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Kirstie Allsopp: " My Priority Is Empire Building"

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/fameandfortune/8870634/Kirstie-Allsopp-My-priority-is-empire-building.html

Kirstie Allsopp: 'My priority is empire building'

Kirstie Allsopp, the TV presenter and property guru, tells us how she plans to control her financial future.

By Sarah Ewing

8:00AM GMT 06 Nov 2011

Kirstie Allsopp, 40, is the popular television presenter of shows such as Location, Location, Location and author of several books, including her newest release, Kirstie Allsopp Craft. She splits her time between London and her cottage win Devon with her partner Ben and their two children, who are five and three.

How did your childhood influence your work ethic and attitude to money?

My parents' work ethic had a great impact on me. Growing up, I knew my mother did work, but it was always in the background so it didn't impact upon us as a family.

As a young child I understood what daddy did [Charles was the chairman of Christie's auction house] and I was very proud of what he did. I knew what a serious and involved job it was and I found it very strange that there were kids at my school who didn't grasp what their parents actually did for work.

My parents taught me that working can redeem you, sometimes in the most difficult situations, and that by getting up and going to work, you can get through it.

As we lived in the countryside it wasn't feasible for me to have a Saturday job when I was younger, but as soon as I was old enough I was helping my dad at Christie's. It was never expected of me to go to university and, say, become a doctor because I didn't come from that sort of professional background.

In fact, while my parents taught me the importance of work, my mother probably assumed I would be like her and get married and have children. In the nicest possible way, she supported my father in his work, looked after us and then did something she found interesting. What money she did earn went towards her own clothes and our holidays.

Have you ever wondered how you were going to make ends meet?

Thankfully, my parents have always been of the firm belief that you help your kids get a roof over their head when they move out (I was 21) and give them four safe wheels, but that you don't give that help to them directly in cash, so I was all right in that I had a place to live and a car. However, my first job as an editorial assistant at Country Living magazine in the early Nineties only paid £12,000 a year and this was at a time when interest rates on mortgages were at 15pc, so I was always worried about where my next electricity payment was going to come from.

Are you more of a saver or a spender?

That's a really difficult question. I believe in buying property so I'd say I was a conservative spender. In the current climate when inflation is higher than interest rates, what on earth is the point of putting it in the bank?

I do love children's clothes even though with boys your choice is somewhat limited. Before the children, I used to love buying shoes, but now I get immense satisfaction from wearing things I've had for years as I take good care of them or recycle them into something new.

What's the hardest lesson you've learnt in your career about money?

Luckily, I haven't had any dramatically hard lessons, but I think that's in part due to me being a fast learner. In this world, if you don't learn fast from your mistakes before they develop into larger problems, you die. And I think knowing the importance of manners in every aspect of your life pays dividends, as you'll get respect if you give it. That's why I'm a great writer of thank you letters and why my kids know how to do introductions with proper eye contact and genuine smiles.

Is there anything about the business world that you don't like?

I rail against the fact that 30 years ago one in four newspaper stories were positive and now only one in 18 stories are. This constant bashing and negativity is not healthy for the country and we're becoming desperately pessimistic.

I'm also frustrated that we've got to the point where children are leaving school not understanding a mortgage, compound interest, basic budgeting and credit. How can they be taught about every single world religion and not know how to function in the real world? Schools need to put a real emphasis on home economics, so they're competent at sewing, balancing their money and cooking on a budget.

What's been your best buy or business decision?

About seven years ago I was at a property auction and I'd been guided as to what my top bid should be. But the bidding in the room was so furious I recognised that the property was worth a lot more than I'd been told it was, so I went well above what my recommended top bid was and the property is now worth so much more than what I paid for it.

You need to be able to gauge quickly what other people are willing to pay for something and figure out why that is. I love buying things at auction – I wish all property was sold this way.

I'm also trying to teach my boys to question the value of things they want. I was recently down Golborne Road [near Portobello Road] with my son, Bay, who collects paperweights. One of the marketeers (who I all know) quoted him £5 for three paperweights and Bay turned to me for his money, but I said to him: "Bay, why don't you check that it's really £5 he needs as there are only three? Are they actually worth more than £1 each?" Judging the value of something can be hard but you have to question other people politely when they state their opinion.

If you're willing to compromise and buy quality second-hand you can pick up great bargains. We've got this amazing fridge in our London house that should be worth £4,000, but we only paid £750. How did I do it?

In areas where property prices have remained high, there is a more frequent renovation rate as they tailor décor, fixtures and fittings to their taste, and as a result they chuck out perfectly good things.

Have you ever had an investment not turn out as well as you'd hoped?

The flat I bought before I moved in with Ben. I was determined to buy something my dog was happy in and there weren't many flats with gardens for a decent price, so I paid over the odds. I can't believe I bought a flat because of the dog; putting pets before sensible financial choices is crazy.

How do you prefer to pay for things – cash, or debt or credit card?

I use my debit card. I do have a credit card, but I'm not even sure where it is right now. It's an American Express card because it's linked into BA miles and I love collecting them. I've got enough now so that Ben and I can go to India in March.

How do you tip?

I'm an easy tipper. I was actually surprised when I heard that statistically women were worse tippers than men. In fact, I'm probably an over-tipper, except when I was in New York recently and apparently the norm is 20pc, so over there I'm not such a great tipper!

How do you feel about investing in stocks and shares?

I can't even get my head around it and never have been able to. I think property is still a lot safer because while you can't control the overall market, you can still do a lot to buck the trend and you've certainly got more control over its value than you'd ever have owning stocks and shares. I can't imagine buying shares in a company where one person's actions could cause chaos.

Do you bank online?

Yes, I do. I feel totally comfortable. I even like the fake emails because they are so funny, especially seeing as I don't use any of the banks that I keep getting emailed about.

Do you use a financial adviser?

I don't, just my accountant. I don't see the need for anyone else.

Do you think pensions are a good idea?

The bank is desperate to sell me one, but I don't have one because of the nature of my work and I trust the property I own. Every single time I've been tempted to change my mind, something has happened in the market which would have had a negative impact on the unit value. I mean, how safe would it be to buy an annuity with the Bank of England just printing more money?

What's your financial priority for the next few years?

My priority is to work on brand development and empire building, while looking at the opportunity cost of my time. I've got a book deal, a range of homewares, and my shows. For me financially, it's about getting to a place where I have a range of things available with my name on it that I have control over.

But at the same time my priority is to look at each day of the year and say "How much is this day worth to me? Do I really need the money and be away from the children?" While the children are young, I really have to question how I spend my time.

Kirstie is launching National Antiques Week at the Winter Fine Art & Antiques Fair, Olympia on November 14. Vote for your favourite antiques shop at homesandantiques.com

Edited by Take Me Back To London!

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Woman born into wealth tells us how she did it.

Warning: This insightful article will take up to ten minutes of you life to read, given that you will never get this time back we advise that you read it whilst having a shit or making flapjacks.

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Free house, free car, job got by nepotism, 15 year bull market in your area of "expertise"

When I read things like this I do wonder whether the elite actually have any idea about normal life.

They genuinely believe they've worked harder than the kid of a council estate working 3 jobs to make their rent.

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Woman born into wealth tells us how she did it.

Warning: This insightful article will take up to ten minutes of you life to read, given that you will never get this time back we advise that you read it whilst having a shit or making flapjacks.

Excellent advice. I'd actually have been more interested in knowing how she got fat, but she probably got her 'gland problem' from her parents as well.

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Woman born into wealth tells us how she did it.

Warning: This insightful article will take up to ten minutes of you life to read, given that you will never get this time back we advise that you read it whilst having a shit or making flapjacks.

A thirty second skim read yielded this little gem....

In the current climate when inflation is higher than interest rates, what on earth is the point of putting it in the bank?

Now where have I heard that before? :rolleyes:.

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So, if you're at a property auction and you bid up to a your pre-dicided price but the bidding is so fast and furious that you recognised that the property was worth a lot more than you'd beem told it was.....

Jesus wept.

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Totally unqualified woman who regularly dispenses financial advice on TV admits that she doesn't understand shares or pensions and makes property decisions based on what she thinks her dog will like.

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I had a proper lunch time rant at work about Kirstie Alsopp. They were following her on twitter and "loving" her other show where she makes stuff. And she "seems really good at property".

I went off on it explaining she is everything is wrong with this country's economical situation and her complete lack of negoatiation skills and just her being extremely patronizing.

Nope. they didn't see it at all. I then realized I am part of a small community of questioning, cynical and angry people.

I wonder when the rest will become just that.

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Kirstie Allsopp, 40, is the popular television presenter of shows such as...

popular with who?

Thankfully, my parents have always been of the firm belief that you help your kids get a roof over their head when they move out

there's believing in it and having the money to do it.

What's the hardest lesson you've learnt in your career about money?

Luckily, I haven't had any dramatically hard lessons

no kidding. :rolleyes:

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"However, my first job as an editorial assistant at Country Living magazine in the early Nineties only paid £12,000 a year and this was at a time when interest rates on mortgages were at 15pc, so I was always worried about where my next electricity payment was going to come from."

If you're cold your daddy can stop it, oh yeah.

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What an odious little bitch she is.

Some people will dance when Margaret Thatcher dies, and that is their choice.

For me, it's Krusty who will provoke me into my dancing shoes when she throws a seven.

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At least she works for a living and isn't a benefits scrounger, so what if she comes from an aristocratic background?

I actually think the tax payers should be doing up a house of her choice at our expense because of the pleasure she brings to millions

Edited by Timak

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Totally unqualified woman who regularly dispenses financial advice on TV admits that she doesn't understand shares or pensions and makes property decisions based on what she thinks her dog will like.

I will never forget her being on Radio 4 (Radio 4, FFS!) saying, "Property prices will not fall because men will always want to put a roof over their wives' heads."

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I will never forget her being on Radio 4 (Radio 4, FFS!) saying, "Property prices will not fall because men will always want to put a roof over their wives' heads."

I put a roof over my wife's head and when prices fall to a sensible level I may buy one rather than renting.

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What an odious little bitch she is.

Some people will dance when Margaret Thatcher dies, and that is their choice.

For me, it's Krusty who will provoke me into my dancing shoes when she throws a seven.

I agree.

I even had the misfortune to share an airbus back from Nairobi last Sunday, where she had been with her family.

Luckily as far as could tell, we travelled in dIfferent cabins.

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"However, my first job as an editorial assistant at Country Living magazine in the early Nineties only paid £12,000 a year and this was at a time when interest rates on mortgages were at 15pc, so I was always worried about where my next electricity payment was going to come from."

If you're cold your daddy can stop it, oh yeah.

In a stunning exposé, posh frumpster Allsopp admits to accepting the salary of a commoner while working at a popular working class publication, and learns tough lessons about where electricity comes from.

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Totally unqualified woman who regularly dispenses financial advice on TV admits that she doesn't understand shares or pensions and makes property decisions based on what she thinks her dog will like.

:rolleyes: Yup.... :rolleyes:

As I've said before, many times:

THICK. F*CKING THICK in fact.

And FAT. FAT. FAT.

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Krusty's three things every child should know how to do ...

1 roast a chicken

2 crack an egg

3 fill in a mortgage application form

yes I know but she actually said this ...

"What came first the chicken, the egg or the mortgage application form?"

Kirstie Allsopp - poet, philosopher and salad-dodger.

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"What came first the chicken, the egg or the mortgage application form?"

Kirstie Allsopp - poet, philosopher and salad-dodger.

She reads this forum does she not?

There are members of Parliament whom have about the same intellectual capacity as this women, and they help to influence Government policy.

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What an odd interview. Who cares if she banks online?

Edit: though she does suggest she's 100% property as has no need for financial advice.

Edited by Ash4781

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It will be great day when all the index's show the property market crashing and someone manages to interview her. Will she have mouthfuls of her hat in her mouth I wonder.

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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