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2M Public Sector Workers Striking.has Anyone Noticed?


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But other people's kids will be the next generation of tax payers (or benefit recipients or criminals), so you still have a vested interest whether you like it or not.

Just seen another gem on the news "We deserve it because we do jobs that no-one else wants to do".

Not if I move overseas. :D

BBC reporting seems to be balanced so far.

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GMB union boss Paul Kenny on ITV news said that no-one from the private sector had told him that they didn't think it was fair that they are paying for pensions that they couldn't afford themselves. Also, it doesn't benefit private sector workers if public sector pensions are cut (where to begin with that!).

I shall be sending him a short email. I'm sure he would love to hear from more private sector workers, because apparently he's never heard from any of us before.

Paul Kenny

Contact: GMB, 22-24 Worple Rd, London SW19 4DD

Tel: 020 8947 3131

Email paul.kenny@gmb.org.uk

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I'm not a big fan of Jeremy Clarkson, but I'm close to agreeing with his opinion about the strikers on The One Show tonight:

I would like someone to ask the strikers on the news what they think about Greece and whether the workers there are right to strike for the same reasons.

Edited by MiCasaSuCasa
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2M Public Sector Workers Striking

So 2 million Public Sector Workers don`t understand you can`t have what`s not in the pot.

The case of the Headmaster who retires on a pension of £1,000+ a week. If he has 25 years of retirement, better than a lottery win. :rolleyes:

With many children leaving school with a low three Rs. <_<

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So 2 million Public Sector Workers don`t understand you can`t have what`s not in the pot.

The case of the Headmaster who retires on a pension of £1,000+ a week. If he has 25 years of retirement, better than a lottery win. :rolleyes:

With many children leaving school with a low three Rs. <_<

Charlie....you have summed up this thread in one. ;)

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The burning dustbin of oil could probably create its own micro economy.

First you need the bin delivered, that's a driver, then a guy to deliver the oil, another one. Then you need to erect a barrier. COSHH forms for the oil and a risk assessment for the whole process. Couple of managers to watch the whole process, purchasing officers etc. Disposal forms as well, and a recycling firm to tow the whole lot away.

Before you know it you'er employing 50 people. This is a serious business.

That description exactly fits what happens in public service.

Having said that a lot of the private sector is very similar. Security guards everywhere, people to hand out trays in restaurants, people to hold "space here" signs at till queues in supermarkets etc etc. The private sector list is almost as endless as the public sector list.

It's very like the post WW2 overmanning and restrictive practices said to be so detrimental to the UK economy in those days. Of course all that stuff was sorted out in the 80s :lol::lol:

Edited by billybong
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Yes, but also increased numbers of public sector workers and rapid pay rises over the last 13 years.

If we had 1997 employment levels with wages ~ 30% below equivilent private sector workers then no problem, it's the 2010 employment levels with pay at parity or better that makes these schemes unfair and unaffordable.

So at the end of the day it was Gordon Brown who wrecked both their pensions and ours; I don't remember the unions and the public sector coming out on strike whilst the private sector schemes were being destroyed by tax and regulatory changes.

For sure they knew that all that lovely "free money" grabbed from the private sector schemes would be heading in the direction of public sector jobs, wages and pensions.

So job's a goodun. No strikes necessary.

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That description exactly fits what happens in public service.

Having said that a lot of the private sector is very similar. Security guards everywhere, people to hand out trays in restaurants, people to hold "space here" signs at till queues in supermarkets etc etc. The private sector list is almost as endless as the public sector sector list.

Private businesses HAVE to make profit to survive

Difference is you can go to another restauant / supermaket, we are stuck with one public sector which we have to pay for

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Most people have missed the point of the strike today.

I admit that a large portion of the public sector don't 'get it' but most actually do.

I and others knew that going out wouldn't change a thing and the money for these current pensions can't be found. But this is the thin end of the wedge.

All governments have shafted the private sector for over thirty years now so what comparisons are going to be made in the future? Public sector pensions are one turd a year, but that's outragous 'cos private pensions are half a turd per year on average, strip them of that half a turd now!!!!!

I gladly lost a day's pay for nothing today just so the toffs know that each time they take a running kick to my gonads, I'm not just spreading my legs whilst dothing my cap. But I know my nads are going to be walloped anyway.

This dividing is going the same way as the occupy movement where the 'elite' are pitching serf against serf with a similar soundbite to 'they don't know what they're protesting about'. Maybe lots didn't today, but they are scared and rightly worried about their future.

Most aren't boomers. They have the same worries as you about houses. Most are renting or only have crappy one-bed flats. I don't know any who drive 4x4s. So cut them some slack, many will be unemployed soon anyway so that they can actually enjoy a 5% payrise courtesy of welfare.

My God, it wouldn't be so bad if any of these 1% could possibly lead by example!

(I work in both sectors BTW) :P

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the clue's in the first sentence.....'gauging levels of disruption'.

I realise it may be hard for you to grasp but the value of a strike is in the scale of disruption and inconvenience it can cause,which then weighs in on the settlement.

whilst I agree it's frustrating that low paid workers are subsidising fred the shreds pension,the same can be said for the private sector.are they on strike for subsidised pensions?

at the end of the day,these parasites want our kids to work to 80 so they can retire at 50/60 on any one of a variety of generous schemes.recent public sector entrants are on nowhere near the 2/3 final salary level of payout.but there's already enough on the roster to sink the rest of us.

I appreciate they signed a generous contract many years ago,full of promises in our kids names,I'm jsut amazed at the way they manage to dissociate the 'they' in 'they owe us',from the kids who will have to foot the bill.

If the future went in the very vague direction you are waving at, I woudn't cheer.

Edited by bankfeeder
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Rain, on 30 November 2011 - 08:12 PM, said:I've worked most of my life in the public sector

Rain, on 30 November 2011 - 09:43 PM, said:I don't have public sector arrogance. I've never worked for them

:wacko:

It's easy to forget!:lol:

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All governments have shafted the private sector for over thirty years now so what comparisons are going to be made in the future? Public sector pensions are one turd a year, but that's outragous 'cos private pensions are half a turd per year on average

Half a turd? Most are lucky to get that!

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Most people have missed the point of the strike today.

I admit that a large portion of the public sector don't 'get it' but most actually do.

I and others knew that going out wouldn't change a thing and the money for these current pensions can't be found. But this is the thin end of the wedge.

All governments have shafted the private sector for over thirty years now so what comparisons are going to be made in the future? Public sector pensions are one turd a year, but that's outragous 'cos private pensions are half a turd per year on average, strip them of that half a turd now!!!!!

I gladly lost a day's pay for nothing today just so the toffs know that each time they take a running kick to my gonads, I'm not just spreading my legs whilst dothing my cap. But I know my nads are going to be walloped anyway.

This dividing is going the same way as the occupy movement where the 'elite' are pitching serf against serf with a similar soundbite to 'they don't know what they're protesting about'. Maybe lots didn't today, but they are scared and rightly worried about their future.

Most aren't boomers. They have the same worries as you about houses. Most are renting or only have crappy one-bed flats. I don't know any who drive 4x4s. So cut them some slack, many will be unemployed soon anyway so that they can actually enjoy a 5% payrise courtesy of welfare.

My God, it wouldn't be so bad if any of these 1% could possibly lead by example!

(I work in both sectors BTW) :P

This would be fine if the public sector bods showed some solidarity back in 2003. But they didn't. In fact they voted in Bliar and Clown again just to rub it in our faces.

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This would be fine if the public sector bods showed some solidarity back in 2003. But they didn't. In fact they voted in Bliar and Clown again just to rub it in our faces.

I can only speak for myself and a few others but I didn't vote Labour back in after I first voted in 97. We're not all 'I'm alright Jack' voters.

All our leader are criminals of some sort. None are worth the effort.

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Most people have missed the point of the strike today.

I admit that a large portion of the public sector don't 'get it' but most actually do.

I and others knew that going out wouldn't change a thing and the money for these current pensions can't be found. But this is the thin end of the wedge.

All governments have shafted the private sector for over thirty years now so what comparisons are going to be made in the future? Public sector pensions are one turd a year, but that's outragous 'cos private pensions are half a turd per year on average, strip them of that half a turd now!!!!!

I gladly lost a day's pay for nothing today just so the toffs know that each time they take a running kick to my gonads, I'm not just spreading my legs whilst dothing my cap. But I know my nads are going to be walloped anyway.

This dividing is going the same way as the occupy movement where the 'elite' are pitching serf against serf with a similar soundbite to 'they don't know what they're protesting about'. Maybe lots didn't today, but they are scared and rightly worried about their future.

Most aren't boomers. They have the same worries as you about houses. Most are renting or only have crappy one-bed flats. I don't know any who drive 4x4s. So cut them some slack, many will be unemployed soon anyway so that they can actually enjoy a 5% payrise courtesy of welfare.

My God, it wouldn't be so bad if any of these 1% could possibly lead by example!

(I work in both sectors BTW) :P

Stating that it's all about fooling people to fall out with each other is not a good enough argument, the maths fail, simple as that

Listening today to a teacher complaining about having to work until 67 in a classroom didn't go down well with my mates who are welders/mechanics and tree surgeons but public sector unions don't care about them carrying on slogging away until they are 67 with no Gov't subsidised pension and I doubt most of the strikers do either

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  • 439 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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