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2M Public Sector Workers Striking.has Anyone Noticed?


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as per above.just interested in gauging the levels of disruption.

all I've seen is my gym-council- is shut.that's it.lad's school is open,roads ticking over,shops open...etc etc..

most of my public sector friends are working.

presume the main disruption is at schools,causing childcare head aches for a lot of people.

gotta add,there's zero sympathy out there.

generally speaking,zero sympathy,even amongst friends who are public sector.there are an increasing number who realise how unsustainable the system is.

Why would shops be closed or roads not 'tick over'?

If my friends, I've seen at least five who wouldn't even have considered joining the union a couple if years ago walk out today. Don't underestimate how fed up modestly paid workers are at taking the hit for a crisis caused by others.

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Yeah, the roads were quieter, I'm liking it!

I went for a bimble on my motorcycle first thing this morning, and what a delight it was - just like New Years Day. Roads empty - bliss!

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What does the average single person get for their tax?

Bins collected?

Some security, although I've never, ever called the police or fire.

Seen a GP maybe 3 times in my life. Had some jabs as a kid. Never been to hospital in the UK.

I doubt my schooling cost much. Things were very shoestring back in the 80s/90s.

Oddly, the only times I've been in an ambulance and hospital is while abroad. Paid full price, which is about half a days tax in the UK.

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I went for a bimble on my motorcycle first thing this morning, and what a delight it was - just like New Years Day. Roads empty - bliss!

I drive to work everyday through South West London on my Vespa. The journey was amazing today. Hardly any 4x4s and very little traffic.

Please can there be a strike every day :P

Edited by swankyman
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Don't underestimate how fed up modestly paid workers are at taking the hit for a crisis caused by others.

A pity they don't realise the only reason they have work in the first place is due to the poor decisions made by the last government that led to the crisis. Tell them to find other work, we can't afford them, and we don't need them.

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2 million people who drive in to work each morning and sit in a cubicle for 8 hours, then drive home.

Of course with lots of stress, threats, deadlines, pressure. But never does anything get produced from those cubicles.

If we fired all 2 million of them and their average total compensation is £50,000 pounds a year. We would save £100 billion pounds a year. And be about halfway to closing the annual deficit.

Edited by aa3
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A pity they don't realise the only reason they have work in the first place is due to the poor decisions made by the last government that led to the crisis. Tell them to find other work, we can't afford them, and we don't need them.

Great idea - let's sack all teachers, hospital support staff, binmen, border control staff. Who'd miss them? Certainly not those constantly bemoaning fortnightly bin collections or supposed open borders.

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Why would shops be closed or roads not 'tick over'?

If my friends, I've seen at least five who wouldn't even have considered joining the union a couple if years ago walk out today. Don't underestimate how fed up modestly paid workers are at taking the hit for a crisis caused by others.

Really? None of them have massive mortgages or creditcard/store debt up past their eyeballs? You must hang out with a pretty elite group.

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My daughter's school is open today but the traffic was much lighter so I suspect some people have kept their kids at home because they assumed it was closed or just to be bloody-minded.

However, I am concerned at all of those equality assessments, access policies and Standard Operating Procedures telling you how to write Standard Operating Procedures or climb the stairs safely that are going unwritten today. Truly terrifying.

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Standard Operating Procedures telling you how to write Standard Operating Procedures ... are going unwritten today. Truly terrifying.

I once worked for a plc that had a book of SOPs. SOP number 1 was - how to write an SOP.

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However, I am concerned at all of those equality assessments, access policies and Standard Operating Procedures telling you how to write Standard Operating Procedures or climb the stairs safely that are going unwritten today. Truly terrifying.

Worry not tallburt, I doubt very much that anyone behind the front line is actually striking today.

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Great idea - let's sack all teachers, hospital support staff, binmen, border control staff. Who'd miss them? Certainly not those constantly bemoaning fortnightly bin collections or supposed open borders.

we need them, maybe not the border patrols as its our public benefits that attracts the immigrants, but the others...sure thing...Its just that we are paying too much for them.

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Why would shops be closed or roads not 'tick over'?

If my friends, I've seen at least five who wouldn't even have considered joining the union a couple if years ago walk out today. Don't underestimate how fed up modestly paid workers are at taking the hit for a crisis caused by others.

They're not 'taking the hit for a crisis caused by others' in this case - they're being asked to face up to the fact that their existing pension benefits are simply unsustainable in the longer terms. Their scheme isn't funded to anything like the level that would pay out what is currently promised and the taxpayer is expected to make up the shortfall. Nothing to do with the current economic mess, separate issue.

I've yet to see any of them admit that the schemes are unworkable or acknowledge that the productive sector of the population are going to be soaked to make up the difference so that they can have generous pensions.

Meanwhile, for workers in productive jobs, pensions are considerably less generous because they have to reflect economic realities. Still, why should those workers begrudge paying even more tax so that those in the public sector can have a considerably more comfortable retirement than themselves and what pesky economics dictates?

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Great idea - let's sack all teachers, hospital support staff, binmen, border control staff. Who'd miss them? Certainly not those constantly bemoaning fortnightly bin collections or supposed open borders.

I don't think anyone is saying we don't need 'front line' public sector workers. What we don't need is the huge army of 'support' staff that sprung up under the Labour regime - outreach officers, diversity coordinators, communications directors (ie, propagandists) etc. After '97 the papers were full of these kinds of jobs offering eye-watering salaries.

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Drove my wife to the station this morning, very little traffic and very few cars parked in the no parking charge parts of the approach road to the station.

Was out later on to take my aged neighbour shopping and notice a lot of traffic heading for town, could it turn into a good day for the shops?

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