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Frank Hovis

Japanese Knotweed------merged threads

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As it's in the Mail they can't resist quoting property prices but definitely an off-topic subject. I see a fair bit of this stuff about so wonder why more people aren't affected, also puzzled that it's been around in this country since the C19th but I don't think I'd even heard of it ten years ago. Great shame for this chap, these are pictures you just don't want to be taking in your home:

article-2052337-0E74A88E00000578-707_468x527.jpg

article-2052337-0E74565700000578-773_468x394.jpg

If you discover the plant on your property these are some of the steps you should take to prevent further problems:

 Immediately create a 21ft exclusion zone around the suspect plant.

Do an initial spray with glyphosate-based weed killer.

Do not excavate or move soil from the exclusion zone without instruction from the local authority.

Cutting should be done with sharp secateurs or pull it out by hand to avoid dispersal of fragments.

Wash feet and clean shoes when leaving the contaminated area.

If you cut down knotweed, you can burn it on site or bury it – 16ft deep, covered with a root-barrier membrane and with inert topsoil – with permission from the Environment Agency. Material taken from the site must be disposed of at a licensed facility.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2052337/We-demolish-300k-home-rid-Japanese-knotweed.html

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JK is the daddy of all weeds. Big money to be made in finding an effective poison. Going nuclear seems to be the only option at present.

Terrorist weed muvver fu@ker......

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Sounds like a lot of effort. Is this stuff really worse than finding plutonium in your house? Sounds it.

If you get it not only do you have the problem of disposal but also the risk of being sued for shedloads if it spreads onto somebody else's land from yours. I've seen it at two locations locally and reported it to the council both times, you click its location onto a map. There are whole swathes of it the old mine working areas, not sure if it's because the ground is broken up or because its neglected, once you've seen it a few times you recognise it, even in winter where you get an area of apparently dead branches but with very little other vegetation.

If I found it anywhere near my house I'd be straight on the phone to the council, this is something that gets much worse if you ignore it.

On the plus side you can eat it and make jam out of it!

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Sounds like a lot of effort. Is this stuff really worse than finding plutonium in your house? Sounds it.

No, plutonium is still worse.

That ***** will ****** you up

Edited by anotherpointlessnamechange

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If you get it not only do you have the problem of disposal but also the risk of being sued for shedloads if it spreads onto somebody else's land from yours. I've seen it at two locations locally and reported it to the council both times, you click its location onto a map. There are whole swathes of it the old mine working areas, not sure if it's because the ground is broken up or because its neglected, once you've seen it a few times you recognise it, even in winter where you get an area of apparently dead branches but with very little other vegetation.

If I found it anywhere near my house I'd be straight on the phone to the council, this is something that gets much worse if you ignore it.

On the plus side you can eat it and make jam out of it!

My brother has found quite a bit of it about 100m from his house in France.

Nobody there seems particularly bothered, and he's just giving a French shrug.

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Loads in Swansea - numerous houses I know of that the banks have turned down mortgages on because of the knotweed nearby.

If I can be a*sed I will put together a google map of a new estate of 500K houses being built by one of the national builders in Swansea West, about 30 houses, which have a huge growth of knotweed on the other site of the boundary - I will be staggered if anyone every buys a house there or if a bank actually gives a mortgage on one.

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Surely as a potential buyer in the next year or so, placing some well disguised knot-weed substitute at the end of the road may force vendors into accepting our 'ludicrous' offers.

There are seriously legal penalties for transporting knotweed - there was a BBC programme on a few months ago about it.

Having said that, I live in the Sketty part of Swansea and, half a mile north of me, the north Sketty, Tycoch and Cocket Valley area of Swansea is full of it.

It destroyed a graveyard some years ago and I know of nuemrous houses that I have been interested in buying - but have not because of the silly asking price - have gone SSTC and then come back available due to the banks refusing to lend because of knotweed either directly on the property or within a mile and a half radius.

That mile and a half radius - if true - would mean that hundreds if not thousands of houses locally are unsellable. I can't see how that would be the case though.

A friend stupidly offered full asking price on a 280K property in Hendrefoilan (North Sketty) last year but the bank, Santander apparently, turned him down due to knotweed. The house is on for 250K now but, IMPO, it is 220K tops but that has not stopped it going SSTC about a month ago. It will be interesting to see if the bank gives a mortgage on it.

Then, about half a mile south of me is the old Emmanuel School which was choc full of knotweed. They are building houses on that site currently so I assume that have got rid of the knotweed but, cycling past this Summer, I stopped and looked at a mass of knotweed just yards from where the new houses now stand - how that works I don't know?

Mumbles is the same - various places around Mumbles are known for knotweed. I have overheard EAs talking about houses in various roads being turned down for mortgages because of the stuff.

I believe it is so bad in Swansea that Swansea is one of the trial sites for using new technologies to try and eradicate it. They released something into the air earlier this year which is apparently supposed to eat away at the roots of knotweed.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2052337/We-demolish-300k-home-rid-Japanese-knotweed.html

It's the scourge of the suburbs, feared by homeowners and gardeners.

Now a couple have been told their newbuild home must be demolished to rid it of an invasion of Japanese knotweed.

Matthew Jones and fiancee Sue Banks have seen the value of their four-bedroom house in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, almost wiped out – dropping from £305,000 to £50,000 – as a result of the damage.

Apparently the knotweed came from wasteland and they can't track down the owner who is legally responsible for it.

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There are seriously legal penalties for transporting knotweed - there was a BBC programme on a few months ago about it.

Having said that, I live in the Sketty part of Swansea and, half a mile north of me, the north Sketty, Tycoch and Cocket Valley area of Swansea is full of it.

It destroyed a graveyard some years ago and I know of nuemrous houses that I have been interested in buying - but have not because of the silly asking price - have gone SSTC and then come back available due to the banks refusing to lend because of knotweed either directly on the property or within a mile and a half radius.

That mile and a half radius - if true - would mean that hundreds if not thousands of houses locally are unsellable. I can't see how that would be the case though.

A friend stupidly offered full asking price on a 280K property in Hendrefoilan (North Sketty) last year but the bank, Santander apparently, turned him down due to knotweed. The house is on for 250K now but, IMPO, it is 220K tops but that has not stopped it going SSTC about a month ago. It will be interesting to see if the bank gives a mortgage on it.

Then, about half a mile south of me is the old Emmanuel School which was choc full of knotweed. They are building houses on that site currently so I assume that have got rid of the knotweed but, cycling past this Summer, I stopped and looked at a mass of knotweed just yards from where the new houses now stand - how that works I don't know?

Mumbles is the same - various places around Mumbles are known for knotweed. I have overheard EAs talking about houses in various roads being turned down for mortgages because of the stuff.

I believe it is so bad in Swansea that Swansea is one of the trial sites for using new technologies to try and eradicate it. They released something into the air earlier this year which is apparently supposed to eat away at the roots of knotweed.

I say you should take off and Nuke Swansea from orbit, its the only way to be sure

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I'm not a botanist but the pictures look more like bindweed than knotweed.

Definitely knotweed, I can recognise it at a distance these days when it's in leaf. Hate the stuff.

Bugger, didn't see this.

I've asked for a merge IRR, makes a change beating you with a DM story.

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I rather like this bit:

... unless the detached house is demolished and 10ft of soil removed from beneath the foundations it will be impossible to sell.

My guess is that the weed is a lot less of a problem than they suggest, and would be either ignored or dealt with for a fraction of the rebuild cost if it was not for the possibility of suing someone for damages?

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My Mum borders on the paranoid about this stuff, I'd almost say she has a phobia.

Recently she spotted it growing on some wasteland which they've recently started building on. She said they can expect BIG problems because they didn't appear to get rid of all of it.

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Apparently the knotweed came from wasteland and they can't track down the owner who is legally responsible for it.

I would say nature is responsible for it.......where there is blame there is a claim. ;)

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2052337/We-demolish-300k-home-rid-Japanese-knotweed.html

Apparently the knotweed came from wasteland and they can't track down the owner who is legally responsible for it.

How is it worth even £50,000?

Since the house is to be demolished the only value left is in the land. And that has knotweed on it! Worth £50K for a scrubby piece of infested land that is near enough other infested land to be reinfested again. I don't get it :blink:

Zero value or potentially negative, due to claims from others because of your infested land.

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Is it not the root system which causes all the problems? Would not the roots need a leafed plant to be able to flourish and spread? I am not a botanist either but have a basic understanding of photosynthesis.

Bit of an encumbrance but if this householder destroys any growth above ground as soon as he sees it couldn't he keep its spread in check?

The powers to be must be working on a solution to this and granted there will be a lot of money in it. I am even sure if they can develop the right weedkiller then it can be pressure injected into the earth under the structure.

If the householder can find no one to sue is his best course of action to try and keep in check as far as he can?

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Is it not the root system which causes all the problems? Would not the roots need a leafed plant to be able to flourish and spread? I am not a botanist either but have a basic understanding of photosynthesis.

The roots can go a long long way ... so can keep growing from a leaf area 7m away. (maybe further)

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Repeated applications of Glyphosate weedkiller will usually sort this stuff out. Minimum three spreayings per year over as many growing seasons as it takes, usually at least three.

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How do the Japanese deal with it?

Fungus and insects which do not exist in the UK. The fear is that any introduction of such would cause more problems than what they solve - i.e. the fungus or insects may blitz crops.

Worrying about the weeds coming through your house might pale when the potatoe crop is destroyed?

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