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......housing yourself costs money whatever way you look at it, some pay more doing it others less, some can afford to pay more mostly the ones who can afford to buy ....... so the punters that buy to let out are taking on a high risk investment when fewer can afford or are prepared to pay the rents they ask for/need so more unpaid rents and voids, add to that their investment capital is also losing money and costs are increasing not to mention the hassle factor........when property prices are falling property investors find other safer productive homes for their money. ;)

Not much to add to that :).

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Eldest starts school in September, don't know which school yet but have applied. Don't anticipate having to move further than a mile or 2 even if given notice. Not sure where the inconvenience arises?

Could be subject to 2 months notice at any time which is not ideal with a newborn but won't kill anyone.

Depends exactly where you live I guess. A quick search on RM shows only 9 houses available to rent within 3 miles of me (4 bed, up to 1500pcm) and only two of those are with the catchment area - so that situation would be a worry. I guess if you live somewhere like Altrincham, Cheadle, Bramhall there's more availability so it may not be as big a risk for you.

Packing/Moving/Unpacking are a pain in the **** with babies/toddlers but certainly doable,especially if you have parents who can get rid of them for a few days.

Had a colleage hit by real inconveniencea couple of years back. He was renting in Knutsford - his eldest at one primary, had to move as served notice and the new place was outside the school's area - so despite sibling at school A, they could only get second in at school B.

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......housing yourself costs money whatever way you look at it, some pay more doing it others less, some can afford to pay more mostly the ones who can afford to buy ....... so the punters that buy to let out are taking on a high risk investment when fewer can afford or are prepared to pay the rents they ask for/need so more unpaid rents and voids, add to that their investment capital is also losing money and costs are increasing not to mention the hassle factor........when property prices are falling property investors find other safer productive homes for their money. ;)

I though we were talking about a house to live in, not to buy as an investment? If you were looking to buy as an investment then now wouldn't be a good time, generally speaking.

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What about those that bought for cash....they could well have lost that or more than that in interest and or income from other low risk investments...not only that their house has also lost 10% of its value over the last 12 months. ;)

But it won't have lost 10% of its volume. And if you're not planning to sell for several years, it won't matter. Like it or not, prices will go up again eventually, though personally I wouldn't expect it for another 8-10 years. Though having said that, I've just seen some daft, delusional pricing again in SW17.

So much depends on your attitude. Some people will never be happy paying a LL's mortgage and knowing they can be kicked out whenever. Others can shrug and look at what they may be saving elsewhere. And that can vary enormously according to where you live and what sort of property you're renting.

What suits one person's circumstances/finances is not necessarily going to suit the next person's.

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But it won't have lost 10% of its volume. And if you're not planning to sell for several years, it won't matter. Like it or not, prices will go up again eventually, though personally I wouldn't expect it for another 8-10 years. Though having said that, I've just seen some daft, delusional pricing again in SW17.

So much depends on your attitude. Some people will never be happy paying a LL's mortgage and knowing they can be kicked out whenever. Others can shrug and look at what they may be saving elsewhere. And that can vary enormously according to where you live and what sort of property you're renting.

What suits one person's circumstances/finances is not necessarily going to suit the next person's.

Aaarrrggghhhh! We forgot those two :lol:.

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Is that 200K of "dead money" you are benefitting from?

Yes.

totally dead money, then to compound matters I'll be forced to move to a mile or two near my next job tragically saving me even more money in these days of high fuel costs.

Oh, the shame of it.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere
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My landlords just paid for someone to come round bleed all my rads and he could be looking at a 2K bill for a new boiler .

I'll add that onto the 200K I estimate I am better off by through renting.

I may have to change jobs soon, so I'll be able to give 1 months notice and move on for a better opportunity.

I love renting. :lol:

My landlords builder came round to fix a leaking sink a few months back. I ended up getting a brand new bathroom: sink, bath, shower and toilet. And he re-tiled every wall, floor to ceiling. Also he also renewed the flooring. And he did a beautiful job, too.

I love the guy - always makes a little job a big'un. :)

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My landlords builder came round to fix a leaking sink a few months back. I ended up getting a brand new bathroom: sink, bath, shower and toilet. And he re-tiled every wall, floor to ceiling. Also he also renewed the flooring. And he did a beautiful job, too.

I love the guy - always makes a little job a big'un. :)

Sounds like a good landlord.

I like my LL, he sorts stuff out when I ask him to. Rent's not going up. Happy to have me there as long as I like to stay.

if the LL was a ****, I'd move.

I'd like to mention neighbours, I have fine neighbours right now, can't fault them. Time before last when I owned a place I had a right d*** for a neighbour, I was glad to move to get away from him. Wish i'd been renting then. I'm sure there are many people stuck with nasty neighbours that wished they'd rented. It's worth every penny in rent not to be stuck somewhere, if that's dead money then I'll happily kill some more :lol:

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere
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My landlords builder came round to fix a leaking sink a few months back. I ended up getting a brand new bathroom: sink, bath, shower and toilet. And he re-tiled every wall, floor to ceiling. Also he also renewed the flooring. And he did a beautiful job, too.

I love the guy - always makes a little job a big'un. :)

Are you sure he's not just updating the property in order to get it in a good state to sell?

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Depends what you want, if you are happy with the debt you have undertaken, and have a workable repayment plan (the same thing as rent) are happy to live in a property that ticks most boxes for a long period of time (moving ie selling and buying is very expensive) are happy with the area and close neighbours.......but most importantly you are buying it for the right reasons ie as a comfortable home to live in not an investment....would you still be happy if you one day sold it for less than you paid for it, that is the clincher, if you can say yes to that.....do it, why not. ;)

See my post above.

But it won't have lost 10% of its volume. And if you're not planning to sell for several years, it won't matter. Like it or not, prices will go up again eventually, though personally I wouldn't expect it for another 8-10 years. Though having said that, I've just seen some daft, delusional pricing again in SW17.

So much depends on your attitude. Some people will never be happy paying a LL's mortgage and knowing they can be kicked out whenever. Others can shrug and look at what they may be saving elsewhere. And that can vary enormously according to where you live and what sort of property you're renting.

What suits one person's circumstances/finances is not necessarily going to suit the next person's.

Sure if you are not planning to sell for several years and you can afford to buy at today's prices, a FTB I know who recently purchased a small two small bed terraced property could only do so because they were helped out with a £100k deposit gift from the parents, not many have that luxury .....but in a falling market what have you got to lose by waiting and saving...most people are at work all day anyway so not exactly making use of the home, because they are either too busy saving for the deposit or working to pay for it. ;)

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Are you sure he's not just updating the property in order to get it in a good state to sell?

No.. it's a commercial enterprise, he's spending that money solely for the tenants pleasure.

Edited by exiges
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Some people will never be happy paying a LL's mortgage and knowing they can be kicked out whenever.

You can say "kicked out" as long as you qualify that as a court ordering a tenancy ends and eviction to happen. This all takes far longer than the term "kicked out" implies.

You should also bear in mind that if you end up in a rented flat such as the one I am in - with anti-social behaviour problems nearby, smell of cigarette smoke through the walls, completely impossible to heat efficiently, condensation/black mould, poor parking availability, noisy lifts, dodgy people renting adjacent flats etc etc - you are free to wave a cheery byebye on a month's notice and put it all down to experience rather than the aggravation of trying to rectify all of the above which, by the way, you'd have had a hard job discovering before you signed purchasing deeds. Often it's only by LIVING in a place you get to see what it's REALLY like. In this case, I wouldn't - had I known - neither rented nor bought this flat even at half the price

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typos

Edited by inflating
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Are you sure he's not just updating the property in order to get it in a good state to sell?

more like he doesnt want the council round doing it for him at Public sector rates.

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Depends exactly where you live I guess. A quick search on RM shows only 9 houses available to rent within 3 miles of me (4 bed, up to 1500pcm) and only two of those are with the catchment area - so that situation would be a worry. I guess if you live somewhere like Altrincham, Cheadle, Bramhall there's more availability so it may not be as big a risk for you.

Packing/Moving/Unpacking are a pain in the **** with babies/toddlers but certainly doable,especially if you have parents who can get rid of them for a few days.

Had a colleage hit by real inconveniencea couple of years back. He was renting in Knutsford - his eldest at one primary, had to move as served notice and the new place was outside the school's area - so despite sibling at school A, they could only get second in at school B.

No shortage of supply here if you're not too fussy. Its not like I could afford to be fussy if I was buying either so its not an unfair comparison.

2 schools is a long way off but my wife never returned to work full-time and renting has allowed us to explore our options so that we don't become 2 wroker bees again. I imagine in time she will be self-employed/home-based worker so these potential problems are not showstoppers. We do not have close family to hand so we have to support ourselves most of the time. It is important to remain flexible so that we can do this. Buying would suit no one but our bank.

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Are you sure he's not just updating the property in order to get it in a good state to sell?

Funny you should say that, as I asked the builder about it. The prompt reply was "No way! XXX will never sell. He's too attached to his properties." That suits me fine. :)

Ps. Remember, my landlord doesn't need the money - he got the place for free. And his mum's house too when she passed away. And he bought his own house over 25 years ago. Lucky b'stard...

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Funny you should say that, as I asked the builder about it. The prompt reply was "No way! XXX will never sell. He's too attached to his properties." That suits me fine. :)

Ps. Remember, my landlord doesn't need the money - he got the place for free. And his mum's house too when she passed away. And he bought his own house over 25 years ago. Lucky b'stard...

Fair enough, I was just playing devil's advocate :)

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No.. it's a commercial enterprise, he's spending that money solely for the tenants pleasure.

Imaginary savings are great though.

I must be quids in already from the maintenance work I haven't done be will, from the builders that will quote me but haven't yet.

Obviously though I can't compete with the army of renters out there who can plug and play boilers and radiators from one accommodation to the next.

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Imaginary savings are great though.

I must be quids in already from the maintenance work I haven't done be will, from the builders that will quote me but haven't yet.

Obviously though I can't compete with the army of renters out there who can plug and play boilers and radiators from one accommodation to the next.

Do you still live at home with your folks?

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The only thing established thus far is renting is fine should you lead a long term no commitments life, finances allowing.

It's hardly a view that has it's finger on the pulse on most FTB's I know.

Don't get me wrong I don't begrudge that position, well done but personally speaking I don't wish to wait past my thirty's to buy as they're will be things by then I will delay by not 'living' in my own space.

The debt slave for life thing is soon going to look very outdated, and will possibly soon be violently opposed in Europe? The old VI game is slowly unravelling, buying (or kidding yourself on that you 'own" with a large debt pile) before things become clearer is IMO madness. ALL the pressure is now on those hoping to sell, or those dreaming their house is worth a certain amount, let them sweat, and let them slowly realise the game is up.Debt free renters are in no hurry to buy piles of bricks.

Edited by dances with sheeple
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Not until a few years ago.

What's with the bad vibes? Your previous house sharers keep drinking your milk?

I think there will be many frustrated buyers when they find out that owning your own home is not quite the free ride they are expecting. There are swings and there are roundabouts as much as there are with renting.

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In what way?

For me, it's the freedom of movement. In my sector (and I am lucky to be in it - it could have been any other sector) there are still lots of vacancies and renting gives me the security of knowing that if the company I'm with at the moment goes down, I can easily move to another job, and also the option to keep my eyes open and move on to any better job I see. I've quit my last two jobs without finding another first, safe in the knowledge that I can move anywhere for the next one, and telling a prospective employer anywhere in the country that you could start next week makes a hell of a difference.

If I was tied to a mortgage, that would all be much harder (and I've even worked with people who've had job offers elsewhere they wanted to take up but couldn't sell their houses to take it - in one case he tried to sell for six months before the prospective employer had to close the door and hire someone else).

Obviously everyone's situation is different, but you did ask.

Edited by JJJ
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  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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