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New Build Rule Changes From 2016

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Was told yesterday by someone that from 2016 the building rules will change to mean any new builds have to be carbon neutral

And for the most part it'll mean no gas or oil heating being put in...

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Cripes. That'll make these houses staggeringly expensive to buy.

The exclusion of gas and oil heating is probably for the best; indigenous supplies are declining precipitously and faster than previously forecast. I also disagree with the wholesale burning of these fuels which are precious and difficult to replace chemical feedstocks for many industries (yes, they can be replaced, but at greatly increased cost).

However, carbon neutral will require staggering investment. I can only see it being done by a change in construction to mandate dramatically increased energy efficiency - triple-brick walls with double cavities, expensive "aerogel" insulation, removal of lofts and replacement with non-removable insulation - and the installation of expensive heating systems (such as heatpumps), with energy consumption supplemented by solar panels (or possibly the option for builders to be forced to invest in bigger projects, such as wind farms). And finally, by a dramatic reduction in dwelling size, and increase in density (save on the costs of insulation, by building terraces, cluster houses or blocks of flats).

I could easily see this type of construction adding 40k to the price of a typical 3 bed house.

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I'd be very reluctant to buy/rent a place without GCH. Is there a sensible way of heating a property with electricity? My perception is that doing so is expensive and inefficient at the moment.

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Was told yesterday by someone that from 2016 the building rules will change to mean any new builds have to be carbon neutral

And for the most part it'll mean no gas or oil heating being put in...

...ahh ..back to burning coal and logs..... :rolleyes:

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I'd be very reluctant to buy/rent a place without GCH. Is there a sensible way of heating a property with electricity? My perception is that doing so is expensive and inefficient at the moment.

It's best done with a heat pump (preferably ground source, but air source is acceptable, as long as the device can be sited so as not to annoy you or the neighbours with it's whirring).

Alternatively, storage heating is an option, using cheap night electricity. I don't mean with traditional storage heaters, but a water (or wax) filled thermal-storage tank, which essentially takes the place of a gas boiler in a regular heating system (i.e. it produced running hot water on demand, and pumps hot water into radiators on demand). However, thermal stores for central heating need to be enormous - 1000-2000 litres, so a suitable basement is required to install them. You can get them designed and installed by specialist heating engineers, but they are a niche product, so most installers won't even know what you are talking about.

I can actually forsee systems being built to combine both features - heat pump for high efficiency heating, and storage to take advantage of low-cost night rate electricity.

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It's best done with a heat pump (preferably ground source, but air source is acceptable, as long as the device can be sited so as not to annoy you or the neighbours with it's whirring).

Alternatively, storage heating is an option, using cheap night electricity. I don't mean with traditional storage heaters, but a water (or wax) filled thermal-storage tank, which essentially takes the place of a gas boiler in a regular heating system (i.e. it produced running hot water on demand, and pumps hot water into radiators on demand). However, thermal stores for central heating need to be enormous - 1000-2000 litres, so a suitable basement is required to install them. You can get them designed and installed by specialist heating engineers, but they are a niche product, so most installers won't even know what you are talking about.

I can actually forsee systems being built to combine both features - heat pump for high efficiency heating, and storage to take advantage of low-cost night rate electricity.

I lived in a house with night time storage heaters - expensive to run, within 30 minutes of turning the power off their are ice cold. They also generate heat ony a foot or so from the radiator.

Never again.

Actually, all my friends have put log burners into their homes in the past year and these are very efficient. I think big houses have had their day in the UK due to the maintenance upkeep and the heating costs. In fact, I wish I had figured this out 18 months ago as I have been looking at largish houses but now am ruling them out - too late, as I had missed out on some cracking small houses that I could have bought much cheaper.

The Gower is full of large houses for sale - many of them are second home/holiday home owners desperate to sell but lots are also locals who can no longer afford the oil heating costs - most of the Gower is oil central heating. I heard lots of people were shocked by their oil bills in the past year, stories also of people coming home and finding their oil nicked.

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Was told yesterday by someone that from 2016 the building rules will change to mean any new builds have to be carbon neutral

I always wondered what that meant, but I am pretty sure it's not that the existence of the house makes no difference to how much carbon dioxide is in the atmosphere.

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I lived in a house with night time storage heaters - expensive to run, within 30 minutes of turning the power off their are ice cold. They also generate heat ony a foot or so from the radiator.

Never again.

Actually, all my friends have put log burners into their homes in the past year and these are very efficient. I think big houses have had their day in the UK due to the maintenance upkeep and the heating costs. In fact, I wish I had figured this out 18 months ago as I have been looking at largish houses but now am ruling them out - too late, as I had missed out on some cracking small houses that I could have bought much cheaper.

The Gower is full of large houses for sale - many of them are second home/holiday home owners desperate to sell but lots are also locals who can no longer afford the oil heating costs - most of the Gower is oil central heating. I heard lots of people were shocked by their oil bills in the past year, stories also of people coming home and finding their oil nicked.

I thought the Gower had a practically tropical climate?!

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I lived in a house with night time storage heaters - expensive to run, within 30 minutes of turning the power off their are ice cold. They also generate heat ony a foot or so from the radiator.

Never again.

Actually, all my friends have put log burners into their homes in the past year and these are very efficient. I think big houses have had their day in the UK due to the maintenance upkeep and the heating costs. In fact, I wish I had figured this out 18 months ago as I have been looking at largish houses but now am ruling them out - too late, as I had missed out on some cracking small houses that I could have bought much cheaper.

The Gower is full of large houses for sale - many of them are second home/holiday home owners desperate to sell but lots are also locals who can no longer afford the oil heating costs - most of the Gower is oil central heating. I heard lots of people were shocked by their oil bills in the past year, stories also of people coming home and finding their oil nicked.

Watching Bruce Parry's Arctic last year. In Northern Russia they gather moss in the Autumn to insulate their homes. One central fire during the winter and apparently toasty.

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Alternatively, storage heating is an option, using cheap night electricity.

Er - and when everyone does it ? The cheap night electricity becomes the peak night electricity. :rolleyes:

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I lived in a house with night time storage heaters - expensive to run, within 30 minutes of turning the power off their are ice cold. They also generate heat ony a foot or so from the radiator.

I rented a remote holiday cottage up near Loch Ness that had storage heaters.

It was New Year and -17c at night. Without the solid fuel burning stove, we would have died of hypothermia.

The big flaw in storage heaters is you have to know the day before how much heat you are going need the next day. Even when turned to max, they ran out around 3 in the afternoon - just as it was getting cold.

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I rented a remote holiday cottage up near Loch Ness that had storage heaters.

It was New Year and -17c at night. Without the solid fuel burning stove, we would have died of hypothermia.

The big flaw in storage heaters is you have to know the day before how much heat you are going need the next day. Even when turned to max, they ran out around 3 in the afternoon - just as it was getting cold.

Ya big jessie. I still wear shorts when it is -5. My legs do look a little white though.

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Was told yesterday by someone that from 2016 the building rules will change to mean any new builds have to be carbon neutral

And for the most part it'll mean no gas or oil heating being put in...

Of course you can use gas and oil, you just have to offset the carbon produced by it to make the house carbon neutral.

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I lived in a house with night time storage heaters - expensive to run, within 30 minutes of turning the power off their are ice cold. They also generate heat ony a foot or so from the radiator.

Never again.

You're right, I would agree old storage heaters are terrible, but newer fan storage heaters are so much better. They have really high insulation levels which hold the heat for when you want it; delivered by a controllable fan (time/temperature) to draw the heat out. I reckon my bills are not far off gas now!

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There are a lot of electric boilers on the market, they tend to be more expensive than a gas boiler but you could replace a gas for electric boiler for approx £2k including labour.

That would be for a system boiler mind you, no one has made a electric combi yet, almost but not yet.

Don't understand why there's a market for electric boilers, surely the running costs are the same as portable electric heating? Plus you're heating the whole house - Must be very expensive to run.

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I'd be very reluctant to buy/rent a place without GCH. Is there a sensible way of heating a property with electricity? My perception is that doing so is expensive and inefficient at the moment.

One problem with gas is that people don't tend to look at the TOTAL cost. Cost per kwh may be lower, but when you factor in high installation costs, annual maintenance, emergency callouts and the fact that modern highly efficient boilers are twitchy beasts which only last 5-7 years (compared with the old inefficient stalwarts that spluttered on for up to 20 with only minimal attention and the odd spare part) electricity doesn't look so bad. Oil filled radiators don't go wrong, and if they do then a quick trip down B&Q and £40 and job sorted. As a back-up to off-peak night storage heating it can work.

Edited by cartimandua51

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One problem with gas is that people don't tend to look at the TOTAL cost. Cost per kwh may be lower, but when you factor in high installation costs, annual maintenance, emergency callouts and the fact that modern highly efficient boilers are twitchy beasts which only last 5-7 years (compared with the old inefficient stalwarts that spluttered on for up to 20 with only minimal attention and the odd spare part) electricity doesn't look so bad. Oil filled radiators don't go wrong, and if they do then a quick trip down B&Q and £40 and job sorted. As a back-up to off-peak night storage heating it can work.

Agree completely.

The comparisons I see nearly always just look at raw fuel costs not the total cost of ownership.

I think the the poor life expectancy of current gas boilers is the real killer for gas heating. It completely negates their supposed greater efficiency. From what I hear the chronic failure of these units is a real headache for the local Council housing department.

Edited by stormymonday_2011

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Was told yesterday by someone that from 2016 the building rules will change to mean any new builds have to be carbon neutral

That is the theory yes.

It can't possibly be achieved so will have to be dropped

tim

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I lived in a house with night time storage heaters - expensive to run, within 30 minutes of turning the power off their are ice cold.

But that would be because the house had crap insulation, not because the heating method is faulty.

tim

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  • 277 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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