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Peter Hun

Retail Solar Panels Down In Price By 50% In Three Years

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So is this being passed onto customers?

Just started doing a bit of investigation as to whether it might be worth having some panels as I have a big mofo south facing roof so any info is most welcome.

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When they are £1 per watt they will be fair value and viable IMO.

Then their are fair value and viable today -

$1.35 = 84p per watt.

http://www.affordable-solar.com/store/solar-panels-by-the-pallet/CSI-CS6X-290M-290W-Solar-Panel-pallet24

Just started doing a bit of investigation as to whether it might be worth having some panels as I have a big mofo south facing roof so any info is most welcome.

use this search

https://encrypted.google.com/search?q=solar+by+the+pallet

Edited by Peter Hun

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So is this being passed onto customers?

Just started doing a bit of investigation as to whether it might be worth having some panels as I have a big mofo south facing roof so any info is most welcome.

Had mine installed last Friday (took 3 days in all).

2.7kWp system on a due-south facing roof, currently doing about 20% better than the figures quoted (based on 4 full days, mind you...). Total cost £9k. If you want to use the same supplier (who I would recommend due to speed of response and good customer service) and live in the south west, PM me.. there is £100 each for a recommendation.

If you are going to do it, do it ASAP before the feed in tariffs are cut back or scrapped altogether - April or sooner. The feed in tariff gives you something like a 12% index-linked tax-free return for 25 years, so if you have the cash available it's a no-brainier.

Don't bother with the rent-a-roof schemes.

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The fact that solar is both increasing in efficiency and decreasing in price is a seriously good reason to not have carbon taxes is it not?

The market will naturally gravitate toward solar power when it becomes cheaper to use it than to use coal powered electricity , i don't think that point is far off.

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Had mine installed last Friday (took 3 days in all).

2.7kWp system on a due-south facing roof, currently doing about 20% better than the figures quoted (based on 4 full days, mind you...). Total cost £9k. If you want to use the same supplier (who I would recommend due to speed of response and good customer service) and live in the south west, PM me.. there is £100 each for a recommendation.

If you are going to do it, do it ASAP before the feed in tariffs are cut back or scrapped altogether - April or sooner. The feed in tariff gives you something like a 12% index-linked tax-free return for 25 years, so if you have the cash available it's a no-brainier.

Don't bother with the rent-a-roof schemes.

Have been thinking about this - am Central(ish) London (Zone 2) and with East/West facing roof... still worth looking into in your view, and did the company you get do London?

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It's $2.50+ per Watt at the moment according to that graph.

The fact that solar is both increasing in efficiency and decreasing in price is a seriously good reason to not have carbon taxes is it not?

The market will naturally gravitate toward solar power when it becomes cheaper to use it than to use coal powered electricity , i don't think that point is far off.

The viability price was always considered to be $1 per watt to compete against coal.

2.7kWp system on a due-south facing roof, currently doing about 20% better than the figures quoted (based on 4 full days, mind you...). Total cost £9k. If you want to use the same supplier (who I would recommend due to speed of response and good customer service) and live in the south west, PM me.. there is £100 each for a recommendation.

£100 ? Not surprised at that price - about £4.5k for panels and grid tie inverter, the rest is installation. The feed-in tariff probably makes it worthwhile but basically this is an example of the benefits going to installation companies. If you can install it yourself and certified it would be far cheaper.

It's $2.50+ per Watt at the moment according to that graph.

And $1.35 in the shop, where you can actually buy it. The chart isn't for sale.

Edited by Peter Hun

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Very interesting. I suspect that over the next 30 to 50 years when global warming is expected to start getting noticeably problematic the price/effectiveness may have improved a little more too...

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Isn't this graph showing Peak, which means what it generates in perfect conditions? Rather than an average for the whole year?

As far as I can see, yes. Should be average real world price per unit electricity.

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As far as I can see, yes. Should be average real world price per unit electricity.

Its the quoted maximum output of the module. There is a calculation to determine the time to pay back.

So for instance 84p= £840per KWatt.

Say 1KWatt is 10p, its going to take 8400 hours of maximum power to repay the investment.

Over 365 days it would require an average of 23hours strong sunshine per day

Over 3650 days (ten years) it would require an average of 2.3 hours equivalent sunshine per day. 840 hours per year

There is a world map telling you how much sunshine equivalent on average you get per year for where you are. I think the UK is around 1400 hours per year.

So 8400/1400= 6years.

This is just for the solar panels, the inverter is about 40p per watt on top, plus add on 100% for installation in the UK apparently.

Edited by Peter Hun

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Riggght... so why post the graph then, if it is so wrong?

It shows the trend. The inflation rate is 5% but the price of bread doesn't go up by exactly 5% does it?

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Very interesting. I suspect that over the next 30 to 50 years when global warming is expected to start getting noticeably problematic the price/effectiveness may have improved a little more too...

Unless global warming is going to cause the Suns output to get stronger - then I doubt it will make any difference ?

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What if next door decide to release some equity and do a loft conversion or extension putting shade on the thing, do you still get the subsidy or is it based on the amount of power you produce? Hopefully when I finally get a house the prices will be lower.

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The viability price was always considered to be $1 per watt to compete against coal.

£100 ? Not surprised at that price - about £4.5k for panels and grid tie inverter, the rest is installation. The feed-in tariff probably makes it worthwhile but basically this is an example of the benefits going to installation companies. If you can install it yourself and certified it would be far cheaper.

Given that installation was about 6 man days for people who actually had a clue what they were doing, I'd pass on the self-install bit!

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What if next door decide to release some equity and do a loft conversion or extension putting shade on the thing, do you still get the subsidy or is it based on the amount of power you produce? Hopefully when I finally get a house the prices will be lower.

You get (at the moment, for a new <4kw system):

43p per kWh produced, regardless of who uses it. (Feed in tariff)

3p for the half of this, that the power company presumes you export to the grid - unless you have a special meter to actually measure this. (Export tariff)

'free' electricity for however much you actually use. (This is what the 'free solar panel' companies are advertising).

So if it's shaded, you lose out.

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You get (at the moment, for a new <4kw system):

43p per kWh produced, regardless of who uses it. (Feed in tariff)

3p for the half of this, that the power company presumes you export to the grid - unless you have a special meter to actually measure this. (Export tariff)

'free' electricity for however much you actually use. (This is what the 'free solar panel' companies are advertising).

So if it's shaded, you lose out.

What is the score if you move ? Does the 25 year agreement go with you or stay with the house ? And what about if a roof needs redone - would this add a lot to the cost ? I assume it would ?

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If they do reduce or remove the tariff next spring it'd be typical. As soon as anything becomes sensible or worthwhile it gets stopped.

I was going to get solar panels when I eventually buy a house but only if it's worthwhile. Doesn't seem likely now.

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Unless global warming is going to cause the Suns output to get stronger - then I doubt it will make any difference ?

GW cause more heat and moisture in the air which reduces the effectiveness of solar panels.

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Given that installation was about 6 man days for people who actually had a clue what they were doing, I'd pass on the self-install bit!

Maybe, but £4500/6 is £750 per day. Nice work for a electrician, although you would be a bit over qualified.

Edited by Peter Hun

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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