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Rip Tides: Biggest Beach Killer


pl1

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Or a bit of education. Chuck this sort of thing into general teaching, e.g. geography lessons. You'd probably be surprised how many people would hear it in a lesson, forget they ever knew it, then remember if the subject comes up (hopefully not because they need to know).

Incidentally best to wait or start swimming perpedicular to the beach straight away?

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Or a bit of education. Chuck this sort of thing into general teaching, e.g. geography lessons. You'd probably be surprised how many people would hear it in a lesson, forget they ever knew it, then remember if the subject comes up (hopefully not because they need to know).

Incidentally best to wait or start swimming perpedicular to the beach straight away?

Parallel to the beach, surely?

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Nah, no large signs please, no plastering the world with warnings and notifications and so on. There's far, far too much of that already. Keep them for the really un-obvious dangers (jumping into the sea is an obvious danger, even if the precise details of it are something I might not know). Let me experience the world as it is, not as a neatly packaged and sanitised and presented on a plate version. A bit more risk (and yes, a few dead people, even if there's a chance of me being one of them) is worth it. A change in that direction would leave me slightly less depressed than I am.

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The optimal angle is around 80 degrees normal to the beach line, biased toward the sand.

Good think I always carry a protractor in my swimming trunks.

Who remembers those metal tins with stuff in ? Did anyone ever find a use for the set square ? And was the compass actually good for anything other than attempting to take your mates eye out ?

Anyway - back to riptides. I got caught in one of these once and swam like hell. Got out eventually but it was hard work. Not sure which direction I went in.

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Hang on...sing away from the beach and swim perpendicular?

You lot are weird. Remind me never to get on a sinking ship with you :)

P

Singing helps everything !!

Ok well if not putting signs up telling folk the obvious - why not real advice from fellow surfers from the area to help if caught out - like noted above ?

Surely that's handy and not just the usual health and safety nonsense ?

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I got caught in a rip tide, dragged me out but I would use the dips in the waves to get a footing and jump up to catch in-coming waves that propelled me back to shore. Even with the water below my knees it was hard work wading back the last bit. This was on a beach in North Wales that is usually really safe but despite it being a lovely day a storm surge from the med had churned the water up.

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Nah, no large signs please, no plastering the world with warnings and notifications and so on. There's far, far too much of that already. Keep them for the really un-obvious dangers (jumping into the sea is an obvious danger, even if the precise details of it are something I might not know). Let me experience the world as it is, not as a neatly packaged and sanitised and presented on a plate version. A bit more risk (and yes, a few dead people, even if there's a chance of me being one of them) is worth it. A change in that direction would leave me slightly less depressed than I am.

Have you thought of others, other people risking their own life to save stupid irresponsible people.

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Good think I always carry a protractor in my swimming trunks.

Who remembers those metal tins with stuff in ? Did anyone ever find a use for the set square ? And was the compass actually good for anything other than attempting to take your mates eye out ?

Anyway - back to riptides. I got caught in one of these once and swam like hell. Got out eventually but it was hard work. Not sure which direction I went in.

I find it helps for those "senior moments".

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It's a difficult one for Mawgan Porth where the deaths were this weekend. I'm an ex-lifeguard so when caught in a rip (once) I knew just to go with it and wait for it to drop me then I swam back.

Mawgan Porth is a narrow beach and the surf was 6 - 9 ft, so if you're taken out you have no obvious way back; can't just swim along the beach - too narrow, and trying to climb out on the rocks is made v difficult by the crashing surf.

In that situation I'd have paddled out around the headland to the next beach (Watergate) and walked back; but I have the advantages of having been caught in a rip, having been a lifeguard, and knowing that bit of coast.

Tragedy but only preventable with a lifeguard on duty IMO.

Sorry I don't get this Frank. I took a look at photos of Mawgan Porth and while it's a narrow bay, it's still hundreds of yards wide. Are you saying the rip current would be as wide as the bay. Why couldn't you immediately swim parallel to the shore?

I think I see the rip currents in this photo

261big.jpg

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Sorry I don't get this Frank. I took a look at photos of Mawgan Porth and while it's a narrow bay, it's still hundreds of yards wide. Are you saying the rip current would be as wide as the bay. Why couldn't you immediately swim parallel to the shore?

I think I see the rip currents in this photo

261big.jpg

That's wider than I remember it. The subsequent rescuers were saying that there was an undertow making it very hard to stand up; that could have been across the beach so throw in a rip that takes you out in the first place and you might not have the strength to get back onto that beach.

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Sorry I don't get this Frank. I took a look at photos of Mawgan Porth and while it's a narrow bay, it's still hundreds of yards wide. Are you saying the rip current would be as wide as the bay. Why couldn't you immediately swim parallel to the shore?

I think I see the rip currents in this photo

261big.jpg

Apparently where it all happened was to the extreme left of the above photo - really need to see a photo of the cliffs to the left.

You can't tell from this photo whether you are looking at rip tides, undertow, normal surf or whatever. You would need to see a video of the tidal movement to decide whether there was a rip tide there or not.

Water - having said the above - looks deepish there though? How deep does it get? Also, how far up the beach does the tide go - it looks as if it can go right around the bend?

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Apparently where it all happened was to the extreme left of the above photo - really need to see a photo of the cliffs to the left.

You can't tell from this photo whether you are looking at rip tides, undertow, normal surf or whatever. You would need to see a video of the tidal movement to decide whether there was a rip tide there or not.

Water - having said the above - looks deepish there though? How deep does it get? Also, how far up the beach does the tide go - it looks as if it can go right around the bend?

There really is a whole vocabulary with this and confusion with terms etc. I got this good snippet from Wiki P, worth a minute of anyones time:

In popular use the word "undertow" is sometimes applied to rip currents, which are responsible for the great majority of drownings close to beaches. When a swimmer enters a rip current, it starts to carry the person offshore. If the swimmer understands how to deal with this situation, he or she can easily exit the rip current by swimming at right angles to the flow, in other words swimming parallel to the shore, or by simply treading water or floating. However, if the swimmer does not know these simple solutions, or does not possess the necessary water skills, they may panic and drown, or they may exhaust themselves by trying unsuccessfully to swim directly against the flow.

On the United States Lifesaving Association website it is explained that some uses of the word "undertow" are incorrect:

"A rip current is a horizontal current. Rip currents do not pull people under the water–-they pull people away from shore. Drowning deaths occur when people pulled offshore are unable to keep themselves afloat and swim to shore. This may be due to any combination of fear, panic, exhaustion, or lack of swimming skills."

"In some regions rip currents are referred to by other, incorrect terms such as 'rip tides' and 'undertow'. We encourage exclusive use of the correct term – rip currents. Use of other terms may confuse people and negatively impact public education efforts

Rip currents are not rip tides and vice versa

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Basicly the rip`s are a function of the surf breaking ...you have a lot of water piling up onto the beach with every wave that breaks that water has to find a way back out to sea, this is were the rip comes from,if you look out to sea from the shore (on a surf beach) you will almost always see at least one gap/flat spot in the line of breaking waves this is where the rip will be, as the water flowing of the beach back out to sea flattens the waves

The irony of the above is that a lot of people look at the waves and think that looks dangerous there and then heads for the part of the beach that looks a lot safer as there are no or much smaller waves which is probably the most dangerous part of the beach

The worst rips will always be on narrow cove type beaches like Mawgan Porth when there`s a large surf running and they will generally be in the middle of the beach and along the rocks on each side of the beach

White sands bay in Pembrokeshire has been given nickname of the escalator by those who surf there, as when theres a good surf running the is no need to paddle to get out the back (beyond the breaking waves) as all you need to do is get close to the rocks on the right hand side of the bay and catch a ride out on the rip especially so when the tide is dropping/going out

PS the bigger the waves the stronger the rip

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  • 3 months later...

I got engrossed reading "top 10" lists recently and the one that stuck in my mind was the biggest killer/cause of drowning on the beach: rip tides. If you have'nt heard of them before they are basically a narrow channel in the sand that causes a powerful narrow current that pulls you away from the beach sometimes lasting upto 500 yards from the shore. Most people drown because they try to swim back to shore (against the rip) and get tired and drown. The easiest way to get out of the rip is to swim perpendicular to it so you get out of the rip or if it's too powerful to even do this let it take you out to sea as it will eventually lose force, then swim back to shore away from the channel.

riptide.gif

Figured out what it reminds me of; it's like saving for a house vs furious year on year rip-off hpi... best to not fight it and keep on going out (although with no way around), and let the 'they just wanted a home at mad price' buyers happily take on the rip.

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This thread has made me want a turntable again for the first time in many years! Re the vinyl, going to be a steep learning curve for me. I only kept about twenty albums for sentimental reasons, so will need to rebuild. Are all the new records of poor quality?? Which leaves me buying second hand original stuff, which I assume is a minefield of condition? Whichever..... I'm definitely getting back in :)

Get a good a good used one, and make sure your amplifier has a "phono" input! There are a few companies, releasing "good quality vinyl", mostly made in Germany or Japan! It's quite expensive though! One of my mates is very keen on it. I'm not so, as I think CD quality is entirely good enough, without the crackles! There's a "nostalgic" feel about putting on a record, as people my age remember this ritual!

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Get a good a good used one, and make sure your amplifier has a "phono" input! There are a few companies, releasing "good quality vinyl", mostly made in Germany or Japan! It's quite expensive though! One of my mates is very keen on it. I'm not so, as I think CD quality is entirely good enough, without the crackles! There's a "nostalgic" feel about putting on a record, as people my age remember this ritual!

OT?

Are you ripping LPs?

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