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Fairly Green To All This House Building.... Help!


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Hi all

I've posted a few times a while back and now look like to be on the cusp of making the leap to buy. We moved here about two years ago having sold our house in SE England. About 18 months ago we saw a house we liked, liked the builders attitude but the location wasn't quite right. Fast forward to now and the builder has approached us about another plot. It turns out it perfect - near our sons school, near friends, near our jobs, in a village that's perceived locally as affluent and good transport links ( last 2 good in my eyes if we ever need / want to sell). I know the women next door through work and she says the builder was easy to work with and straight. The plot just has had outlined planning approved with the only condition being ridge height. We have the plans to another property ( that builder couldn't proceed to complete and we want to have a small mortgage) that this current builder is confident will be approved. The house is 2600 sq ft on a 1/2 acre site. Other houses in the district have a RV of around £195k ( but with small sites that are overlooked, on newbuild estates etc). The builder wants £190k, or slightly less once the fine detail of kitchen finish etc have been agreed. My question is what happens next? I don't want to go down he self build mortgage route. Sorry to be so green, but my past experience has been find house, make offer, get mortgage, buy!

Cheers in advance for any advice

R

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Make sure that the builder is solvent and won't go bust losing you lots of money.

Thanks for that. I've done a credit check on him and he looks ok. General gossip is that he's ridden the recession well as he owned most of the land he's built on - typical family of farmers and he's the son with a trade

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Hi all

I've posted a few times a while back and now look like to be on the cusp of making the leap to buy. We moved here about two years ago having sold our house in SE England. About 18 months ago we saw a house we liked, liked the builders attitude but the location wasn't quite right. Fast forward to now and the builder has approached us about another plot. It turns out it perfect - near our sons school, near friends, near our jobs, in a village that's perceived locally as affluent and good transport links ( last 2 good in my eyes if we ever need / want to sell). I know the women next door through work and she says the builder was easy to work with and straight. The plot just has had outlined planning approved with the only condition being ridge height. We have the plans to another property ( that builder couldn't proceed to complete and we want to have a small mortgage) that this current builder is confident will be approved. The house is 2600 sq ft on a 1/2 acre site. Other houses in the district have a RV of around £195k ( but with small sites that are overlooked, on newbuild estates etc). The builder wants £190k, or slightly less once the fine detail of kitchen finish etc have been agreed. My question is what happens next? I don't want to go down he self build mortgage route. Sorry to be so green, but my past experience has been find house, make offer, get mortgage, buy!

Cheers in advance for any advice

R

Double check everything - e.g. make sure you have copyright to the drawings, drop in to the local planners with the drawings to make sure you are good to go. Remember that getting planning can take up to 8 weeks or more in some circumstances. It may be advisable to consult with a local Surveyor or even Architect before you start to ensure all the boxes are ticked.

On this last if you are buying a plot of land then, in spite of any additional cost to amend drawings, it would be a bit of a missed opportunity to tailor the construction to what you would prefer. At the very least it may be a good idea to simply review the drawings and make sure the design its OK - more people than you might imagine find 2D drawings difficult to understand.

What and how you are purchasing is of interest. I hope - as implied above - the builder isn't asking for 190K upfront !

If you don't want a self-build mortgage then basically the builder builds it and sells it to you - you are buying 'off plan'. No doubt you will have to put down some sort of (as small as possible) deposit and agree a contract. Even in this instance you should do all the credit checks etc - some banks can help you with this.

Alternatively - I know you don't want this but - the builder sells you the plot and you pay him in stages as each section of construction is built. The builder should supply you with a detailed programme before beginning and the Banks will often have a QS to check the progress of the builder against payments. Builder probably doesn't want this either as you could then test the market with other contractors and probably get a cheaper price. In fact people are sometimes surprised how relatively cheap it is to build, which leads us back to the main topic of this site....

You will need some sort of contract advice - for example it could be a 'turnkey' type contract, where your builder is entirely responsible for delivering a fit for purpose product rather than building to design advice by professionals. Bear in mind that you may have outline planning but there are plenty of other hoops to jump through such as Building Control etc which the Builder or whomever needs to manage. Obviously guarantees and insurance need to be looked into, and what will be necessary to make the building saleable in the near future if necessary.

The key thing is only paying for what you actually tangibly possess - buildings take time to build and in the worst case scenario the builder goes bust (bit of a risk in this climate!) or absconds and goodbye money.

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Thanks for you reassuring and detailed post.

The builder would like a £5k holding deposit to be lodged with a solicitor or the EA he uses. He has suggested meeting directly with his architect to discuss our plans as he felt they could be improved ( I do agree) . He also said as the plans were older build regulations have become tighter about insulation etc. We'd already asked who would own the plans - but hadn't got a clear answer, so I'll push that one.

My worry was if we couldn't get our plans passed -the only issue condition on outlined was ridge height. Where we would stand. The builder is confident ( as they all are!) that our plans will pass. I'm guessing the £5k is to cover architects fees? Just a little nervous to hand over hard earned cash

Thanks again for the advice

Anyone else want to chip in their advice go ahead - educate me!

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Anyone else want to chip in their advice go ahead - educate me!

Get your own architect and your own plans if you're going down the self build mortgage route.

Insulate, insulate, insulate far above building reg requirements.

Cost you more now but save you in the short- medium term.

Self build at kings hall 15-17th Feb (I'm sure you know about it and are already going)

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Insulate, insulate, insulate far above building reg requirements.

Don't forget airtightness.

I was in a house recently that was almost passive house standard. I was surprised when the front door was left open that the hall did not get cold. The house was so airtight there was no draught through the open door even though it was breezy outside. Instead of the usual extractor fans and trickel vents, they have a mechanical heat recovery ventilation system in the house.

Hopefully an architect would be able to advise on a systems like this.

One tip I can give you from our house - DO NOT put in downlighters. You will lose more heat through them than you save with insulation. I thought there was a problem with our kitchen windows. It was the draught from the downlights I was feeling on the back of my neck. May as well leave the flippen windows open :angry: I'm having to replace them all with new airtight/insulation coverable fittings.

Edited by Belfast Boy
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Don't forget airtightness.

I was in a house recently that was almost passive house standard. I was surprised when the front door was left open that the hall did not get cold. The house was so airtight there was no draught through the open door even though it was breezy outside. Instead of the usual extractor fans and trickel vents, they have a mechanical heat recovery ventilation system in the house.

Hopefully an architect would be able to advise on a systems like this.

One tip I can give you from our house - DO NOT put in downlighters. You will lose more heat through them than you save with insulation. I thought there was a problem with our kitchen windows. It was the draught from the downlights I was feeling on the back of my neck. May as well leave the flippen windows open :angry: I'm having to replace them all with new airtight/insulation coverable fittings.

Thanks for the tips. Organised a solicitor so feel more reassured. Booked tickets for self build show....I'm sure that will provide me with hundreds of ways to spend money :lol:

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  • 415 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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