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Theatre Ticket Sales Down 90%


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Rubbish films too.

I'm finding it harder and harder to summon up much enthusiasm for a lot of modern films.

We've had periods in the past with pointless remakes (late 70s) and film marquees that looked like football scores (late 80s) but I dunno, there's not much to grab me any more.

Soulless, mechanical, cartoonish. And that's just the Transformers films.

A lot of modern films I wouldn't bother downloading for free.

I am reminded of Alan Arkin in Gross Pointe Blank, discussing the Energizer bunny, criticizing it, “It's got no brain, it's go not blood, it's got no anima!"

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Me too. If we really want to see a film we go to a small 2 screen privately owned cinema, where the £15 entrance keeps the chavs away. Sit in big sofas and can even take alcoholic drinks in from the bar. A pleasant night out.

Agree 100%

If its not the very posh seats at the Leicester Square Odeon I ain't going.

Shame I don't still live in Romford as the Vue there had special viewings for more mature customers (over 18), or I could nip in during the day. Sometimes they had showings for an older audience only.

But an evening show full of kiddults with iPhones? Forget it.

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Watershed at Bristol manages to show good films at a decent price whilst keeping out the chavs. Lottery funded though, so I doubt it could stay running on its own.

Not planning to see the Hoff, but I regularly see shows at the Hippodrome. It is pricey, about 60 to 80 for the nicer seats, but the theatre doesn't generally suffer from chavs anyway. I stay away from the likes of Odeon and Vue on the pain of death.

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I worked in several cinemas during the late 80s/early 90s recession, and for us it was a boom. Part of the reason was a succession of good films, both Hollywood and British; but more importantly, people who had previously gone to the theatre, gigs, sporting events and other forms of live entertainment downsized to the pictures. In other words, there were a large number of people who wanted to go out for their entertainment, but could no longer afford the high end.

In those days, however, cinema tickets were a lot cheaper in real terms than they are now, and the price/quality profile of home entertainment hardware and software (basically VHS, with a tiny fraction of committed geeks having laserdisc - but the latter were not the sort of people who would go to the cinema anyway) could not compete with the multiplexes going up at the time. I doubt if the cinema industry will benefit from the downturn this time around: they've priced themselves out of the market and are in direct competition with home cinema gear from China, DVDs and BDs.

Cinema is a complete rip off these days and I can see them all closing at some point. Last trip out for me GF and her kid left me will little change from £50 if you include the overpriced sweets and ice cream.

As well as better home equipment, cinemas will start to lose out to upcomming boom in on-demand movie services which is set to become very fiercely competitive market over the next year. Even DVDs/blueray will die at some point - within 5 years or so 80% of movie and TV content will be bought using some on-demand service.

I also see games making big inroads into movies as mainstream entertainment - already some of the top games have production quality (art/scripting/acting etc) rivaling low budget movies. The basic economics favour gaming heavily - 5-10 million to develop an A list title.

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I also see games making big inroads into movies as mainstream entertainment - already some of the top games have production quality (art/scripting/acting etc) rivaling low budget movies. The basic economics favour gaming heavily - 5-10 million to develop an A list title.

I think they already have, given that a lot of new films are merely CGI "games" graphics without the interactive element.

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Cinema is a complete rip off these days and I can see them all closing at some point. Last trip out for me GF and her kid left me will little change from £50 if you include the overpriced sweets and ice cream.

As well as better home equipment, cinemas will start to lose out to upcomming boom in on-demand movie services which is set to become very fiercely competitive market over the next year. Even DVDs/blueray will die at some point - within 5 years or so 80% of movie and TV content will be bought using some on-demand service.

I also see games making big inroads into movies as mainstream entertainment - already some of the top games have production quality (art/scripting/acting etc) rivaling low budget movies. The basic economics favour gaming heavily - 5-10 million to develop an A list title.

Suggest binning the g/f - sounds like high maintenance..biggrin.gif

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Watershed at Bristol manages to show good films at a decent price whilst keeping out the chavs. Lottery funded though, so I doubt it could stay running on its own.

The economic model that this sector uses only works with significant taxpayer subsidy. These sorts of places tend to screen foreign-language, archival rerelease and other minority interest titles on a break-even basis at best. Every so often you get a crossover title that does unexpectedly well, but that is not very often. Basically, these places simply don't show the type of stuff that the chavs want to see.

In the late '90s a company called City Screen started up that tried a new business model, consisting of half-and-half mainstream Hollywood/British and traditional arthouse fare. The idea was that the former would subside the latter, and also attract the sort of customer who wanted to see mainstream product, but not in chav-infested multiplex fleapit. For a while - really, I'd say, until the DVD really took hold in 2003-05 - they did really well. I worked for one of their sites for a while in the early days, and it was clear that they'd found a new customer base. They went for small (2-4 screens usually) venues in inner cities with good public transport links. Their cinemas had upscale, poncy bars (we're talking Pinot Grigio at £5 a glass rather than pints), many of which later added a small-scale food offering, gastropub-ish, but with more limited menus. They were generous with legroom and invested in decent projection and audio. The problem was that they overextended themselves too quickly, opening up a load of new sites on borrowed money, until the company was eventually taken over by some venture capitalists in the mid-00s. They show mainly mainstream stuff now, and the last I knew were also trying live theatre and opera HD telecasts, charging more than you'd pay to see a film but less than to see the play or opera live.

But even there are cinema devotees who believe that no home entertainment experience compares with being in a cinema with a large audience, the sheer cost of the tickets now, compared with the cost and quality of home cinema gear, mean that they are a dwindling crowd.

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Athens suffered the same phenomenon.

If you are a tourist destination, you have to expect your 'regulars' to avoid you like the plague as many seek to exploit the so-called tourist bonanza...from taxi wallers to hotels, to people who cook food.

Good time to be out of the country.

Hmmm ....

Should take some time to think what part of the world gets my tourist spend during that time. Given the season, heading north has appeal.

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given that I wont pay £20 to watch a football mathc or a tenner for the cinema,then 60 quid to subsidise the eating habits of some luvvies is a definite nono.

Which football team is that? My tickets (Villa) normally around 36-45 mark. Saying that we did get 4 for £20 (2 adults/2kids) for one match this season on a family promotion.

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  • 415 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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