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Has anyone any experiences of buying a concrete house ?

We have found an ideal house with very large front and rear gardens, with nice (brick) extensions in a nice area. It pretty much our dream, (I'd have a seperate brick built workshop, cue Vick Reeves rubbing his legs.....)

But oviously the core of it is concrete, built in the 60's. Street view is showing no major problems and we're off to look at it in the next few days.

We do not need to organise finance, so no mortgage faff, and we're FTB's.

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Has anyone any experiences of buying a concrete house ?

We have found an ideal house with very large front and rear gardens, with nice (brick) extensions in a nice area. It pretty much our dream, (I'd have a seperate brick built workshop, cue Vick Reeves rubbing his legs.....)

But oviously the core of it is concrete, built in the 60's. Street view is showing no major problems and we're off to look at it in the next few days.

We do not need to organise finance, so no mortgage faff, and we're FTB's.

I've never heard of a concrete house but for me it would raise major concerns - is there a damp course? how thick are the walls? is there a cavity? Does the concrete have cancer? etc.

I would be very, very wary and make sure that you get a reasonably expensive and trustworthy surveyor to check it out first.

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It might be fine but....................

Heard of concrete cancer? What (occasionally) happenss is the steel reinforcing rusts, weekening the structure. The building can possibly become structurally unsound/unmortgageable/dangerous. Cornwall has a local problem with MUNDIC construction.

Before viewing I suggest you speak to the local council - they should be able to give you some guidance.

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sorry yes, I should have mentioned I've spent all last week puching concrete cancer into google. Infact it was HUTH, that orginally made me aware of this problem some nupties had bought a house with no knoweldge of this at all thinking they were getting a bargin and the presenter then proceeded to tell them on camera what the problems were.

It seems there are firms that will basically rebuild your house for you and we may have to factor this in.

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It's a catchy name isn't it, 'concretre cancer'? But do take a look at the facts, concrete can be very good from a structural point of view and shouldn't be dismissed out of hand.

The main problem with a concrete structure is that it can be hard to insulate properly without adding thickness to the walls on the inside and hence losing floor area.

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Be careful with concrete houses. It will probably be a 1950's ex-local authority house. Although you have stated that you don't need a mortgage to buy it, there will come a time when you may want to move on and you really need to consider it's mortgagability.

At present with the lenders being extremely cautious, its unlikely that such a property will be mortgageable - I looked into this about 4 months ago on a property I was considering buying. At the peak of the market the property was bought for £250k and couldn't be shifted at £150K for this reason (and location was excellent).

There are however companies that exist that essentially rebuild the shell of the property for 20 to 30K to the standard brick build. It might be an idea to look into this and get a quote done before purchasing. Also take a look at the nieghbouring properties (chances are that ther will be a few of them) and see if any work has been done and if so give them a knock to see what work has been done, how much it cost and whether they would recommend.

Best of luck - it could be a great buy but please be careful.

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Has anyone any experiences of buying a concrete house ?

We have found an ideal house with very large front and rear gardens, with nice (brick) extensions in a nice area. It pretty much our dream, (I'd have a seperate brick built workshop, cue Vick Reeves rubbing his legs.....)

But oviously the core of it is concrete, built in the 60's. Street view is showing no major problems and we're off to look at it in the next few days.

We do not need to organise finance, so no mortgage faff, and we're FTB's.

I live in a concrete house. It was built by Laings, and is called a "Laings Easy Form " it is mortgagable but not by some banks (barclays for instance) as some of these banks have a blanket policy of not lending on "non standard" or concrete houses and so tar all of them with the same brush which is unfair.

My house is made of Poured concrete and has a huge cavity between the twin walls......now full of insulation and the house is wonderfully insulated..!

Halifax lent me the money to buy my brothers share, as it was an inheritance. I do not regret buying for one moment and quite the reverse. Lowest council tax band too !

Steer clear of prefab concrete houses ! and also any with steel rods in. It would be advisable to find out who built them and then phone the big valuers (connelies?? not sure of name) and see if its on their list of mortgagable properties. If it is then get a good survey done and if ok and you still like, then go for it. (not for you to take a mortgage out but just to reassure you that many banks have faith in them )The walls on mine are bullet proof. In theory concrete never stops hardening because of the chemical reaction that occurs once mixed. Obviously most hardening happens within the first few weeks but thats the theory anyway.

Edited by GinAndPlatonic

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thanks for all the replies.

We viewed it a few days ago and it is completely up together. Apart from being a bit dated, the current owners have kept it very clean and tidy.

Yes it is prefab concrete, the house was built in 48, that much we have found. I have lined up a builder who is going to come and have a look on our second viewing. The owner said that perhaps the inner wall is made from breeze blocks and only the outside features these concrete slabs. I can see no rust stains or "spalling" as it is termed inside or outside. The only slight worry is what should be an RSJ across the middle of the lounge I think is a concrete beam with steel rods inside.

There is a back boiler behind the gas fire in the lounge I have heard these are pretty ineficient.

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  • 225 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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