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Landlady Wants To Increase Rent By 84 A Month

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How would you reply this? We pay on time every month! So far 33,600. Have argued that our cost of living has soared but we remain committed

to paying rent and 'a bird in the hand' Any other arguments welcome. HB reduced, student numbers going down. Her costs have not increased at all.

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How would you reply this? We pay on time every month! So far 33,600. Have argued that our cost of living has soared but we remain committed

to paying rent and 'a bird in the hand' Any other arguments welcome. HB reduced, student numbers going down. Her costs have not increased at all.

By moving. What area?

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How would you reply this? We pay on time every month! So far 33,600. Have argued that our cost of living has soared but we remain committed

to paying rent and 'a bird in the hand' Any other arguments welcome. HB reduced, student numbers going down. Her costs have not increased at all.

Reply with your notice

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How would you reply this? We pay on time every month! So far 33,600. Have argued that our cost of living has soared but we remain committed

to paying rent and 'a bird in the hand' Any other arguments welcome. HB reduced, student numbers going down. Her costs have not increased at all.

If you're willing to move out then call her bluff. Do it once she can do it again.

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Ask her where on earth she is getting her 6% increase from - and compare to the 2.6% that is in the CPI as Rent.

Alternatively - look at what existing equivalent places are advertised for and show those with a 'we can just move out to one of these - you don't really want the hassle'

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How would you reply this? We pay on time every month! So far 33,600. Have argued that our cost of living has soared but we remain committed

to paying rent and 'a bird in the hand' Any other arguments welcome. HB reduced, student numbers going down. Her costs have not increased at all.

Try screaming 'F**K OFF' as loudly as you can, about an inch away from her face so that spittle goes in her eyes.

Or you could opt for a less subtle approach

Choice is yours really

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If you're willing to move out then call her bluff. Do it once she can do it again.

Our reply:

Thank you for your message and we would like to add that we love living at 1 the Footpath and have really enjoyed our experience here, however, we have also had a very difficult year with family illness in both our families and have just about managed to cope with our responsibilities and our lives accordingly. We remain loyal to our mutual rental agreement and understand you have been fair with your contribution to this.

We are not saying we are going to leave, However, we may have to reconsider our current arrangements. To be really frank £1,400 a month for a 2 bedroom ex-council house is steep in the real world and as the current economy doesn't support this. I would like to ask you a very human question... How much do you need an extra £84 per month and how much do you think there are people like us out there right now who will sustain and pay your rent and be as reliable as we have proved to be?

Having read the headlines on increasing rents, particularly in London, I'm not surprised that you're putting the rent up. However, tenant arrears are also on the rise. In the two years we've been here, we've paid out £33,600. We have both been suffering in the recession with less employment, rising fuel and food bills, yet we have remained committed to paying the rent on time every month.

We often question whether the high cost of living in London is worth it and so far it has been, but there is a tipping point. We cannot, in all honesty commit ourselves to another 12 month lease at an increased cost because quite frankly, we can't afford it.

Kind regards,

It is our tipping point.

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We pay on time every month! So far 33,600.

You have become institutionalised. Start looking elsewhere, within a few weeks your likely find something else which is better for less money.

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You might want to edit your post that gives your address to the forum....

Assuming sw15 address listed is where you live. You appear to be paying around the going rate for a £380k house.

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You might want to edit your post that gives your address to the forum....

Assuming sw15 address listed is where you live. You appear to be paying around the going rate for a £380k house.

So it's fine to be paying that for a 2 bed house and we should be swallowing the increase?

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You might want to edit your post that gives your address to the forum....

Assuming sw15 address listed is where you live. You appear to be paying around the going rate for a £380k house.

Just what I was thinking.

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Our reply:

Thank you for your message and we would like to add that we love living at 1 the Footpath and have really enjoyed our experience here, however, we have also had a very difficult year with family illness in both our families and have just about managed to cope with our responsibilities and our lives accordingly. We remain loyal to our mutual rental agreement and understand you have been fair with your contribution to this.

We are not saying we are going to leave, However, we may have to reconsider our current arrangements. To be really frank £1,400 a month for a 2 bedroom ex-council house is steep in the real world and as the current economy doesn't support this. I would like to ask you a very human question... How much do you need an extra £84 per month and how much do you think there are people like us out there right now who will sustain and pay your rent and be as reliable as we have proved to be?

Having read the headlines on increasing rents, particularly in London, I'm not surprised that you're putting the rent up. However, tenant arrears are also on the rise. In the two years we've been here, we've paid out £33,600. We have both been suffering in the recession with less employment, rising fuel and food bills, yet we have remained committed to paying the rent on time every month.

We often question whether the high cost of living in London is worth it and so far it has been, but there is a tipping point. We cannot, in all honesty commit ourselves to another 12 month lease at an increased cost because quite frankly, we can't afford it.

Kind regards,

It is our tipping point.

Too wordy, get to the point quicker.

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With rents like those, I cannot see why anyone wants to live in London! You could take a massive pay cut, move out, pay less rent and still be better off.

Thanks, that's where we're heading.

So, with squeezes on HB, a 12% reduction of students from next year, are current rents really sustainable? Of course not. And a sensible landlord should appreciate long-term gains over short-term profit.

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If you're willing to move out then call her bluff. Do it once she can do it again.

Yep. This is the problem. Once she knows she can get away with it, she could keep doing it. It is a bit of hassle to move, and she knows that probably outweighs the £84 extra per month.

How high is the rent compared to other properties in the area? It doesn't really matter if it is an ex-council house - if that were in the middle of Covent Garden, it would be worth a lot more regardless of what it looked like. I live much further out in Surbiton, and any type of two bed house for £1,400 would be cheap in the nice part of town.

The bottom line is she won't want to lose you as a tenant - you have always paid on time and you have shown that you are prepared to stay in the house for a longish period of time. Unless she genuinely believes she is getting well under market value for the house, I doubt she would push this too hard at the risk of losing a good tenant.

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personally,I'd point out that if she forces the increase you'll hand your notice over and you'll be sure to not allow viewings meaning she's going to be wearing at least a months's void if not more.

take no sh1t of these people.it amazes me how many are acting like it's 2007.

Thanks for that. We will be as awkward a possible.

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So it's fine to be paying that for a 2 bed house and we should be swallowing the increase?

That's not what I said. I said it looks to be about the going rate. We looked at moving around there 18 months ago and the rents were ludicrous for some really nasty little places.

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You could always counter that you were considering moving to a cheaper place, but thought you might stay here if the rent remained the same. To the landlord, "I know it would work out better for you too as even one months void would be much more than the rent increase". A barter is a two way process.

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The bottom line is she won't want to lose you as a tenant - you have always paid on time and you have shown that you are prepared to stay in the house for a longish period of time. Unless she genuinely believes she is getting well under market value for the house, I doubt she would push this too hard at the risk of losing a good tenant.

LL's in general may think this, or increasingly start to think this. However, one indivdual LL can be as irrational as she likes. If your going to play hardball you have to mean it.

Start getting large boxes and putting your stuff in it. Start spending your evening getting a feel for the area, and start spending your weekends looking at other properties that are better for the same price, or the same for less money. Your quickly figure out if its worth paying the extra, or if you were foolish to stay as longas you did. Then either pay up or move on and never look back.

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That's not what I said. I said it looks to be about the going rate. We looked at moving around there 18 months ago and the rents were ludicrous for some really nasty little places.

The current rise in rents is a temporary factor, people are being mercilessly squeezed by high fuel and food bills and frozen pay packets. Our lovely landlady could indeed put the rent up by a couple of hundred a month but have to deal with voids and non-payment. Let's not forget that this is an ex-council house, bought with right to buy and at a third of the prices now. £80,000 max in total? £16,800 a year rental but she wants more?

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You might also want to say something along the lines of 'If we do move out, then on average you would expect a void of 4-6 weeks between tenants when you will get no rent. Assuming 1 month rental loss to yourself - it would take over 16months at the higher level to make back the amount that you have lost due to the void period"

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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