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British Engineers Produce Amazing 'petrol From Air' Technology


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Is this a hoax on par with ITV's celebrity cum?

So the company essentially manufacturer methanol from air and water. How?

It's not that difficult. You could go via CO2 + methane -> CO + H2 -> methanol

I think this is essentially the same thing. I think they're doing the same thing, but going CO2 + H2 -> CO + H2O then CO + H2 -> methanol

It's basically what someone in the business would call an on-board reformer. Not really new technology, and in truth you;d probably be better off stopping at methanol and using it as fuel for a fuel cell.

In fact this is pretty much nuts, all the reactions mentioned are done at high temperature/pressure. How do they get the high temperature? I guess they'd be planning on recovering the heat of combustion when they burn the petrol.

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I'm simply trying to say that your specific circumstances are relatively uncommon (or can be accommodated through viable alternatives), and don't constitute a good argument as to why electric cars are impractical for the general population.

Yes, for most people, long journeys are not that common. Many people only drive > 100 miles about once a month. But when they do decide to drive that far, they expect the car to work. If they buy an electric car, then they either will have to give up travelling long distances, or hire a car for those specific journeys. So they buy an expensive vehicle, and then pay extra to drive long distances. Or they get something like an Ampera, that costs a fortune, and get slightly worse economy than if they had bought a small diesel.

It simply doesn't make sense. Run the numbers....

Option 1 - I keep my very nice diesel. It cost £12k. It does about 1000 miles for £130, so £1300 a year to fuel it (10k miles). It costs about £200 a year to service it.

Option 2 - I buy a Nissan Leaf. It costs £28k. I will assume that the electricity is produced for free by faries, and the gnomes at the dealership service it out of the goodness of their hearts.

So after 10 years of driving the diesel, I've just about reached the capital cost of buying the electric car. I haven't had to hire any cars, I can drive 600 miles in one go, and it goes like stink.

Maybe in the future, electric cars will be dirt cheap, and everyone will have an extra car as a runabout. Right now, they're very expensive, and there is no case to buy one.

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Just been doing a bit of research on the Renault Dauphine and found this. In 1959 the worlds first production electric car was the Henney Kilowatt based on the popular Renault Dauphine..

henney_thumb.jpg

http://en.wikipedia....Henney_Kilowatt

The 1959 models all ran on a 36-volt system of 18 sequential two-volt batteries. The 36-volt cars had a top speed of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) and could run approximately 40 miles (64 km) on a full charge. After the 36-volt system was realized to be impractical, the Kilowatt drivetrain was redesigned by Eureka Williams as a 72-volt system for the 1960 model year. It employed 12 sequential six-volt batteries. The 72-volt models were much more practical than the 1959 36-volt models. The 1960 Kilowatt boasted a top speed of nearly 60 mph (97 km/h) with a range of over 60 miles (97 km) on a single charge.

Henney-kilowatt_patrimoine3.jpg

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Well, if the Abiotic oil people are correct and we cannot run out of oil then the accumulation rate of oil in the subsurface must be in the same ballpark as our current extraction rate.

Therefore the rate at which oil escapes from subsurface structures and leaks to the surface would have been similar before the oil industry was ever invented.

This oil would have to be oxidized to CO2, or we'd be up to our eyeballs in it.

This would deplete that atmosphere of oxygen in a geological eyeblink (~2 million years) - faster than any feasable way of renewing it.

And if you don't believe this, then consider that if this Abiotic oil really existed, then the refusal to use it would be costing western oil companies money. And this may surprise you, but BP, Shell, Exxon et al really, really like money.

Ah, ta, interesting take. Surely prior to the oil industry all those high pressure deposits would have been a significant problem in their own right?

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You've got a concept that can make some use of some of the electricity that's currently generated but not used and can be used with all the existing infrastructure and some people have a problem with the idea? Unless you've got a better way of storing excess energy production, beyond what can fit in with a very limited possible amount of pumped storage, then cheer this on. Batteries simply aren't up to the job and it's possible that all the effort needed to make sufficient batteries would render them an even less efficient storage mechanism anyway.

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I think people may have to accept that electric vehicles will never be a drop in replacement for existing four wheeled garden sheds. I can cycle to Manchester on perhaps 1kwh. E-bikes might well replace a lot of second cars. I'm not saying electric cars will be like glorified Sinclair C5's but bear in mind a Citroen 2CV only had a 20kW petrol engine and it was reasonably drivable. (I had a slightly more powerful twin pot Visa and it was a delight).

The electric cars you quote above are just electric versions of current petrol cars. Its not going to work. They are going to have to become lower, sleeker to combat air and rolling resistance. If you were to build a car to cope with average urban speeds you don't need anywhere near a 50kw electric motor.

Of course, if you build the ICE powered car sleeker, lighter etc then you need less power. Problem with the sleeker bit is that practical cars are pretty draggy when compared with say sailplanes but the sailplane doesn't have to negotiate city traffic so the only viable way to substantially cut the drag of cars is to make them smaller. Problem is that when Joe Bloggs goes to the showroom he is convinced that he needs as much sheet metal with as many frills as possible for his money. The antithesis of what is required to reduce enrgey consumption no matter where the energy comes from.

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Just been doing a bit of research on the Renault Dauphine and found this. In 1959 the worlds first production electric car was the Henney Kilowatt based on the popular Renault Dauphine..

henney_thumb.jpg

http://en.wikipedia....Henney_Kilowatt

Henney-kilowatt_patrimoine3.jpg

The 1960 Kilowatt boasted a top speed of nearly 60 mph (97 km/h) with a range of over 60 miles (97 km) on a single charge.

I would bet that in real terms it cost a helluva a lot less than todays EVs and the claimed performance is not that much worse. Not a lot of progress in half a century.

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