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24 YO Airline Pilot Earning 36K PA...

Most of my mates I went to uni are contracted in defence aerospace/Civvie aerospace, Most earn circa 20k, the junior eng managers are catching me up now... on around 26k. By the time they are thirty, they will be earning far more than me I expect...

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Guest muttley

All surveys where people have a choice as to whether or not they partake in the survey are skewed. Which is why surveys should not really be taken that seriously.

Absolutely!

Those that are doing well are only too happy to vote.

Someone should do a "How Big is Your Willy" poll and see if we get the national average.*

*9 inches

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Phaedrus

Whats the point of you fighting for fair prices on houses? You dont spend any time there!!!! And when you are there, all you do is sleep!!!

Anyway, good luck to everyone - I dont begrudge anyone a good wage. I answered honestly at £24,700 plus overtime. This year should make about £32-33K. Print trade is renowned for oveertime.

This is a GOOD WAGE for where I live (Liverpool). The average is approximately £18K p.a.

I know Im well paid for the area I live in but I am not jealous of someone earning £80,000 down South. My brothers Boss comes to Liverpool all the time and is on a good wedge but he said its a lot cheaper living in liverpool than where he is - think its around camden town?? Heard them talking about it so I am presuming it :).

I think the polls really throw the arguement of affordability out the windows when people disclose that they are on £50K plus salaries :(

TB

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I pay myself £4750 per year. (plus dividends), I probably take home the equivalent of someone on 65K, but I have to work f....ing hard for this.

If you are on 80K PAYE it is madness, most of it is going in tax. If you are paid that much presumerably you are important and can go see the Financial; Director and arrange to get paid in other ways. You would be better off dropping to 40K and having 40K + employeers NI @ 13.2% go into your pension.

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I should perhaps point out that my original post was refering to people in their early 30s.

Personally, if I'm earning mid 30K at 40 in my career I'd leave and start a different one!

GPs at 120K? Really? I know a few senior consultants in Guys & Tommies, have many mates who are now doctors or senior registras (penalty of having studied medicine for 4 years a Guys and Tommies, just before the 'shut' Guys - nice dump!). In my experience most of my old mates are now on about 60K, the 'friends of the family' consultants around 100K-200K (I expect but have never had the guts to ask!).

You must be doing some *serious* amount of call-out for 120K!

Its easy to explain. Thats the way our ****ed up NHS works. The average GP earns over 100k for a four day week. Anything difficult comes along and you refer them to an expert at the local hospital.

Meanwhile, those experts, surgeons and hospital physicians and the like, spend half their careers studying for difficult exams. Unless they become a consultant and devote time to private practise, they are doomed to earn less than their GP colleagues, despite having far more demanding jobs.

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All surveys where people have a choice as to whether or not they partake in the survey are skewed. Which is why surveys should not really be taken that seriously.

My point was in relation to this site and the nature of the debates here.

However, I still can't find any information I believe, about the distribution of income and actual earnings in this country.

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Its easy to explain. Thats the way our ****ed up NHS works. The average GP earns over 100k for a four day week. Anything difficult comes along and you refer them to an expert at the local hospital.

Meanwhile, those experts, surgeons and hospital physicians and the like, spend half their careers studying for difficult exams. Unless they become a consultant and devote time to private practise, they are doomed to earn less than their GP colleagues, despite having far more demanding jobs.

Its fecking outrageous that these so called experts can allegedly work all day at a hospital, have a round of golf and then rake it in at the local Bupa. W - A - N - K - E - R - S. They should all be shot, in most businesses you have a certain amount of work to do and if you havent done it at 5, you have to stay until its done. If this practice was stopped then the waiting lists would reduce very quickly.

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Its fecking outrageous that these so called experts can allegedly work all day at a hospital, have a round of golf and then rake it in at the local Bupa. W - A - N - K - E - R - S. They should all be shot, in most businesses you have a certain amount of work to do and if you havent done it at 5, you have to stay until its done. If this practice was stopped then the waiting lists would reduce very quickly.

Its a free country. If the government wont pay them properly, why shouldnt they work their weekends / evening in a bupa hospital?

You could pay yourself paye instead of dividends and maybe that 10k extra tax would help shorten the waiting lists.

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Its a free country. If the government wont pay them properly, why shouldnt they work their weekends / evening in a bupa hospital?

You could pay yourself paye instead of dividends and maybe that 10k extra tax would help shorten the waiting lists.

LOL

Point 1. They have been trained by the NHS using tax payers money. However I accept they should be paid a decent wage and it should be related to both patient throughput and results. I know a few consulatnts and they are taking the system for a ride.

Point 2. In order to pay myself dividends the company has to make a profit which has coorporation tax applied. So our govt gets it take, just less overall. Also, I employ a nubber of people that helps the govt, and most of our products are sold abroad generating real income. Docs are very much necessary of course but in a way they are just an overhead that if people looked after themselves (didnt smoke, and got of there lard arses and exercised) we would hardley need them.

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I am 26 and I earn 26K. To me that is not bad.

My field (uni academic/researcher) is very odd; quite sporadic, takes a long time to build up a reputation, wrestling with the peer review process, the struggle to get funds for project, a lot of frustration. I am (hopefully!) going to undertake some clinical training next year which will significantly improve my earning potential.

What I find hard is that I am very independent, have to set my own agenda, and don't get paid any extra for things I do. For example, I am reviewing manuscripts for a few different journals (some quite important). Don't get paid for it.

Even if I put together a decent grant proposal, the MRC budget in the UK for 04-05 was 420 million squids - when I was last in the US Bush anounced an increase in their NIH (National Institutes of Health) budgets in the region of tens of billion dollars. There's just not the money available; projects looking at cancer or heart disease are going to get the lion's share.

Anyway, that's just me whining about the drawbacks of my career choice! The reality is that like many people here I am scuppered. It doesn't matter how much you earn - even on 100K you'd only be able to get a 3 bed flat where I live, not even a house, and I live in Vauxhall, not Kennington or Clapham.

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What passes for normal depends on the circles that you travel in. In my final years of 9-to-5, I was making about 175-185K as a City contractor. Most people around me on the trading floor where on 80K-120K basic with 50-150% bonuses although we did have a few greenhorns on 30-40K basic we also had the odd MD on 500K. That is life in the City, like it or not.

Also, I'd like to add that most people who earn over 80K would take every opportunity to vote in a poll like that, because they feel superior being in the top rung. Human nature.

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Busted :D

The Carlyle Group owns your ass anyway, I hope you get stock options <_<

The point being that a number of people on here can afford to buy a house outright or service a mortgage without having to resort to eating tins of cold baked beans, that doesn't mean it's a good idea to buy though, some have done the exact opposite. Why fall over yourself to buy in at the top of market, even if you can afford to, it would be like buying dotcom shares on the 10th March 2000.

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Also, I'd like to add that most people who earn over 80K would take every opportunity to vote in a poll like that, because they feel superior being in the top rung. Human nature.

I suspect it's right that people doing well are more likely to own up to their income (especially when it's comfortably anonymous), though it won't often be about feeling superior... more like being proud of their achievements, which is fair enough.

Not that earning a lot is necessarily an achievement in itself (no point having lots of income if you have no time and more stress than the San Andreas fault), but it's the way we tend to keep score, and it's not a bad indicator of the effort people have put into their lives, their skills/talent, and perhaps (to an extent) their good fortune in either genes or circumstances.

I'm 42 (not the answer to life, the universe, or anything so far) and my wages for this 4 week period, working nights, have just dropped into my bank account... £975.01, which is pretty typical. If I work 7 day weeks it rises to more like £1300, but I only do that in financial emergencies these day now the flat's mortgage is paid off.

Obviously I've not made the wisest decisions when it comes to investing my education, time, and effort since dragging my reluctant brain through university in the early 80s. But I have a lot more coming in than I need, which is all that matters, and maybe one day 20 years of beating my head against a creative brick wall will yield more than just a headache and lots of bruises.

Though if I keep distracting myself by reading HPC on my nights off I may well still be here in fifteen years' time waiting for the *next* crash and my chance to move somewhere with a better view than the back of a shopping centre. Better furk off & do some work... or clean my keyboard again... and then there's the washing-up... and by then Declan might have something interesting to say.

Andrew McP

PS Chances are the poll will be distorted by the fact that people with a good income are probably all too aware that you don't get that income for nothing and in this fragile economy you can't rely on it forever. So spending it wisely is important... hence a reluctance to throw money at a housing bubble, and a habit of hanging around here when not busy doing the earning thing. They'll also a lot more likely to have the education (or simple common sense) to do extensive research before making big decisions, making them more likely to end up somewhere like here.

Either that or most of them are lying. :-)

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i said banking IT contractor, not NHS or aerospace etc. go on jobserve and do an search on contract IT city bank, the average rate is 400-700 pd.

This is true. I am an average IT banking contractor.

My colleagues rates vary between £400 per day and £800 per day. I find myself in the middle of that bracket.

Mind you it's stressful yet tedious and you can expect to get kicked out on a corporate whim. Then rehired a week later for a higher rate

<_<

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What this thread tells me is that there are some good salaries out there, I think mostly in the south east. I live in Gwent/Monmouthshire and salaries are much lower. But I work in the South East where house prices are similar to where I live.

Soon I will start a new position in South Wales with a drop in salary but still with house prices similar to SE England - I feel sorry for me!!

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LOL

Point 1. They have been trained by the NHS using tax payers money. However I accept they should be paid a decent wage and it should be related to both patient throughput and results. I know a few consulatnts and they are taking the system for a ride.

Point 2. In order to pay myself dividends the company has to make a profit which has coorporation tax applied. So our govt gets it take, just less overall. Also, I employ a nubber of people that helps the govt, and most of our products are sold abroad generating real income. Docs are very much necessary of course but in a way they are just an overhead that if people looked after themselves (didnt smoke, and got of there lard arses and exercised) we would hardley need them.

Both fair comments, although its probably pushing it a bit far to say be hardly need docs.

In my experience its the GPs who take the p!ss, which was the point of my first post. Perhaps thats because most of the hospital docs I know are still climbing the greasy pole as SHOs or registrars at London teaching hospitals, while their GP contemporaries are live the life of Riley in cosey rural partnerships, earning a lot more for a lot less work and stress despite having fewer qualifications.

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This is true. I am an average IT banking contractor.

My colleagues rates vary between £400 per day and £800 per day. I find myself in the middle of that bracket.

Mind you it's stressful yet tedious and you can expect to get kicked out on a corporate whim. Then rehired a week later for a higher rate

<_<

Ditto, husband does the same. You also get the all of the tax benefits of running your own company.

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Guys,

Please can we lay off the "liars" and "talking sh1T" stuff (although I realise willing's post was reasonably well intentioned). One of the best things about this site is the integrity of the posters (well, most of them). Even PG is not called a liar!

BTW, I think many of us considered ticking a LOWER salary box to blend with the norm and avoid this very debate developing. In the end I ticked the top box because I am honest. Those who have read Michael Lewis' book, "Liar's Poker" will have realised what he realised while working in the City in London and NY in the 80s - "there is no such thing as wealth, just new levels of relative poverty"! There is always someone better off/paid than you. Just be happy we have jobs and health.

Those who are amazed at the salary levels of some people are now educated. Those have a gripe, that's life I'm afraid. Lets move on - it is a coarse subject to discuss in public!

PS imagine the posts if the poll had had bands going up towards seven figures! I am sure we would have had some population of those and a good thing too. It shows the HPC site is not just about disgruntled earners/FTBs on the average wage but about affordability and value full stop, whatever your age.

Edited by Tempest
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This is true. I am an average IT banking contractor.

My colleagues rates vary between £400 per day and £800 per day. I find myself in the middle of that bracket.

Mind you it's stressful yet tedious and you can expect to get kicked out on a corporate whim. Then rehired a week later for a higher rate

<_<

I was under the impression that most London banks have scaled back their use of contractors since the good days in 99/2000. Have rates come down over the last few years? Is it harder to get work than it used to be?

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I was under the impression that most London banks have scaled back their use of contractors since the good days in 99/2000. Have rates come down over the last few years? Is it harder to get work than it used to be?

My huband earns around £100-150/day less than he used to in the good old days but it obviously still suits us fine. There seems to be plenty of work around but the expectations and interviews have got harder, he has increased his skills so can work in a variety of areas, he refuses to do front office support now.

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Interesting thread this one, especially considering that I am currently looking for a new job, and salary levels are constantly on my mind at the moment.

Firstly, I have a golden rule:

I NEVER tell anyone my salary. It is a vulgar measure at best, which society has always tried to underpin a level of importance against. I really don’t know what my friends and family earn. Hell, I don’t even know how much my own girlfriend earns.

When you undertake a salary survey on an anonymous site like this, of course the high earners are going to be keen to post and this will skew the results somewhat.

I have seen the average salary in the UK quoted as £17k, £22k, £26k….there are various different ways of measuring these things. What I did think was interesting was the % of people earning under the average salary…somewhere around 70% ! I guess that this probably should come as no surprise, we are a pseudo-capitalist society, and a by product of this is that you are always going to have the guys at the top of the ladder earning tens of millions distorting the figures.

And for the "I am an IT contractor in London and I earn £xxx per day at a major bank” crowd….you are not truly representative of the IT market. You are working in one of the world’s main financial capitals for a cash-rich institution, in a specialist niche, in one of the highest risk environments (no pension, no paid holiday, no notice period, long hours, etc). That is about as good as it is going to gets for you guys, make no mistake !! I believe that these are very much the golden times for these sort of jobs; there are no real barriers to entry and the market could easily become flooded with labour which will see an adjustment in market rates. Whilst IT work might be relatively demanding and require a fair degree of technical skill, it is not a profession in the same way that (say) law or medicine is, and you don’t have to train for 7 years to become qualified.

The following site has some figures for IT contractors

http://www.itjobswatch.co.uk/default.aspx?...=0&q=&id=0&jt=1

You can see that the averages for banking are higher than other areas, but overall, one has to conclude that average pay for IT seems to hover around the early 40s,

Edited by Nico
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  • 439 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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