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On 06/06/2020 at 18:00, JoeDavola said:

Very interesting - thanks for the info.

I thought it looked like an 80's/90's kitchen and from what you're saying I was right.

There's an odd thing about houses that were built in recent decades where they sometimes seem to date moreso than houses built say 60 plus years ago....the 'aesthetics' used look very much 'of their time' and not in a good way.

Structurally I'm sure it's of good quality; certainly better than what's going up nowadays. Just think the price is ridiculous for what you're getting.

I just don't get how you can say a house built 30 years ago is of better quality than a house built today. I have been around in the industry, almost that length of time and I can assure you that is not at all the case. I (obviously biased) believe the company I work for builds quality homes. However what we build now is way ahead of what we or indeed the industry in general was building when I started.

Thirty years ago there was basic insulation and little notion of air tightness. Presure treated timber and kiln dried joists were not in circulation. ground floor insulation was not in the building regs. 

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16 minutes ago, BelfastVI said:

I just don't get how you can say a house built 30 years ago is of better quality than a house built today. I have been around in the industry, almost that length of time and I can assure you that is not at all the case. I (obviously biased) believe the company I work for builds quality homes. However what we build now is way ahead of what we or indeed the industry in general was building when I started.

Thirty years ago there was basic insulation and little notion of air tightness. Presure treated timber and kiln dried joists were not in circulation. ground floor insulation was not in the building regs. 

People will give forgive the draft and the heating being on a extra hour a day for the larger room space, garden and sound proofing. I know I do. I'm not talking about donegal Avenue terraces btw. 

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4 hours ago, 2buyornot2buy said:

People will give forgive the draft and the heating being on a extra hour a day for the larger room space, garden and sound proofing. I know I do. I'm not talking about donegal Avenue terraces btw. 

Larger room and garden size are not "structural" or "quality issues". They are size issues. You could buy a small house 30 years ago and you can buy one now. I am not sure if there is data to show the average size of housing over the years. Perhaps LPS might have that sort of info but I don't recall ever seeing it. 

As for sound proofing it was not a big item of cencern 20 or 30 years ago. There was very little, that I recall in the old Building Regs concerning sound.  I know we have more apartments now (people living above and below) but we had just as many semi and town houses or terrase housing back then. In recent years it is certainly a big issue. I will not go through all the steps and when they have been introduced but they are signficant. 

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45 minutes ago, BelfastVI said:

Larger room and garden size are not "structural" or "quality issues". They are size issues. You could buy a small house 30 years ago and you can buy one now. I am not sure if there is data to show the average size of housing over the years. Perhaps LPS might have that sort of info but I don't recall ever seeing it. 

As for sound proofing it was not a big item of cencern 20 or 30 years ago. There was very little, that I recall in the old Building Regs concerning sound.  I know we have more apartments now (people living above and below) but we had just as many semi and town houses or terrase housing back then. In recent years it is certainly a big issue. I will not go through all the steps and when they have been introduced but they are signficant. 

Quality isn't just measured by how well a tradesman fits a skirting board. Though building defects are a measure of poor quality. Size is a quality attribute. Lots of things make up "quality" when comparing similar objects, e.g. houses. If I'm comparing a 1890 detached and one recently built room size, garden etc are all valid measures of quality. I don't have access to NHBC claim data but it's a significant enough problem for them to introduce gagging clauses on settlements

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/business/2017/feb/16/new-home-owners-gagged-over-poor-build-and-compensation-claims

Average house size by house type have been decreasing in the UK for years. 

Obviously you can say but look we demolished all those terraces and build townhouses and you'd be right. But then flats have increased, semis and detached are smaller. 

 

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On 08/06/2020 at 16:44, 2buyornot2buy said:

Quality isn't just measured by how well a tradesman fits a skirting board. Though building defects are a measure of poor quality. Size is a quality attribute. Lots of things make up "quality" when comparing similar objects, e.g. houses. If I'm comparing a 1890 detached and one recently built room size, garden etc are all valid measures of quality. I don't have access to NHBC claim data but it's a significant enough problem for them to introduce gagging clauses on settlements

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/business/2017/feb/16/new-home-owners-gagged-over-poor-build-and-compensation-claims

Average house size by house type have been decreasing in the UK for years. 

Obviously you can say but look we demolished all those terraces and build townhouses and you'd be right. But then flats have increased, semis and detached are smaller. 

 

I think we are agreeing that quality = workmanship and choice of materials etc and size = well, size.

They are two seperate issues. 

I don't agree quality of houses in the 1980/90's are better than now. Quite the opposite. 

I would like to look further for data to see if the housing in the UK has decreased. Probably two main drivers for this-

1.We have more apartment living now and apartments are normally smaller that housing.

2. We have smaller families units now. The experts tell us there will be over 30% 1 person households soon. That percentage used to be only 20%

 

 

Edited by BelfastVI

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Floor Space in English Homes Report

The above is a Report by the Ministery of Housing & Communties, July 2018.

I havnt dived in but the background section covers the size of differant types of housing in the UK covering pre 1919 to our current post 2002 stock.

Quote

 

"This research demonstrates the difficulties in assessing the relative size of English homes over time. The position is a complex one not least because the types of homes built in different periods varies so much. Nonetheless this research concludes that there is no overriding evidence to suggest that our newest homes are getting smaller.

For the whole of the English housing stock, and for most dwelling types, average internal floor area has remained fairly constant over time, particularly if homes built before 1919 are excluded.

There is, however, evidence to suggest that during the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s average floor space fell for some types of houses when compared with older homes and the newest homes built after 2002. For example, average floor space among purpose built flats remained constant in those built from 1919 to 1974, but then fell from 1975 to 2002. The newest purpose built flats built after 2002 had an average floor space greater than those built from 1975 to 2002.

From the 1990s, diversity in dwelling sizes increased, returning to pre-1945 levels. After 2002, however, 43% of new homes built since were purpose built flats and the predominant bedroom size of new homes was two bedrooms. Not surprisingly, these types of homes tend to be smaller than the typical family sized semi-detached homes most commonly built from 1945 to the mid1970s. Homes of the same type however tend not to show significant differences in size.

There is some evidence to suggest that for medium and larger sized family homes, there were generally more habitable rooms within properties of similar total floor area from around 1980. The inclusion of rooms such as en suite rooms and utility rooms, some of which may have been added after a home was originally constructed, may be making our modern homes feel smaller."

 

1207653008_FloorAreapre1919topost2002.JPG.074a1ab5d04d6ef2d7e91991562fae25.JPG

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1 hour ago, BelfastVI said:

I think we are agreeing that quality = workmanship and choice of materials etc and size = well, size.

They are two seperate issues. 

I don't agree quality of houses in the 1980/90's are better than now. Quite the opposite. 

I would like to look further for data to see if the housing in the UK has decreased. Probably two main drivers for this-

1.We have more apartment living now and apartments are normally smaller that housing.

2. We have smaller families units now. The experts tell us there will be over 30% 1 person households soon. That percentage used to be only 20%

 

 

No. We don't agree. Workmanship is a quality indicator yes. Size is also a quality indicator. Outdoor space is an indicator. Quality attributes change based on the customer. Obviously your indicators will be workmanship indicators because those are what you are measured on. You have to fix the defects but those are obviously not the only measures. Even proximity to shops, schools etc are indicators. 

For example

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/housing-quality-indicators

Housing quality indicators

Housing quality indicators measure the quality of housing schemes funded by the Homes and Communities Agency.

There are 10 indicators that measure quality. Each indicator contains a series of questions that are completed by the applicant organisation. These indicators are:

  1. location
  2. site – visual impact, layout and landscaping
  3. site – open space
  4. site – routes and movement
  5. unit – size
  6. unit – layout
  7. unit – noise, light, services and adaptability
  8. unit – accessibility within the unit
  9. unit – sustainability
  10. external environment – Building for Life

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https://www.labcwarranty.co.uk/blog/are-britain-s-houses-getting-smaller-new-data/

What is the average house size in the UK? (New Data)


Houses are a controversial subject in the UK. Some say we are not building enough, some say we are not building houses of the right quality and some say the houses we are building are just too small. 

Now, while the first two complaints are generally quite subjective topics, where the argument largely rests on your opinion, you simply can’t argue with size. 

Either the British houses we are building are smaller than the previous decade, or they are not. Simple, data-led fact. 

With this in mind, the data experts here at LABC Warranty wanted to settle the argument once and for all - are Britain’s houses really getting smaller? 

Turning to property sites such as Rightmove and Zoopla, we have analysed data on 10,000 houses built in each decade going all the way back to the 1930s. 

Find our results below - and yes, Britain’s houses really are getting smaller!

 

 
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FUTURE OF CONSTRUCTION

Posted on 21/09/2019

What is the average house size in the UK? (New Data)


Houses are a controversial subject in the UK. Some say we are not building enough, some say we are not building houses of the right quality and some say the houses we are building are just too small. 

Now, while the first two complaints are generally quite subjective topics, where the argument largely rests on your opinion, you simply can’t argue with size. 

Either the British houses we are building are smaller than the previous decade, or they are not. Simple, data-led fact. 

With this in mind, the data experts here at LABC Warranty wanted to settle the argument once and for all - are Britain’s houses really getting smaller? 

Turning to property sites such as Rightmove and Zoopla, we have analysed data on 10,000 houses built in each decade going all the way back to the 1930s. 

Find our results below - and yes, Britain’s houses really are getting smaller!

Find a full methodology at the bottom of this article.

Average UK house size in the 1930s 

Going back to the 1930s, this is where our analysis starts. 

You may be wondering:
 
“Why start in the 1930s?”

Well, unfortunately there just isn’t enough data for houses built in the decades before 1930. Whether they have been knocked down to make way for new housing developments or turned into student accommodation, there simply weren’t 10,000 houses available for us to analyse.

So what did our analysis of 1930s houses show? 

Britain’s 1930s houses really were quite small. Our analysis showed that the average living room would measure about 16.01m2 and the main bedroom was on average 15.34m2. 1930s kitchens were the smallest of any decade, with the average measuring just 12.27m2.

image showing the average size of different rooms in a home - 1930sKey Stats - 1930s Housing

The average living room was 16.01m2
The average master bedroom was 15.34m2
The average kitchen was 12.27m2
The average home had 3.21 bedrooms

Average UK house size in the 1940s

The Second World War had a profound impact on the British building industry. 

Much of the industry came to a standstill in the first half of the decade, while the second half was plagued by a short supply of workers and building materials. 

So what did our analysis of 1940s houses show?

Of the housing that was built after the war, things did start to improve. Living rooms grew by 1.12m2and kitchen size grew by nearly 2.00m2. That’s quite an improvement across the decade. 

However, our analysis did show that master bedroom size decreased by over 1.5m2. This could be the direct result of 40s houses offering more bedrooms than the previous decade.

image showing the average size of different rooms in a house - 1940sKey Stats - 1940s Housing

The average living room was 17.22m2
The average master bedroom was 13.74m2
The average kitchen was 13.70m2
The average home had 3.63 bedrooms

Average UK house size in the 1950s

Following the Second World War, the desire to rebuild the nation was paramount. 

People demanded new homes and the need to rebuild such a great number of homes led to a housing revolution. 

So what did our analysis of 1950s houses show? 

In terms of the size, houses built in the 1950s offered plenty. 

Our analysis showed that living rooms grew even further to 22.03m2. Kitchen size grew by another 0.30m2, and the master bedroom added nearly 1m2to its overall size.

Tweet: In terms of size, houses built in the 1950s offered plenty [New Study] https://ctt.ec/mrE0O+ [Source: LABC Warranty]

image showing the average size of different rooms of a house - 1950sKey Stats - 1950s Housing

The average living room was 22.03m2
The average master bedroom was 14.49m2
The average kitchen was 14.05m2
The average home had 3.16 bedrooms

Average UK house size in the 1960s

The 1960s house building industry was split into two eras. 

The first was between 1960 and 1965. For five years the industry embraced the construction of tower block housing, with over 55,000 built in 5 years. 

The second half of the 60s saw complaints of shoddy design overwhelm the building industry.  This led to tower blocks being dropped in exchange for functional, box-like homes that are highly popular today. 

So what did our analysis of 1960s houses show?

As the quality of Britain’s homes improved in the later part of the decade, so did the size. 

Living rooms remained over 20m2 and master bedrooms had a 15.05m2 average. The largest so far. 

Interestingly, our analysis showed that on average 1960s houses were 1.35m2
bigger than the previous decade. 

image showing the average size of different rooms in a house - 1960sKey Stats - 1960s Housing

The average living room was 21.05m2
The average master bedroom was 15.05m2
The average kitchen was 15.37m2
The average home had 3.21 bedrooms

Average UK house size in the 1970s

With inflation as high as 36% defining the first half of the 70s, the second half of the decade would be defined by modern architecture. 

Homes started to move away from traditional box-like design and almost took on a whimsical appeal. 

So what did our analysis of 1970s houses show? 

As houses started to take on whimsical interior design, the exterior size of the average house continued to grow. 

Living rooms reached 24.89m2, the typical kitchen measured 14.96m2 and the average number of bedrooms grew to 3.53. 

Overall, Britain built the biggest houses in the 1970s. 

Tweet: Overall, Britain built the biggest houses in the 1970s [New Study] https://ctt.ec/P0IJu+ [Source: LABC Warranty]

image showing the average size of different rooms of a home - 1970sKey Stats - 1970s Housing

The average living room was 24.89m2
The average master bedroom was 14.71m2
The average kitchen was 14.96m2
The average home had 3.53 bedrooms

Average UK house size in the 1980s

As disposable income nearly doubled in the 80s, the demand for improved regulations and guidelines for new housing developments soared. 

This led to a decline in the number of houses being built, but the quality surged.

So what did our analysis of 1980s houses show? 

Britain’s houses started to regress. 

Living room size dropped by an average of 2.8m2, master bedroom size dropped from 14.71m2 to 13.83m2 and even typical kitchen sizes regressed by 0.82m2. 

Does this downhill trend continue? 

image showing the average size of different rooms in a home - 1980sKey Stats - 1980s Housing

The average living room was 22.06m2
The average master bedroom was 13.83m2
The average kitchen was 14.02m2
The average home had 3.58 bedrooms

Average UK house size in the 1990s

The last decade of the 20th century will be remembered as the era that celeb culture emerged, reality TV was born and glossy magazines aplenty could be found in most UK homes. 

So what did our analysis of 1990s houses show? 

Similar to the previous decade, Britain’s houses would continue to get smaller. 

Living rooms would regress by 0.7m2 and kitchens would lose another 0.25m2 also. 

Surprisingly, master bedrooms did make a slight improvement of 0.12m2 compared to the previous decade. 


image showing the average size of different rooms in a home - 1990sKey Stats - 1990s Housing

The average living room was 21.33m2
The average master bedroom was 13.95m2
The average kitchen was 13.79m2
The average home had 3.42 bedrooms

Average UK house size in the 2000s

With the turn of the millennium, British society was blown away by the advances in technology and science. 

The iPod would change how we listened to music forever. 

Social networking would take over our lives. 

Recycling bins would become a ‘thing’. 

So what did our analysis of 2000s houses show?

Compared to the previous two decades, Britain’s houses would continue to get smaller.

Our analysis showed that the average living room size dropped to below 20m2 for the first time in 50 years, while the master bedroom and kitchen would regress too. 

image showing the average size of different rooms in a home - 2000sKey Stats - 2000 Housing

The average living room was 19.75m2
The average master bedroom was 13.64m2
The average kitchen was 13.44m2
The average home had 3.32 bedrooms

So what is the UK's average house size overall?

Today, Britain’s houses have never been smaller. 

Our analysis of the first seven years of the decade is continued regression. 

The average living room is now 17.09m2. That’s a 1.64m2 drop in a decade. Bedroom size and the number of bedrooms on offer has decreased also. 

Master bedrooms diminish by an average of 0.30m2and the number of bedrooms dropped to below three for the first time ever. 

The overall statistics don’t make for pretty reading either. Compared to the previous decade, homes built from 2010 onwards are over 4m2 smaller. 

67.8
20.0
40.0
60.0
80.0
68.3
1930
68.1
1940
77.0
1950
77.5
1960
83.3
1970
74.7
1980
73.4
1990
72.4
2000
67.8
Current

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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