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http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2088-1838612,00.html

"The renationalisation of Britain’s economy continues apace. Figures from the stockbrokers William de Broë, based on official statistics, show that in the northeast, Yorkshire and the Humber, the northwest, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, the state accounts for more than 50% of the economy, in some cases significantly more."

"They don’t get it, either, about red tape. Mr Johnson made another announcement last week that sent shudders through the small firms that are the lifeblood of the economy. Paid maternity leave is to be raised from six to nine months and then to a year by the end of the parliament. More significantly, fathers will be entitled to take up to three months of paternity leave now, rising to six months by the time of the next election. Only ministers who have never run anything could inflict this kind of burden on small firms."

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"They don’t get it, either, about red tape. Mr Johnson made another announcement last week that sent shudders through the small firms that are the lifeblood of the economy. Paid maternity leave is to be raised from six to nine months and then to a year by the end of the parliament. More significantly, fathers will be entitled to take up to three months of paternity leave now, rising to six months by the time of the next election. Only ministers who have never run anything could inflict this kind of burden on small firms."

It shouldn't be a "burden", because a properly run and managed company will already be offering paternity to leave to those of its employees who need it. In fact, the new legislation will be helpful to them, as there will some additional money from the government to pay paternity pay.

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It shouldn't be a "burden", because a properly run and managed company will already be offering paternity to leave to those of its employees who need it. In fact, the new legislation will be helpful to them, as there will some additional money from the government to pay paternity pay.

The so called money from government will come from taxes, great! Shackle business withmore legislation, who needs flexibility in todays business environment, oh and lets spend more money while we are at it. As for not being a "burden" I think you will agree your notion of properly run and managed companies is an abstract ideal of the real world which only confirms that such legislation though maybe ethically well intended is quite removed from the reailty of keeping a business a float and making money, so well one can pay all those pesky taxes.

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It shouldn't be a "burden", because a properly run and managed company will already be offering paternity to leave to those of its employees who need it

Sophistry.

Try running a small business with 4 or 5 key employees when one of them takes paternity leave. The people who shape this irresponsible legislation have simply no idea about the impossible strain this may place on SME companies.

Edited by Red Baron

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All work is now subcontracted. Best move I ever made.

Exactly!

We were so sick to death of Government belligerence, interference and red tape, that we now outsource every single aspect of our business and have prospered as a result.

The jobs that might have gone to UK employees are now done much more cheaply offshore.

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Guest Time 2 raise Interest Rates

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2088-1838612,00.html

"They don’t get it, either, about red tape. Mr Johnson made another announcement last week that sent shudders through the small firms that are the lifeblood of the economy. Paid maternity leave is to be raised from six to nine months and then to a year by the end of the parliament. More significantly, fathers will be entitled to take up to three months of paternity leave now, rising to six months by the time of the next election. Only ministers who have never run anything could inflict this kind of burden on small firms."

A bit controversial this one, but it might not be such a bad idea. It's

probably the only chance the parents will get to spend time with their

children before it gets turfed off to the child minder, and the grandparents

due to the horrendous debts weighing down on the parents' shoulders.

Unless they're happily renting that is. :D

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Exactly!

We were so sick to death of Government belligerence, interference and red tape, that we now outsource every single aspect of our business and have prospered as a result.

The jobs that might have gone to UK employees are now done much more cheaply offshore.

What kind of people are you employing mate? They must really hate you. Everyone I work with would not consider landing our employer in that kind of situation. Rights have nothing to do with it.

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employers will simply subcontract.

the only people able to get this will be the usual non-jobbers.

its a policy for policys sake.

housing crisis - now thats a problem they should be dealing with.

if prices were not so squewed then 1 parent could stay at home perm.

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Try running a small business with 4 or 5 key employees when one of them takes paternity leave. The people who shape this irresponsible legislation have simply no idea about the impossible strain this may place on SME companies.

I would have thought that most small business would start with 1 or 2 staff, I don’t believe that any company of that size could survive if one of it’s employees went off for 6 months (presuming they are trained staff and not the equivalent of cleaners). I personally started up 4 years ago and had just 1 employee (who I trained from scratch) – I soon realized that I would not be able to continue if he was away for more than 2 weeks, so I packed it in 1 year ago. How many small businesses will not bother to continue (or even start) because of red tape and bad staff that you cannot sack – this is not the way the country should be heading, as small businesses are the future.

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employers will simply subcontract.

the only people able to get this will be the usual non-jobbers.

its a policy for policys sake.

housing crisis - now thats a problem they should be dealing with.

if prices were not so squewed then 1 parent could stay at home perm.

I know for nurses or anyone paid around £1k a month, its cheaper to just leave work unpaid than to work and pay childcare. Although that is probably no longer possible as one wage cant support a house anymore.

I probably would have considered children in my mid 20s if money wasnt so tight, i have given up with the thought of marriage as its too expensive.

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Sophistry.

Try running a small business with 4 or 5 key employees when one of them takes paternity leave. The people who shape this irresponsible legislation have simply no idea about the impossible strain this may place on SME companies.

What are you going to do if your key employee falls under a bus? Do the same thing. A properly run business can manage without any one person.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

What are you going to do if your key employee falls under a bus? Do the same thing. A properly run business can manage without any one person.

Are you a successful small businessman?, if not, you should really not make such wild statements.

<_<

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Guest Bart of Darkness
What are you going to do if your key employee falls under a bus? Do the same thing. A properly run business can manage without any one person.

Unless they are a sole trader of course!

I find it amusing to be lectured on how to run a business by a NuLabour sock puppet. :P

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I probably would have considered children in my mid 20s if money wasnt so tight, i have given up with the thought of marriage as its too expensive.

no one can now admit that there isnt a problem with the way the uk works.

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What are you going to do if your key employee falls under a bus? Do the same thing. A properly run business can manage without any one person.

It’s a bit different training up a replacement for a dead employee – rather than spending 6 months training a temp employee who will only work for 9 months and probably expect more money and work less.

You probably think that small businesses would choose when employing a man or woman would just pick the one who would be best at the job (no jokes about who would have the biggest assets)

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It shouldn't be a "burden", because a properly run and managed company will already be offering paternity to leave to those of its employees who need it. In fact, the new legislation will be helpful to them,

'the new legislation will be helpful to them'

Zorn, the new legislation will be most welcome by the workers, the Chinese workers that is, as a result of it being too expensive to do business in the UK. All these benefits have to be paid for.

When you next shop - around for something, I hope you will be glad to pay the extra costs charged by the UK supplier. Can you honestly say this will be the case?

The UK economy isn`t a closed system you know.

What are you going to do if your key employee falls under a bus? Do the same thing. A properly run business can manage without any one person.

Zorn me old hippocrite.

Next time you are on the end of bad service due to staff shortages, dont you dare complain. Instead, compliment the firm for offering flexible working practices that in the real world leads to service outages.

You are text - book Man. Communism also works......... in books.

Edited by dogbox

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Next time you are on the end of bad service due to staff shortages, dont you dare complain. Instead, compliment the firm for offering flexible working practices that in the real world leads to service outages.

A well-run company also has plans in place to cope with staff shortages. And paternity leave is the easiest thing in the world to plan around, since you're going to get several months' notice. Any company that can't cope with paternity leave is going to have much much worse problems coping with sickness and accidents, for which you don't tend to get any notice at all.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

A well-run company also has plans in place to cope with staff shortages. And paternity leave is the easiest thing in the world to plan around, since you're going to get several months' notice. Any company that can't cope with paternity leave is going to have much much worse problems coping with sickness and accidents, for which you don't tend to get any notice at all.

You just don`t get it, do you ?

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What are you going to do if your key employee falls under a bus? Do the same thing. A properly run business can manage without any one person.

I'm guessing you've never run a small business?

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What are you going to do if your key employee falls under a bus? Do the same thing. A properly run business can manage without any one person.

Yes, just, however whats at issue is the costs involved to employer.

Employee leaves on maternity leave; two choices:

1. Recruit staff on temporary contract for 9 Months, agency fees cost = 15-20% of annual salary (£25,000 = say £4,000); add in the cost of training (both in supervisor and employee time) and the cost is rapidly heading towards £10,000 for the average employee.

2. Reorganise work flow, however for a small firm (say 5 employees) this means 20% more work for everybody (or a extra day per week).

Edited by Young Goat

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I will never forget the panic attacks my uncle (who built and owns a sucessful small exporting factory) started having as the mountain of red tape and legislation and penalties grew. After collapsing twice in the supermarket with 13 employees and his irreplaceable work skills, he decided to simply forget for the sake of his health his plans of expanding production and raising more sales, and simply fire his 11 employees. He retained just 2 key workers and himself working 80-90 hour weeks meeting orders and manage the backlog.

Small business owners can not deal with endless red tape, and as they alreadly work 110% full time on the operation of their business in the face of competion.

Lets see what the real cost of the regulation was to society: 9 workers have lost ther jobs. The company found it could not afford the adminstrative burden and real cost in terms of lost key worker time to expand production - even when it could increase orders, as the real costs directly due to the increasing administration on a small business were too much in addtion to training workers etc..

The small company had to take a decision just to keep it all going in the face of losing KEY time from the owner spent on all the form filling. Thats what Nu Labour will never get - the concept of a business owner somehow not being of the idle class with time on his hands to fill in masses of paper.

As you see the tise of all this legistlation rise and rise you are goin to see many small business simple give up as they cannot find time to keep thier edge over competition which is full time, and comply with all this stuff. I think we are past that point now.

What would be interesting is to work out what proportion of GDP depends on the shoulders of small businesses. That proportion is likely to go.

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Sophistry.

Try running a small business with 4 or 5 key employees when one of them takes paternity leave. The people who shape this irresponsible legislation have simply no idea about the impossible strain this may place on SME companies.

Not really surprising when most ministers experience of work is as a trade union "researchers" (eg Milburn, Hain, Blunkett) plus the odd poly lecturer. Even Blair was only a barrister for a short time and this hardly gives him a view of how a normal business runs...

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I have a very good friend who runs a small engineering firm. He is finding it very difficult to expand because if they take on one more worker they will reach a threshold and have to spend 100k on new equipment to comply with the HSE regulations.

(They don't have HSE regulations in china)

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I have a very good friend who runs a small engineering firm. He is finding it very difficult to expand because if they take on one more worker they will reach a threshold and have to spend 100k on new equipment to comply with the HSE regulations.

(They don't have HSE regulations in china)

in engineering id say HSE is important. most engineering firms start as one man bands, with friends family as they expand. they are ok with casual working practices, but to ask a mainline employee to adopt the same lacklustre attention to safety is another matter.

china doesnt have HSE but they do have the hong kong phooey book of kung fu.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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