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What Would Be Your Perfect House?

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One of the common complaints on the forum is that modern housing consists of a badly constructed slave box, perched on a grassy postage stamp with no parking space.

Which got me thinking.. imagine if we lived in a world where we actually built the type of housing we wanted (and the land was purchased at agricultural rates), what should developers build that people would like to live in?

My "dream" house would be as follows:

Garden, 50m² (preferably south facing)

Drive with ample room for 2 cars

Street parking for two more

3 or 4 Bedroom, master 20-25m², kids/guest 12-15m²

1 reception room 20-25m²

1 Kitchen 12-15m²

1 Study / sittingroom 12-15m²

2 Bathroom

Decent south facing conservatory.. properly designed into the house.

This is perhaps a bit lavish.. but still much smaller than the average American house which comes in at 210m²

The build cost would be around £120 -£150k excluding land (fun build cost calculator available here )

Say £50k for the land (again, purchased bulk as agricultural with utilities and street furniture supplied).

Total cost £200k for a house I would happily mortgage my life away for.

What would you have? or what would you consider bare minimum?

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Dream house?

30 acres, no neighbours for half a mile for a start.

Not too big/lavish - 4 bed farm house (trad style) would be fine.

Nearly there - only got 6 acres.

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My ideal house would be a detached 2 or 3 bedroom bungalow. Having now lived in 3 flats I rather enjoy the single storey living. :) Detached so I can play my music without worrying too much about the neighbours.

Nothing too large - don't want to spend too long having to clean it. :P Don't want anything too ornate or fussy in interior decor terms.

Should have a good sized front garden area for off road parking + a garage. I hope to get a collection of older cars one day. B) Back garden a reasonable size for entertaining, fairly low maintenance.

Separate kitchen from lounge. None of that fancy 'open plan' nonsense for me. Carpeted flooring in the hallway, lounge and bedrooms and tiled flooring in the bathroom and kitchen. ^_^

Bathroom must have a full sized bath in it - with either shower over bath or a separate shower cubicle.

Must have gas central heating with energy efficient combi boiler.

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Hey I can join in, I've thought about this waaaaaay too much.

Downstairs

Kitchen diner, bright, sizeable, probably leading onto a conservatory, plenty of worktop space.

Small utility room

Downstairs WC (possibly with a shower)

Plenty of space for shoes and coats in the hall

Good size lounge to seat 5 in comfort.

Upstairs

2 large doubles with plenty of storage - one ensuite.

Bathroom, not that fussed about separate shower cubicle but it would be a nice to have

Study / guest bedroom big enough to open out a sofa bed.

Outside

South facing non-overlooked garden

Large double garage with pitched roof secluded from road so the chavs can't see the motorbikes and tools in there.

Parking for 3 cars.

Location

30 mins from Waterloo other Central London station by train

Max 30 mins walk to pubs

Budget - up to £350K

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Not all that fussed by the house, I just want land/space.

A real fire, big garage and big/functional kitchen would be nice.

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Found it a few months ago after looking for five years since STRing in 2005.

Victorian detached. Lymington on the south coast. Walking distance to the town's amenities and to the marina. Sunny, private garden. Off street parking for three cars. Very large 80 sq metre garage/studio for conversion to a workshop. Great kitchen/diner with room for a sofa. Window seats galore in bay windows, lots of original features. Wood burning stoves in two rooms. Four bedrooms, three bathrooms.

Got it at about 20% under comparable properties for an ultra quick cash sale from a failing developer.

Was STRing worth it? Not really, as I sold a place in London which had continued to increase.

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Easy.

Old converted pub.

Leave the bar where it is.

Leave the kitchen where it is.

Half of the hall becomes a double garage

Ample bedrooms upstairs

Leave snooker

Leave dart board.

Ivy outside

Parking lot converted in garden with winter grape vine for grappa and icewine making.

Sorted.

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Victorian detached. Lymington on the south coast. Walking distance to the town's amenities and to the marina. Sunny, private garden. Off street parking for three cars. Very large 80 sq metre garage/studio for conversion to a workshop. Great kitchen/diner with room for a sofa. Window seats galore in bay windows, lots of original features. Wood burning stoves in two rooms. Four bedrooms, three bathrooms..

That sounds great, bit over bedroomed for me but I like the area down there a lot, if only I could drop my close to London criteria then I could start making silly offers all over the place :)

80sqm garage....mmmmmmmmmmmm......lathes...mills....motorbikes :)

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<snip>

This is perhaps a bit lavish.. but still much smaller than the average American house which comes in at 210m²

The build cost would be around £120 -£150k excluding land (fun build cost calculator available here )

Say £50k for the land (again, purchased bulk as agricultural with utilities and street furniture supplied).

Total cost £200k for a house I would happily mortgage my life away for.

What would you have? or what would you consider bare minimum?

I wouldn't say that is lavish at all.

Mrs the.ciscokid and I would like the house we are renting. Small village, large garden, large kitchen (big enough for a table that can sit 4 - 6 people - we spend all our time in there), double garage with utility, driveway, great sized loft, 3 bed (reasonable sizes). There is a pretty good living room, dining room, office/ 4th bed, and a conservatory as well. It is also very well constructed (because it was not built by modern day building development companies.

The only thing I would change is that we have oil heating. There is no gas in the village, so if I owned the place, I would invest in some alternative energy for the house.

The owner paid £500k for it in 2007, so if any of the others which haven't been looked after quite so well come up, we would probably be looking to pay around £350 - £400 for one. The chances of that are slim though.

The trick for us has been to gtfo of London, and find a location where there are jobs that require our skills. So far so good.

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As a family with two kids I would go for a 3 double bed house influenced by the work of Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, better known as Le Corbusier.

Big point is having a big garden for the kids to vent their energy.

Ideal place would be a street where as in the old times everyone knows all their neighbours in radius of half a mile. Street where children can roam free and have fun rather than sitting glued to the blue/white/black screen.

Garage/workshop to pursue hobbies, local shops around the corner similar to Tesco express but not Tesco, indipendents will do, thanks.

Close to station and Mway with good link to all directions. on edge of town/city where additional services/amenities exist.

Easy access to the nature: woods, hills, rivers...

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Large warehouse style top floor flat in sympathetically converted warehouse/old office in Hoxton/Shoreditch, or a small period house near Highgate village.

I think a kilo of gold should do it in a couple of years!

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Converted farm house, Small holding, North Yorkshire

Near towns with pubs/shops etc.

Strategically placed pillboxes with machine guns to ward off rustlers/riff raff.

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Small 2-3 bedroom, passivhaus standard, decent sized workshop outside, 10-15 acres of land. Current plans will have us in that place approx 10 years from now - hopefully we'll still be fit enough to enjoy it!

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I'd settle for the one we live in.

Within walking distance of a village that is within cycling distance of a town with London-linked rail line. Detached, 1 acre. Ample interior space (inc kitchen with seating for 10; separate dining room). Woodburning stoves. Walking distance of beach.

However, not sure what will happen when the children leave home. On the one hand, it seems sensible to retain their childhood home. On the other, it feels morally wrong to live somewhere which will be far bigger than we can use.

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To me a house has four walls, what matters more is the suroundings, the noise and air quality around , the community it sits in, the local facilities such as a post office, local shops, bus and train services, the wildlife the work.....it is the people that live there that make a place worth living in, and their pride and values in what they have, their qualities, skills and experiences that they share with all those who wish to do likewise.....everyone has something to offer. ;)

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I would like a huge palace in the centre of London.

And it would be pleasing if one didn't have to pay for it oneself. Maybe the plebs can pay for it. They can also worship at my feet into the bargain.

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Parking lot converted in garden with winter grape vine for grappa and icewine making.

A man after my own heart.. the only reason I'd love a south facing conservatory would be to use it as a pseudo greenhouse to grown vines and fruit trees that otherwise wouldn't agree with the climate.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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