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so can anyone buy a house in Ireland from the UK Mainland? no need for a work points system or similar like moving to Aus ?

Girlfriend is a nurse, we both love the great outdoors, cycling,running,walking etc. Cheap houses in the countryside mmm sounds tempting.

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so can anyone buy a house in Ireland from the UK Mainland? no need for a work points system or similar like moving to Aus ?

Girlfriend is a nurse, we both love the great outdoors, cycling,running,walking etc. Cheap houses in the countryside mmm sounds tempting.

Nah, you just move over - that's the best part about being part of Europe.

What I did was to first find a job, came over for the interview on the plane - got the job and moved over. Simples.

You will need to get a PPI number, that's the same as a national insurance number. IMO if you are an average or below average <$50k Euro earner then you are much better off here than the UK.

If you are on benefits or tax credits (same thing) then you would be worse off. High earners $>50k will also be worse off.

The outdoors is great here and the people are friendly, they also have pubs that have people in them during the week + weekend. Fewer Chavs and lowlifes too.

Certainly worth a holiday if you have never been.

[Edit] - I cant speak for Dublin as I know nothing about it.

Edited by Gone to Ireland.
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Have been to Cork area three times about 10-15 years ago, ran the Ballycotton 10 a couple of times and the other time was when the foot and mouth outbreak was on and it was cancelled. Travelled as far as the dingle penisula I think.

We're not on benefits or tax credits both sub £30k earners over in East Anglia area.

I wouldn't mind having a crack at something like forestry work or something outdoors, or possibly working from home (but with a lovely outdoors environment)

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Nah, you just move over - that's the best part about being part of Europe.

What I did was to first find a job, came over for the interview on the plane - got the job and moved over. Simples.

You will need to get a PPI number, that's the same as a national insurance number. IMO if you are an average or below average <$50k Euro earner then you are much better off here than the UK.

If you are on benefits or tax credits (same thing) then you would be worse off. High earners $>50k will also be worse off.

The outdoors is great here and the people are friendly, they also have pubs that have people in them during the week + weekend. Fewer Chavs and lowlifes too.

Certainly worth a holiday if you have never been.

[Edit] - I cant speak for Dublin as I know nothing about it.

Is it worth asking how the weather's been since you moved there?

I assume terrible, as it's been terrible in the UK.

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You will find most of Northern Europe is about the same except for far southeast regions.

Last summer was a washout, not really what we needed after just moving here.

Autumn was not to bad all in all.

Xmas was a little better.

Between Jan and March we had no rain at all over in the west and no snow! That was caused be the easterly winds.

It was that dry that there were fires breaking out.

http://www.thejournal.ie/gorse-fires-galway-853376-Apr2013/

The last couple of days irts been a bit rainy with sunshine and sudden short downpours, tomorrow looks like sun all day.

All in all the weather is similar to Cornwall over in the west. I think Dublin is simlar to London and Wexford/Waterford is similar to kent.

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I used to live in Cornwall then I moved away because there was/is no IT work. I ended up in Dover, then got pissed off with that as I didnt want to be there - we just ended up there.

Decided to give Ireland a try as there is a good number of IT jobs here compared to more rural area of the UK.

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I used to live in Cornwall then I moved away because there was/is no IT work. I ended up in Dover, then got pissed off with that as I didnt want to be there - we just ended up there.

Decided to give Ireland a try as there is a good number of IT jobs here compared to more rural area of the UK.

What IT skills are sought in Galway and approximately what do they pay?

Not sure I could stand the climate but it does look lovely in many respects.

In the Google images the sunshine has that "thin" look to it which means that 10 months f the year you need a jacket. :-)

Edit, to be fair the images were taken in February.

Edited by swissy_fit
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What sort of rent would a place like this get?

http://www.odonnjoyce.com/residential/brochure/2462195

It'd surely be easy to rent out to a load of nurses or students?

How easy it to get the dole or Housing benefit? I hear its VERY generous over there

I'm sure they'll be delighted to welcome a wannabe BTL landlord looking to exploit their welfare system.

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What sort of rent would a place like this get?

http://www.odonnjoyce.com/residential/brochure/2462195

It'd surely be easy to rent out to a load of nurses or students?

How easy it to get the dole or Housing benefit? I hear its VERY generous over there

That will go for around €120k and will let out for around €700 to €800.

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You will find most of Northern Europe is about the same except for far southeast regions.

Last summer was a washout, not really what we needed after just moving here.

Autumn was not to bad all in all.

Xmas was a little better.

Between Jan and March we had no rain at all over in the west and no snow! That was caused be the easterly winds.

It was that dry that there were fires breaking out.

http://www.thejournal.ie/gorse-fires-galway-853376-Apr2013/

The last couple of days irts been a bit rainy with sunshine and sudden short downpours, tomorrow looks like sun all day.

All in all the weather is similar to Cornwall over in the west. I think Dublin is simlar to London and Wexford/Waterford is similar to kent.

You have done better recently than further East.

Race meetings at Tramore 14th and Tipperary today were both abandoned due to waterlogging

http://www.goracing.ie/HRI/Resource-Centre/News-Items/Waterford---Tramore-Rescheduled-For-Saturday-20th-April/

http://www.goracing.ie/HRI/Resource-Centre/News-Items/Tipperary-Rescheduled-for-Wednesday-(Evening)-1st-May-to-Form-a-2-Day-Meeting/

At least in Ireland they are capable of rescheduling the meetings instead of losing them!

Edit the 2nd link doesn't work I think because of the bracket?

Edited by Democorruptcy
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That will go for around €120k and will let out for around €700 to €800.

Hmmm... not bad - a 6 or 7% income yield, and prices seem to have bottomed out there too so there is likely to be a bit of capital gain over the next few years.

Worth considering... always nice to have someone else pay for a potential retirement home on the Atlantic coast

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Prices may have bottomed out, but there will be lots of stock coming to market over the next few years. there are over 20,000 people who have not been paying their mortgage for over two years and the law has just been changed (curtsey of the Troika), so those houses will be repossessed.

That's why I am not upset about the house that we were trying to buy falling through.

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All in all the weather is similar to Cornwall over in the west. I think Dublin is simlar to London and Wexford/Waterford is similar to kent.

As warm as Cornwall in Galway?

Wow, I had no idea, assumed it would be similar in style but a lot colder.

I liked the Cornish climate when I lived down there, it seemed to be either raining(often) or sunny(also often) with not much grey dry weather.

Edit : I just checked, the climate figures around Saltash area where I lived are indeed slightly warmer in winter than Galway, lowest monthly average daily minimum is 3.8 as opposed to 1.8 but the two are a lot closer than I supposed.

Edited by swissy_fit
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Am i right in thinking west Ireland is well - further west than the mainland uk so benefits a little more from the effects of the Jet stream?

Gulf Stream.

West of Ireland can grow certain plants that are otherwise only found around the Med - I think strawberry tree and andigena potato are two.

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All in all the weather south of Dublin Galway is about the same as the south of Birmingham - little difference really when you compare the like of the UK to hot places like Portugal/Italy.

UK, Ireland, Netherlands, Germany, Poland - all around the same really.

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All in all the weather south of Dublin Galway is about the same as the south of Birmingham - little difference really when you compare the like of the UK to hot places like Portugal/Italy.

UK, Ireland, Netherlands, Germany, Poland - all around the same really.

If you say so, it's true that none of those places are hot.

I find the small local differences make quite a big difference to the feel of a climate.

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If you say so, it's true that none of those places are hot.

I find the small local differences make quite a big difference to the feel of a climate.

That is true, I have found that local climate can be quite different even within one county, for example my Father lives in Roche, Cornwall and it is ALWAYS foggy/misty, where other areas are not.

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If you say so, it's true that none of those places are hot.

I find the small local differences make quite a big difference to the feel of a climate.

Yeah, I've got that here on the south coast - noticeably colder at the end of a 30 mile drive in the morning, in every direction.

I think the point about Ireland is that its winter temps are very mild (although not in the past few years).

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Before we moved up to Scotland the lady who ran a B&B we stayed at a few times told us Elgin had a micro-climate and the bad weather often stopped the other side of the River Spey. The night we moved up it was snowing heavily so we avoided the Cairngorms and went around past Aberdeen. The snow was awful and there was a fatal accident 4 cars in front of us on the A96 that held us up for an hour as the snow piled up. We crossed the River Spey at Fochabers and then there was no snow, it was just wet. I never knew a river could do that!

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Prices may have bottomed out, but there will be lots of stock coming to market over the next few years. there are over 20,000 people who have not been paying their mortgage for over two years and the law has just been changed (curtsey of the Troika), so those houses will be repossessed.

That's why I am not upset about the house that we were trying to buy falling through.

Think you got lucky. Irish market long way to fall yet...introduction of property tax next month will tip it even further south. This despite despairing efforts of vested interest to propagate the notion that Ireland has differential housing markets a la England and the south east in UK, and hence "good areas" are rising.. Being looking at some stock in suburban Dublin on my travels lately...

http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=708758

http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=710151

http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=706593

http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=709701

http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=709285

http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=697306

Popping down to Galway in few weeks, will see what the craic is there..

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Those properties are look quite reasonable for Dublin. I am over in Galway as I am not keen on cities and prefer to live in small (1500 person) towns/villages.

AIB hiked interest rates today, they currently issue near to 50% of mortgages so that was great news:

http://www.irishtimes.com/business/sectors/financial-services/aib-rate-hike-to-hit-tens-of-thousands-1.1371573

It is nice that the Troika are in control after years of the British government printing money and deliberately f***ing things up for me, yes there is some pain here but I feel that it is more equally spread amongst the old, young private and public sector.

I am not optimistic about prices here, but my general feeling is that property is somewhat more affordable here than back in the south of the UK.

Currently the biggest problem here with the housing market is that the banks are the biggest player and control most of the stock, because so many are in negative equity they are out of the market.

Many of those in arrears (100,000+ in 90 days) should have been repossessed freeing up much needed stock of quality properties, but the banks and government have been holding back. That looks like it is changing albeit slowly,

http://www.independent.ie/business/personal-finance/property-mortgages/new-law-will-allow-banks-to-repossess-homes-by-summer-29162034.html

You hardly see any good houses in good locations for sale, not because the current occupier was prudent, but they are clinging on for dear life and only a forced eviction would get them out, in the meantime crappy stock is coming to market as people have just abandoned them and left.

My theory is once the repos. start then we will see the good stock come to market. I dont think that they will affect prices much as credit will be eased at the same time (I think).

PM me if you want to meet up for a pint whilst in Galway,

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