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Guest rigsby II

Seasonal Affective Disorder

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I don't have it, but working nights means theres a couple of days a week where I wont see daylight and it does have an effect.

Have you tried

http://www.sada.org.uk/ ?

Hi,

Sorry to hear about your SAD. I think a lot more people are affected by this than they realise.

I know I don't like the long dark winter's nights, we all thrive better in daylight. Perhaps you could go somewhere sunny just after xmas, then you have something else to look forward to and you'll get a blast of sun-rays. I've found that doing a lot of things that I like helps me get through it, making sure you get out during the day when there is some sunlight, work permitting of course :(

Some people swear by those daylight lamps that you can buy....

All the best

Frank

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Guest growl

Anyone else suffering ?

When the clocks go back I'll be climbing the walls.

Roll on Spring.

:(

Take St.Johns wort. You can get it in capsul form at your local chemist or health food shop. Or really cheap on the Internet. However it can react with too much sun light. So don't bother in the summer if you find yourself getting giddy.

It works for me. :D

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Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Sep 13; [Epub ahead of print]

Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder with Blue Narrow-Band Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs).

Glickman G, Byrne B, Pineda C, Hauck WW, Brainard GC.

BACKGROUND: While light has proven an effective treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), an optimal wavelength combination has not been determined. Short wavelength light (blue) has demonstrated potency as a stimulus for acute melatonin suppression and circadian phase shifting. METHODS: This study tested the efficacy of short wavelength light therapy for SAD. Blue light emitting diode (LED) units produced 468 nm light at 607 muW/cm(2) (27 nm half-peak bandwidth); dim red LED units provided 654 nm at 34 muW/cm(2) (21 nm half-peak bandwidth). Patients with major depression with a seasonal pattern, a score of >/=20 on the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-SAD version (SIGH-SAD) and normal sleeping patterns (routine bedtimes between 10:00 pm and midnight) received 45 minutes of morning light treatment daily for 3 weeks. Twenty-four patients completed treatment following random assignment of condition (blue vs. red light). The SIGH-SAD was administered weekly. RESULTS: Mixed-effects analyses of covariance determined that the short wavelength light treatment decreased SIGH-SAD scores significantly more than the dimmer red light condition (F = 6.45, p = .019 for average over the post-treatment times). CONCLUSIONS: Narrow bandwidth blue light at 607 muW/cm(2) outperforms dimmer red light in reversing symptoms of major depression with a seasonal pattern.

There you go, you need to look at blue light. Biological Psychiatry, good journal

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There you go, you need to look at blue light. Biological Psychiatry, good journal

Does this mean more viewing of housepricecrash site? (my background colour happens to be blue).

btp

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Does this mean more viewing of housepricecrash site? (my background colour happens to be blue).

btp

Why not? Perhaps the Medical Research Council will give me 200K for a RCT...

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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