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Very Sad Story, 55 And Washed Up


Redcellar
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1 minute 30 in, to skip the preamble.

There are lots of these same people out there, not classed as unemployed. No one will touch them. Why couldn't it be you at 55?

http://www.bbc.co.uk...iPM_28_01_2012/

Well it is me at 55, but somehow we just get on with it.

This time next year Rodders.

I've not applied for thousands of jobs though.

Somehow you have to make yourself useful again. Know something or can do something thats in demand. Just don't think these very general managing people type jobs still exist.

Edited by "Steed"
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Very worth a listen this.

Very eloquent man. Intelligent. Trying but not able to connect with the world. It's tragic.

And yes there will be many, many more like him.

...know lots like it.....they don't register in any statistics, others are supporting them or they live on savings. ;)

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...know lots like it.....they don't register in any statistics, others are supporting them or they live on savings. ;)

He made a wrong turning in the road.

A few years ago there were plenty of jobs one of which could have kept him in his house....but no he was too well educated and needed more education. This is the long recession...

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He made a wrong turning in the road.

A few years ago there were plenty of jobs one of which could have kept him in his house....but no he was too well educated and needed more education. This is the long recession...

I don't doubt that....this is not a blame thing, how long does it take to spend a redundancy? ;)

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1 minute 30 in, to skip the preamble.

There are lots of these same people out there, not classed as unemployed. No one will touch them. Why couldn't it be you at 55?

http://www.bbc.co.uk...iPM_28_01_2012/

This is a lot like the stories I heard in the early 90s. That time I think a lot of it was down to structural changes (e.g. banks turning from federated organizations with fairly autonomous local managers to centralised selling machines) rather than just economic contraction, but the effect was the same: a lot of highly educated middle age men on the scrap heap. The memories of this are what have driven me to save over half my income for the last 20 years and to watch with horror as people I knew took out million pound mortgages and the like. Everyone should feel for this guy and, at the same time, do everything they can to cushion the impact if and when it happens to them.

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1 minute 30 in, to skip the preamble.

There are lots of these same people out there, not classed as unemployed. No one will touch them. Why couldn't it be you at 55?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01b1pqc/iPM_28_01_2012/

Great find.

As I listened, I felt sure the citizens income would have helped him, directly through the income itself, but also indirectly through the lower overall tax burden making it easier for entrepreneurs to create opportunities.

Anyone could be him at age 55. We need ways of providing real hope, not cheap political promises.

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1 minute 30 in, to skip the preamble.

There are lots of these same people out there, not classed as unemployed. No one will touch them. Why couldn't it be you at 55?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01b1pqc/iPM_28_01_2012/

Most important phrases he uses, in my opinion, were things like:

"living life not just existing"

"fulfillment"

"money is the consequence of what you do"

These are some of the most important questions we have to ask ourselves in the context of our macro economic "McJob" future. Eudaimonia isn't something that GDP caters for.

Good find, thanks for posting.

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His reasons for not claiming benefits sounded like bull, probably more to do with his state of mind rather than a good reason. Having paid in for years he has 10000 times more entitlement to them than many.

Well they were sound, if he signed on he would have to sit around doing nothing. If he carried on writing/producing he would be labelled as a benefit fraudster and be up befor the beak. what a crazy system.

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Well it is me at 55, but somehow we just get on with it.

This time next year Rodders.

I've not applied for thousands of jobs though.

Somehow you have to make yourself useful again. Know something or can do something thats in demand. Just don't think these very general managing people type jobs still exist.

the role of management over the stupid decade up to about 2007 was to justify spending all the 'economic growth' (ie debt) being generated

in a productive economy there really isn't anything for these blighters to do

anyway, whats the problem, surely they must all have massive paid up pensions now and need to do nothing except make ends meet for 5 years before retirement?

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Well they were sound, if he signed on he would have to sit around doing nothing. If he carried on writing/producing he would be labelled as a benefit fraudster and be up befor the beak. what a crazy system.

no, if he signed on he would additionally have to declare any other work (paid or unpaid) which would affect hios benefit entitlement, there is no law sayign you cannot work whilst claiming, you just have to declare your work

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55? This could be anyone past 40. I know many of them. Very well educated, very talented, very bright. Good men, capable men. Nobody wants them, there are far too many 20 something's chasing the same jobs. Even the minimum wage jobs don't want them. Retraining does not help, they are still over 40 and thus unemployable.

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i wouold be more sympathetic but it appears his ego/self esteem/identity is all wrapped up in his "job/career" and hence the dreaded "MBA"..

Why not learn how to cook, learn a new language etc he complains his intellect is not being used but he's not using it for himself!

Why not try temping through an agency? If your face fits your usually guarenteed a job or a long term temping role in any organisation.

Why not find a partner there will be plenty of divorcee's/widowers about at his age!

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This is a lot like the stories I heard in the early 90s. That time I think a lot of it was down to structural changes (e.g. banks turning from federated organizations with fairly autonomous local managers to centralised selling machines) rather than just economic contraction, but the effect was the same: a lot of highly educated middle age men on the scrap heap. The memories of this are what have driven me to save over half my income for the last 20 years and to watch with horror as people I knew took out million pound mortgages and the like. Everyone should feel for this guy and, at the same time, do everything they can to cushion the impact if and when it happens to them.

+1

Exactly what i have done, there will unfortunately always be winners and losers in life, the damn thing isn't fair, cos no one said it was, however, by preparing for that rainy day will cushion to a degree in tougher times.

Having said that, i know many men, my peers, friends and relatives who are a redundancy away from this situation.

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There are two issues here....one is lack of forward planning combined with a lack of money....the other is a lack of purpose and self worth, lots of skills and qualifications nobody wants or values. the feeling of being no longer of use and past the sell by date.....one issue on its own is manageable, in fact it can open new doors a new beginning.....having both issues to contend with is something more challenging to deal with. ;)

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I heard most of that this morning, though I didn't catch why he no longer had a house he'd once had. It rang bells: myself of ten years ago, as my own business was failing to make money and my savings were running out.[1]

As for benefits, they refused me the dole in 2003 because I wasn't lazy enough (I paraphrase, but you get the point). The chap this morning sounded similar: he'd have to give up all the worthwhile things he does. It's possible he was being vague precisely because the truth would've been just too implausible.

Glad to hear a would be much better off on benefits story hitting the Beeb. The timing seems good as they debate caps on high benefits, we might just get the chattering classes noticing the real defects of the system.

[1] What pulled me out was the coming of broadband at the beginning of 2004. Getting online effortlessly and continuously was just enough to cross some kind of boundary from locked out to being able to generate enough paying work to keep body and soul together.

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Why waste 12k on an MBA from Nottingham? Pointless. MBA only worth it if you go to a top business school so you can use the network and the name. An MBA for anyone around the age of 50 is pretty pointless too. He is probably damaging his CV with that third tier MBA on it.

He says he has money from selling his house, so he would not be entitled to any benefits other than his national insurance being paid.

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