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Councils Could Seize Empty Homes

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4364184.stm

Councils could seize empty homes

Houses left empty by owners for more than a year could be seized and leased by local authorities under new plans. Empty dwelling management orders would allow councils to seize, renovate and lease a property for up to seven years, before returning it to its owner.

The plans are expected to become law in April next year.

It emerged last week that almost 700,000 homes are empty in England, of which 280,000 have been deserted for more than 12 months......

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Its in the Housing Act 2004. Quite a few interesting things in the Act - vendors packs; a deposit scheme; increased powers for local authorities to deal with empty properties and changes to housing standards.

http://www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odp...age/035228.hcsp

A relatively good piece of legislation.

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Its in the Housing Act 2004. Quite a few interesting things in the Act - vendors packs; a deposit scheme; increased powers for local authorities to deal with empty properties and changes to housing standards.

http://www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odp...age/035228.hcsp

A relatively good piece of legislation.

I doubt it if the council will be able to take over properties as easily as many people would fight them all the way to courts, which in turn would cost the council thousands of £££'s.

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I don't think this will work. If the house isn't in tip top condition then the council will not have the money to get it up to a standard (re: decent homes policy) in order to rent out.

The council will be more interested in their own property than someone elses and yes.. legal cost could be a factor.

The legislation should place the emphasis on the owner, not the council. Legislation to force owners to either rent/sell/get up to standard etc could be done through the courts without the need for the council to gain ownership.

Typical NL..all talk..no action

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I don't think this will work. If the house isn't in tip top condition then the council will not have the money to get it up to a standard (re: decent homes policy) in order to rent out.

The council will be more interested in their own property than someone elses and yes.. legal cost could be a factor.

The legislation should place the emphasis on the owner, not the council. Legislation to force owners to either rent/sell/get up to standard etc could be done through the courts without the need for the council to gain ownership.

Typical NL..all talk..no action

I believe that councils already have (and exercise) the power to fund the upgrade of property in exchange for the landlord taking Housing benefit tenants.

I know the council in my local area gave money to a landlord to upgrade some flats above some shops that had been used for storage for years.

The result is that the landlord gets a guaranteed rental income and the council gets a greater supply of housing to offer homeless local people after much of council housing stock has been sold off.

I am sure that sticking to this arrangement incurs a far reduced risk to the council.

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Will they be adding the empty homes they seize to their own stock of empty homes?

In case it isn't clear, councils are very much the guilty party when it comes to leaving homes empty.

Good post!

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4364184.stm

Councils could seize empty homes

This will just be another of the "waves" that will knock down the housing sandcastle.

People will blame the extra supply of property provided by the council as one of the reasons for the slump.

Either way, it's not a good thing for landlords, certainly the shape of things to come.

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Will they be adding the empty homes they seize to their own stock of empty homes?

In case it isn't clear, councils are very much the guilty party when it comes to leaving homes empty.

Thats true. In my local area, I can see numerous council owned houses ( 50+ ) boarded up and vacant for years now. They are in Reigate which is supposedly one of the most expensive areas in the country outside London.

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Thats true. In my local area, I can see numerous council owned houses ( 50+ ) boarded up and vacant for years now. They are in Reigate which is supposedly one of the most expensive areas in the country outside London.

Reigate?

http://www.reigate-banstead.gov.uk/Images/..._tcm5-11050.pdf

This reigate? or is there another...

Seems to have a nice leaflet about dealing with empty homes.

http://www.reigate-banstead.gov.uk/public/...ng_Health_Care/

see that also - they say there is a shortage of homes in the borough so if what you say is true then something seems to be wrong.

You wouldn't be picking on a tory area by any chance?

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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