beer, first.

The previous owner was an alkie. Had debt collectors come round for ages.

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This happened to me ten years ago. I completed on a house and moved in to find it full of the previous owners stuff - all his clothes, furniture, beer, food.

I was at a loss too and phoned the estate agent who told me to skip it, which I did.

I drank the beer, first.

The previous owner was an alkie. Had debt collectors come round for ages.

Maybe it's the same guy?

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Difficult one this. In general, you cannot get rid of goods not belonging to you, without first giving notice to the owner of the goods that you intend to dispose of them. The legislation is the Torts (Interference with Goods) Act. This includes taking reasonable steps to prevent damage to the goods.

If you want to follow the letter of the law, you need to send written notice to the previous owner giving them a date (typically 30 days) by which they must collect the goods, because you intend to sell or dispose of them. The owner of the goods has a claim against you if you dispose, sell, damage or allow to be damaged, the goods, before the stated date. In addition, if you sell the goods, you are required to forward the proceeds of the sale to the owner.

In most cases, you'd be fine just skipping the lot, but there are a number of litigious people about who like to cause trouble. There are a few groups of "professional troublesome tenants" who do just this. When they leave at the end of the tenancy, the fill the house with crap and junk, then do a bunk with no forwarding address. The landlord skips the crap. 3 months later, the ex-tenants sue the LL in court for the loss of their stuff; they usually win, as the LL typically didn't have proof of value of the junk, nor an inventory of it. So when the tenant claims that they left a valuable antique boudoir and provides a photo to the court, while the LL has no evidence to support their case, the tenants end up winning by default.

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In most cases, you'd be fine just skipping the lot, but there are a number of litigious people about who like to cause trouble. There are a few groups of "professional troublesome tenants" who do just this. When they leave at the end of the tenancy, the fill the house with crap and junk, then do a bunk with no forwarding address. The landlord skips the crap. 3 months later, the ex-tenants sue the LL in court for the loss of their stuff; they usually win, as the LL typically didn't have proof of value of the junk, nor an inventory of it. So when the tenant claims that they left a valuable antique boudoir and provides a photo to the court, while the LL has no evidence to support their case, the tenants end up winning by default.

How do they prove it was there when they left?

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Why do you need a solicitor? You're in the house, he's out, you have the keys, his stuff is not your problem.

You don't need a solicitor, you need a skip!

I don't see why a buyer should have to get rid of someone else's crap.

A bit late now for the OP, but it's as well to refuse to complete if you suspect they're going to leave a load of stuff for you to get rid of.

I have done this in the past - I knew the b*gger was going to leave stuff, and he did - including a manky old sofa. I told the EA and solicitor completion was conditional on the place being clear - he still tried it on but I wasn't having it. He finally cleared it with a lot of grumping and moaning. Tough.

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I don't see why a buyer should have to get rid of someone else's crap.

A bit late now for the OP, but it's as well to refuse to complete if you suspect they're going to leave a load of stuff for you to get rid of.

I have done this in the past - I knew the b*gger was going to leave stuff, and he did - including a manky old sofa. I told the EA and solicitor completion was conditional on the place being clear - he still tried it on but I wasn't having it. He finally cleared it with a lot of grumping and moaning. Tough.

Repo I made an offer on about a year ago had a lot of old stuff to clear out.

Indoors, things like kitchen cupboards and radiators ripped out. Great, I get a place that's structurally good but unencumbered by someone else's design, to mould to my own tastes.

Outside, a potentially-gorgeous garden, but where the lower section was not just wild-ish (ancient and very big trees), but seemed to be an unofficial dump. I'd've had to hire several skips to clear that lot, and I was thinking I'd have to try asking a local college if I could provide a weekend's paid employment for a gang of sixth-formers to help with the work.

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Outside, a potentially-gorgeous garden, but where the lower section was not just wild-ish (ancient and very big trees), but seemed to be an unofficial dump. I'd've had to hire several skips to clear that lot, and I was thinking I'd have to try asking a local college if I could provide a weekend's paid employment for a gang of sixth-formers to help with the work.

... but in the end you didn't have to do that because you made the bank do it? Refused to complete until the garden was cleared?

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... but in the end you didn't have to do that because you made the bank do it? Refused to complete until the garden was cleared?

... but in the end I didn't have to do that because I declined to get into a bidding war (their offer - through a different agent - was earlier than mine). Rather let someone else get a bargain that push the price up so noone got a bargain.

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  • 219 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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