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Uk University Applicants Drop By 12% Before Tuition Fee Rise

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/oct/24/university-applicants-drop-tuition-fees

The number of UK-born university applicants for next September – when fees rise to up to £9,000 a year – has plummeted by almost 12%, official figures show.

The first set of statistics on applications to university next year, published by the Universities and Colleges and Admissions Service (Ucas), reveal that 52,321 applicants have applied from within the UK, compared with 59,413 this time last year.

The figures have led union leaders to brand the decision to almost treble fees "a disaster".

The statistics are an early indication of the total number of applications, but only show the number received by universities by 15 October. This is the deadline for Oxford, Cambridge and courses in medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine.

Candidates for other universities have until 15 January to apply, but there has been a trend for early submissions and these figures include early applications for other universities and courses too.

The number of applicants from within and outside the UK combined has fallen by 9% to 69,724, from 76,612 this time last year.

The fat lady hasn't sung yet but it appears the education bubble is about burst, can those Universities already on the brink survive a fall in number?

A minimum debt of £27k to stay off the unemployment queue is no bargain. As this depression gets worst the figures in higher education will start to fall even more.

Still maybe once EU have fixed it all we can get back to normal....

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Last year was a spike, for the obvious reason. This figure is roughly in line with those from the mid to late '00s.

So the books should balance then with this intake, as surely budget projections will be based on mid to late '00s figures.

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The fat lady hasn't sung yet but it appears the education bubble is about burst, can those Universities already on the brink survive a fall in number?

A minimum debt of £27k to stay off the unemployment queue is no bargain. As this depression gets worst the figures in higher education will start to fall even more.

Still maybe once EU have fixed it all we can get back to normal....

University tuition fees were a key part of the plan by the boomers to transfer the debts they ran up to their children and grandchildren, along with thing like retirement ages coming up behind them to block future access.

Remember - a large part of that £27k will go towards paying the Unis huge outstanding pension liabilities, left from when the boomers had free education.

For some reason, the boomers never expected people to simple NOT GO to university when the fees went up.

A plan B is needed... some way for force the young people who currently have no incentive to go to work into some form of employment so they start paying NI to help pay off these dabts. Time to drum up some hatred of the "scroungers" so we can force them into sub-minimum wages jobs with no prospects or stability.

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University tuition fees were a key part of the plan by the boomers to transfer the debts they ran up to their children and grandchildren, along with thing like retirement ages coming up behind them to block future access.

Remember - a large part of that £27k will go towards paying the Unis huge outstanding pension liabilities, left from when the boomers had free education.

For some reason, the boomers never expected people to simple NOT GO to university when the fees went up.

A plan B is needed... some way for force the young people who currently have no incentive to go to work into some form of employment so they start paying NI to help pay off these dabts. Time to drum up some hatred of the "scroungers" so we can force them into sub-minimum wages jobs with no prospects or stability.

Oh come off it, I'm all for a bit of boomer-bashing (despite being one myself - just), but this argument doesn't stack up. There never was any considered plan by the boomers to transfer debt, even if it might have happened like that. Most boomers did not go to University, and they weren't at Uni when the large increases in numbers occurred. And in the early years of the current fees system it will actually cost the Govt more than the old grant system because it will be the taxpayer paying the £9K per year in most cases. A high proportion of the students will never pay it back.

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I work in the construction industry. Universities are currently spending money like its going out of fashion - their ambitious building programmes have seen halls of residence, sports facilities, libraries, & theatres being tendered non-stop over the last few years (even now, they are still one of our key markets).

Another friend in construction has seen student accomodation rocket - becoming more and more high spec. Anyone who went to Uni 20 years ago would not recognise the current student house / flat. Gone are the drafty rooms and stained carpets and in come gyms, housekeeping / laundry services, flatscreen satellite tvs.

Rents of £120 a week are not uncommon. £157 a week for a 1 apartment in Nottingham with Mansion Group...

Mansion Group

Throw in living expenses, tution fees, course materials, & travel etc, and this lifestyle would be unsustainable for most on a normal wage, let alone students.

The whole bubble is about to burst in spectacular fashion

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University tuition fees were a key part of the plan by the boomers to transfer the debts they ran up to their children and grandchildren, along with thing like retirement ages coming up behind them to block future access.

Remember - a large part of that £27k will go towards paying the Unis huge outstanding pension liabilities, left from when the boomers had free education.

For some reason, the boomers never expected people to simple NOT GO to university when the fees went up.

A plan B is needed... some way for force the young people who currently have no incentive to go to work into some form of employment so they start paying NI to help pay off these dabts. Time to drum up some hatred of the "scroungers" so we can force them into sub-minimum wages jobs with no prospects or stability.

Are all the boomers still here or shouldn't they all be at the Bilderburg conference?

Seriously, posts like this are just lame.

Still, great that Uni applications are down, so much wasted time being retrieved - now just have to find something useful to do with it.....

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Most boomers did not go to University

Quite! In them days it werent for the masses. But then I was never a fan of the drive to get everyone to go to uni in the first place.

But I do agree that it is astonishing that when I see MPs discussing this they just can't accept that it would put anyone off. Regardless of the rules around repayments it's clearly only going to have a negative impact on uptake.

I'm not big into socialism but certainly support free education. We all benefit from having an educated work force.

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Some anecdotal numbers I heard from a big sixth form college from near here.

Normal coaches full of sixth formers taken to a universities/higher education fair (where lots of unis have stands to advertise themselves) : Four

This year ; Two and half coaches

Normal rate of youngsters taking a gap year (about 10%)

The cohort that just finished A levels: 2% now on gap years.

This last number can almost account for the dip in this year's numbers so far applying to uni and the spike for last year.

iirc isn't the Ayotollah a uni admissions tutor? - I'd be interested in any first impressions of whether some uni courses are dipping more than others?

I would also anticipate a big drop for courses starting in 2014 as lots of youngsters bide their time to see if a new government (2015) reduces fees. - it could be big vote winner for all the parents of 18 year olds, and the 18 year olds themselves.

Y

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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