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Proposals For Rental Reform

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Looks like the main thing is increased security of tenure.

Also single ownership of blocks of apartments.

Plus greater tax incentives for landlords.

Press release is here:

http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/news/archives/2011/10/private_renting%20.aspx

Download the proposals here:

http://www2.lse.ac.uk/geographyAndEnvironment/research/london/events/londonDevWorkshops/newlondonenvironment/prslaunch/LAUNCHHome.aspx

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Personally i think no one person should have control over your housing needs.

IMHO all rental properties should be through a licenced agent, with strict guidance to follow that is the same accross the whole industry.

there should be a proper governing body with a structured compaints proceedure for failure to honour contract on both parts.

Longer tennancy agreents should be more common, with structured break clauses in them.

too many people are being rough rided by Landlords and Letting Agents in the UK, and some think they can get away with murder and stipulate their own rules that suite them.

yes there are bad tennants, and yes these should be delt with properly, but too many good tennants are given a bad name because of the bad ones.

Edit

regulation is not inherently associated with smaller, poorly operating private rented

sectors. Some of the larger private rented sectors, notably in Germany but also

in other European countries, have strong regulation in place with respect to rent

rises and security of tenure, while some of the smaller sectors are seen to work

badly;

so why dont we?

Edited by Monkey

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Panel 2 The benefits of long term rental arrangements

Peter Westerheide

If rental markets are to provide a good alternative to owner occupied housing, they

must be able to offer a stable, long term option. There are many reasons why households

may prefer private renting in addition to the flexibility it offers. The risk of high

mortgage debt, particularly for low and medium income earners without substantial

financial wealth in volatile housing markets, is one good reason for remaining in the

private rented sector. Another, especially for elderly and handicapped people is better

access to support and assistance from managers, neighbours and the community.

For these groups, security of tenure is of the utmost importance. From a tenants’

point of view, unlimited tenancies combined with strong regulation against eviction

and prohibitive rent increases are necessary to give that guarantee. In Germany

these conditions exist: contracts for residential leases are usually unlimited; the

notice period increases with the length of residency; tenants may only be evicted if

they have not fulfilled their contractual obligation – even if the landlord wants to use

the property himself unless there is an urgent need; rent increases are limited and it

is simply not possible to evict a tenant in order to get another one who pays a higher

rent.

This make so much sence

This level of regulation at first glance may seem unattractive to investors and there

are some tenants who exploit their protected position to the disadvantage of landlords.

But it offers a large number of benefits. The security of tenure attracts long

term tenants who pay their rents reliably, treat the landlord’s property responsibly and

care about their neighbourhood. It is the role of legislation and its implementation to

maintain a balance between necessary regulation and tenant protection on the one

hand and security for investors on the other.

Peter Westerheide is senior researcher, Centre for European Economic Research,

Mannheim

people who expect to stay in a place a long time, sometimes try to inegrate in the local community better or at all.

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Yes, it's all very sensible.

But it's from the LSE. So how much chance have these proposals of being implemented by a Government controlled by the Conservative Party?

1) The LSE is anathema to the Conservatives.

2) The Conservatives, as I never tire of explaining, are the guardians and champions of private property owners.

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Yes, it's all very sensible.

But it's from the LSE. So how much chance have these proposals of being implemented by a Government controlled by the Conservative Party?

1) The LSE is anathema to the Conservatives.

2) The Conservatives, as I never tire of explaining, are the guardians and champions of private property owners.

More so than Nu Labour ? it's a close call.

Proposals seems to make sense. Espcially the longer notice period the longer the tenancy. After 6 months you get the normal 3 motnhs - and every 6 months after that another month gets added on ? Would mean someone who has been in a place, paying rent, for 5 years would get 12 months notice. Is that too much or should there be a limit ?

Anyway all good in principle. Good idea about entire blocks as well. With all the unwanted new builds around you would think a 'cheeky offer' :D from a large investment company - with the intention of renting them out as an actual long term yield based business - would be attractive.

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I'd like to see a lot more contextual thinking and exploring around this issue because things aren't always want they seem.

For example, it is very common in one European country (can't remember which one it is, but I know it was a Northern European country) for a rental property, with a secured indefinate tenancy agreement, to come with a kitchen that consists of a tap poking out of the wall. Yes, the tenant is expected to install their own fitted kitchen in the property they rent; likewise, also carpet floors etc. You really do just rent a shell.

If rental reform in Britain moved us more towards this kind of situation, then it strikes me that would not help with one of the overwhelming knock-on problems with housing Britain has, which is that it is very difficult to move around a region or the country as work/life circumstances may require.

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More so than Nu Labour ? it's a close call.

Proposals seems to make sense. Espcially the longer notice period the longer the tenancy. After 6 months you get the normal 3 motnhs - and every 6 months after that another month gets added on ? Would mean someone who has been in a place, paying rent, for 5 years would get 12 months notice. Is that too much or should there be a limit ?

Anyway all good in principle. Good idea about entire blocks as well. With all the unwanted new builds around you would think a 'cheeky offer' :D from a large investment company - with the intention of renting them out as an actual long term yield based business - would be attractive.

Sounds good to me, assuming that the tenants can leave at 1 or 2 months notice regardless of the length of the tenancy. It is the interests of the tenants, commmunity and also the landlords to increase security.

The ridiculous 6 month AST does only the LL's any good.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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