Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

UK Construction.com


 Share

Recommended Posts

do boats go up much in value? excluding your initial ''BMV'' gain (im sure you said you'd had it valued for more than you paid). dont get me wrong, we all like a bit of fun, but persoanlly i wouldnt substitute my house, for something as depreciative as a boat. what will it be worth in 15 years time? or do you plan to rebuy back into the HM? just curious on your plan.hope you dont mind me asking.

regards BBB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

do boats go up much in value?  ....persoanlly i wouldnt substitute my house, for something as depreciative as a boat.

I'm with you there BBB. Personally I would recommed people lease a boat (http://www.boats.com/content/default_detai...?contentid=2899).

The same is true of cars. Reg Vardy are bringing US style leases to the UK - check this out http://www.regvardy.com/us_leasing.htm

Depreciation on these sorts of assets can be horendous. This is only apparent to those purchasing on finance when after three years they find their debt far exceeds the residual value of "their" car.

Also be very wary of buying a houseboat or narrow boat. Whilst you may be immune to flood, without freehold tenure of your moorings, your boat is practically worthless.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes our boat has gone up very much in value from the time we brought it, our boat was £40,500 and had our boat recently valued at £56,000.

Our boat's is www.tafelberg.co.uk - boats are very affordable compared to houses. And we are free from any mortgage payments. We have escaped that trap that holds us down so much, the amount of debt that the UK is going to be in.

We don't want to be held down with that dreaded mortgage.

We have given up our house and mortgage in March at the beginning of this year. phew! We have escaped the house market crash.

We are laughing now the house market crash at last is kicking in. After all the people laughed at us because all they cared about was equity, now they are due to pay negative equity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And with our boat, can you go shopping with your house, we can, we go away for weekends, we are having the time of our lives because we are not tied down to a mortgage.

Can you take your home/house on holiday, we can.

For us as a family its been the best thing. Our girls, who are 5 and 18 months. They love it too, and my oldest goes to a good school which has done her good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes our boat has gone up very much in value from the time we brought it, our boat was £40,500 and had our boat recently valued at £56,000. 

I'm a little worried for you.

I refer to posts on this site that discus the nature of market cycles. Th egist of these I will repeat:

Rising markets push up prices in this order:

1 ) Most desirable locations with best rental yields

2 ) Next best locations with diminished renatl yields

3 ) Slums with no rental yields but still affordable

People buy 2 cos they can't afford 1 and then buy 3 cos they can't afford 2

Your boat looks very pretty and I don't doubt living on it will be fun (at least for the summer). It clearly is no slum, but it is affordable still. In this sense I would say as an asset you can live in it is much closer to 3 than 1: my point is I would expect it to be going up in price at the tail of a property boom.

Falling markets push prices down in the same order, but the degree of eventual collapse increases from 1 -> 2 -> 3, so you may feel like a winner at the moment, but I wonder how things will pan out. Also boats generally depreciate which makes me feel th eprice rise you have seen fits into the general pattern of market cycles.

The other worrying thing I note is that posters who have written about this were talking about property. I have witnessed the exact same scenario in stocks and shares.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our boat is 70ft long and where we are. we pay by length on our mooring.  But compared to a mortgage.  Its much better. 

my husband was so stressed out because of the mortgage, it was a nightmare, now as a couple and as a family it has done us good.

So you don't own the freehold. I would urge you to acquire a freehold asap even if it means taking on a mortgage. Without moorings of your own you are effectively a water gypsy.

"If It Appreciates, Buy It. If It Depreciates, Lease It"

Paul Getty, Oil Baron (1892 - 1976)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

do boats go up much in value? excluding your initial ''BMV'' gain (im sure you said you'd had it valued for more than you paid). dont get me wrong, we all like a bit of fun, but persoanlly i wouldnt substitute my house, for something as depreciative as a boat. what will it be worth in 15 years time? or do you plan to rebuy back into the HM? just curious on your plan.hope you dont mind me asking.

regards BBB

Our boat was valued at £56500 2 weeks ago, 5 months after we bought it for £40500.

They do go up in value if they are well looked after.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our boat is 70ft long and where we are. we pay by length on our mooring.  But compared to a mortgage.   Its much better. 

my husband was so stressed out because of the mortgage, it was a nightmare, now as a couple and as a family it has done us good.

So you don't own the freehold. I would urge you to acquire a freehold asap even if it means taking on a mortgage. Without moorings of your own you are effectively a water gypsy.

"If It Appreciates, Buy It. If It Depreciates, Lease It"

Paul Getty, Oil Baron (1892 - 1976)

I've had second thougts about this as moorings may fall into the #3 above. In short, if you believe property prices are going to fall you shouldn't be owning anything to do with property, be it a boat/moorings or otherwise. In markets when the tide goes out everything goes down with it.

If you believe market sare going to fall, rental is your only logical option: that includes your boat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our boat is ours, no one can take this away from us. To say that we are water gypsies is offensive. My husband works - he is self employed by doing websites for various companies and goes to work in Enfield aswell for more money.

I stay at home with my girls, I do not have to work, whereas in the house and tied with a mortgage, so those mums who have kids go to work to help pay the mortgage.

I do not have to do that, my girls need me at home. If we were in the house, which we were, I would have to go out to work as well.

With our boat, we have done what is right for us as a family and a couple. My girls love it especially my older one. She does not want to go back to a house.

My husband also does not want to pay for a mortgage at all.

That Kirsty has no idea whatsoever, the house market is going to crash, and who wants to pay negative equity - not us.

Loads of the people who lives on boats, have normal lives, and work and do every day things like you and I.

Its best to own your own house/boat/whatever, because it is yours, no one elses. when the house market crashes than you can buy your own house, but for us, I don't think we can ever go back to a house in a long time. Because we are enjoying ourselves alot more than we did with a house and a mortgage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think sledgehead was implying that you are a water gypsy, but without the moring you would not have permanent place to put it and hence be floating free (whihc in itself isn't bad, unless you need some a permanent base).

I also own and live on a canal boat (mooring rented from Birtish Waterways) they can, as any landlord can, chuck you out but as long as you pay your bills and don't cause trouble I have them to be good.

Also winter is some of the best times, just get the fire going and the wine open.

Boat prices are linked to house prices but are much less volatile, they also appeal to a different sort of person, so if prices do take a tumble they are likely to fall but not in the same proportions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think sledgehead was implying that you are a water gypsy, but without the moring you would not have permanent place to put it and hence be floating free (whihc in itself isn't bad, unless you need some a permanent base).

I also own and live on a canal boat (mooring rented from Birtish Waterways) they can, as any landlord can, chuck you out but as long as you pay your bills and don't cause trouble I have them to be good.

Also winter is some of the best times, just get the fire going and the wine open.

Boat prices are linked to house prices but are much less volatile, they also appeal to a different sort of person, so if prices do take a tumble they are likely to fall but not in the same proportions.

Excellent!

yes we have a permanant mooring like yours.

:-)

It will be interesting to see if boat prices are affected by house prices.

Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well they are technically not permanent but long term, which means you can "stay aboad" for a maximum of 11 months of the year, but after holidays and weekends away etc. that is ok. Permanent ones usually have electric and water (mmmm running water...).

Yep will be interesting to see what happens to boat prices, I am personally saving until house prices come down a bit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right, I don't know quite where to start in defence of my post. Here we go:

My husband works - he is self employed by doing websites for various companies and goes to work in Enfield aswell for more money. 

I stay at home with my girls, I do not have to work, whereas in the house and tied with a mortgage, so those mums who have kids go to work to help pay the mortgage. 

I do not have to do that, my girls need me at home.  If we were in the house, which we were, I would have to go out to work as well. 

With our boat,  we have done what is right for us as a family and a couple.  My girls love it especially my older one.  She does not want to go back to a house. 

My husband also does not want to pay for a mortgage at all. 

What can I say, you sound a really well adjusted person with a well adjusted husband. With all th etime you can devote to your children they will doubtless turn out as well adjusted as you are. You sound like my sort of people: responsible, independent and independently minded.

That Kirsty has no idea whatsoever, the house market is going to crash, and who wants to pay negative equity - not us.

Th everdict is still out, but you are as entitled to your view as anyone. I can see no logical fault in your reasoning.

Loads of the people who lives on boats, have normal lives, and work and do every day things like you and I.

... I know you are probbably just reacting to my offensive comment. There's no need to be so defensive.

Its best to own your own house/boat/whatever, because it is yours, no one elses.

I think you are getting hung up on ownership, but with th ecountry in the grip of a land grab who can blame you. You've taken a decision to live alternatively: rejoice in it.

when the house market crashes than you can buy your own house, but for us, I don't think we can ever go back to a house in a long time.  Because we are enjoying ourselves alot more than we did with a house and a mortgage.

...there you go!

Our boat is ours, no one can take this away from us.  To say that we are water gypsies is offensive.

Yep it is, but maybe I'm just being the devils advocate. People in certain US states are very narrow minded about sex. In the UK we are only narrow minded about one thing: having a place where you can park your bum from which nobody can tell you to move. Call it property, call it land, call it moorings.

I really feel like pouring out a whole load of stuff here just to let you know I'm on your side. For instance, the build quality of American modular homes is far superior to British fixed homes: all the parts have to be machined properly so they can fit together. Foundation tied homes here are thrown up and all the crap workmanship covered up with gunk we call plaster: can you imagine Mecedes building their cars that way? Your narrow boat was built by craftsmen. Modern homes are thrown up by gangs of unskilled labourers. None-the-less, most people in the UK aspire to house ownership.

In Japan, a country with a comparable geographical structure, population density and standard of living to our own, houses depreciate because they are seen as temporary.

In Holland houseboats are common and floating homes are viewed in many ways as superior to homes with foundations.

But whilst it may be illogical and ununiversal to attach importance to ownership of foundation tied property, it is none-the-less something the majority of UK people do.

I suppose if you wanted to really take the piss out of me you could say I sound like a concerned parent of the 50s who's daughter wanted to marry a Black man (ooh, shock horror): "it's not what I think dear, I'm just worried for the children...." Backward, biggotted and soon to become a dinosaur.

I expect the Netherlands to start changing people's views on water dwelling within the next ten years, so if you can put up with the odd gypsy jibe 'til then you'll probably be left feeling smug.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My husband just read the postings and wanted to answer....over to him

Sledgehead, thanks for your reply :-) We actually really appreciated the discussion and your response. I hope we are well-adjusted. Certainly we're very content with this lifestyle.

I am always happy to talk with those who would be thinking about a move like this as someone who has done it.

It's not for everyone - just like living in a house is not for everyone I think certain people would really love it and for others it would be a disaster. I don't think people should do what we have done simply because of Financial reasons, thats not enough.

It's also NOT a good idea if your partner is not keen on it, you have to be committed to it from day one.

It's a very different lifestyle and it needs to be checked out. But there are many benefits.

I'm hoping that our discussion has prompted more thoughts about "alternative" lifestyles. A good website if you would like further information is http://www.rboa.co.uk

I'm actually writing this whilst sitting on my boat, using wireless Broadband.

Best wishes

Paul.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm hoping that our discussion has prompted more thoughts about "alternative" lifestyles. A good website if you would like further information is http://www.rboa.co.uk

What do you think of this:

http://www.alexanderhenny.com/

Click Ontwerpen when you get there.

My guess is one of two reaction: a ) wet yourself, b ) say "yeah, but it's not a proper boat is it?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds to me that 'the tafelburgs' have made a lifestyle choice as much as anything else and I for one think this should be applauded.

I suppose it's a sign of the times that we end up discussing the financial implications of selling a house and buying a boat.

Can anyone tell me how you measure the economic cost of selling against what was clearly an emotional sttress of servicing a mortgage for 'Mr tafelburg'???

Good for you tafelburgs - sounds like you are happy with your choice and subsequent lifestyle, which should be everyones primary consideration.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.





×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.