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We'll Only Treat Your 'minor' Ailments If You Pay, Say Nhs Gps

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2045391/Well-treat-minor-ailments-pay-say-NHS-GPs.html

Patients expecting minor operations on the NHS have been told by their doctors they will now only be treated if they pay.

GPs have sent out letters to those on waiting lists telling the procedures are 'no longer paid for by the NHS' but that they have 'options' as a private patient.

Thirty patients waiting for minor skin surgery were told they may have to pay up to £250 for their treatment.

......

But the Haxby Group Practice in North Yorkshire, which sent the letters, denies any wrong doing, insisting that the private option was a pragmatic response to funding problems that could spread countrywide.

I presume these ops are more cosmetic than medical? Anyone got any more information, the article fails to mention what these ops are so I'm assuming that they may be for varicose veins etc... and it there's no interviews with the patients.

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It seems to me that stitching up cuts and setting bones is the very core of doctoring. Cheap to do and offers high benefits. Yet where is the glory in that? Every doctor wants to sit behind an MRI scanner and operate laser scalpels whilst injecting million pound a shot potions.

Perhaps we should do the opposite. Treat the minor stuff. If you get some near impossible and hugely expensive problem, we should say "time to die".

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GP's wages doubled under Labour. It appears that was not enough..........

GPs could more than double their income to £300,000 a year under health secretary Andrew Lansley's plans for the NHS, according to an analysis for the Guardian – sparking calls from top doctors for the government to reverse controversial policies that would appear to reward physicians who ration care.

http://www.guardian....s-double-income

Edited by Milton

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But the Haxby Group Practice in North Yorkshire, which sent the letters, denies any wrong doing, insisting that the private option was a pragmatic response to funding problems that could spread countrywide.

And there it is. Be careful what you wish for.

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Glad how this is no surprise here - what did people think would happen now they manage their own budget.

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Perhaps we should do the opposite. Treat the minor stuff. If you get some near impossible and hugely expensive problem, we should say "time to die".

You could cut out some of the insane "customer pathway assessors, advisers and middle management bloat" and save enough money to treat everyone.

But I agree keeping seriously ill people alive for a bit longer is madness.

The cutoff is supposed to be 50k for a years extra quality life.

Perhaps give people 10k and tell them to enjoy their last few months is the cheaper option?

Should you say that when people get to 70 they don't get any expensive treatment?

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You could cut out some of the insane "customer pathway assessors, advisers and middle management bloat" and save enough money to treat everyone.

Exactly, the average public sector worker is not a nurse or a fireman, its a pen pusher whose job would not exist in the private sector.

The NHS resists reform for political reasons instead of patient care and providing better healthcare.

And ministers resist such reform for the sake of their own careers.

Edited by Milton

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Paid twice. Nice racket!

In other news teachers have announced they will be charging £250 per day extra for any parents who wish their children to attend lessons*

* Not really, it's just doctors who are thieving at this stage, but it'll come.

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I think they should charge patients £10 for not turning up for booked appointments, without previously cancelling them...too many do not treat our NHS with the respect it deserves...they treat it as their right & entitlement when it is not. ;)

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Perhaps we should do the opposite. Treat the minor stuff. If you get some near impossible and hugely expensive problem, we should say "time to die".

That works OK until you are the one with the problem.

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Exactly, the average public sector worker is not a nurse or a fireman, its a pen pusher whose job would not exist in the private sector.

The NHS resists reform for political reasons instead of patient care and providing better healthcare.

And ministers resist such reform for the sake of their own careers.

Not sure they resist reform for political reasons, perhaps they sometimes resist because those front-line people doing the work know the reform is half baked (see GP fundholders part 1). You imply the private sector is more efficient, but in the US for instance the process of healthcare is more inefficient and costs roughly double for the same service. It's all those pen-pushing insurance people and healthcare company intermediaries in the process, and hospitals doing as many procedures they can get away with. The private sector therefore has at least as many issues in delivery inefficiency as the state-based system.

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I think they should charge patients £10 for not turning up for booked appointments, without previously cancelling them...too many do not treat our NHS with the respect it deserves...they treat it as their right & entitlement when it is not. ;)

I've been reading a lot of real life doctors stories - GPs and A&E.

The GP reckons they are a bit overpaid and underworked.

The A&E Doc reckons the NHS is stuffed cos GPs work less and Nhs direct sends everyone to a&e.

We don't need choice. You should go to the nearest hospital to you. (That treats what you have if you have a diagnosis)

But all of these books make recommendations for saving the nhs tons of money.

Tony Copperfield who wrote "sick notes" says - don't fine people cos they'll turn up and it'll take away the spare time docs have to catch up on things.

There was 26 missed appointments last month at my GPs.

Edited by SarahBell

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I think they should charge patients £10 for not turning up for booked appointments, without previously cancelling them...too many do not treat our NHS with the respect it deserves...they treat it as their right & entitlement when it is not. ;)

Brilliant. As long as I also get paid £10 - if I turn up on time for an appointment - and have to wait more than 15 minutes - as I pay a huge amount in NI every month for this service.

Sign me up.

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Not sure they resist reform for political reasons, perhaps they sometimes resist because those front-line people doing the work know the reform is half baked (see GP fundholders part 1). You imply the private sector is more efficient, but in the US for instance the process of healthcare is more inefficient and costs roughly double for the same service. It's all those pen-pushing insurance people and healthcare company intermediaries in the process, and hospitals doing as many procedures they can get away with. The private sector therefore has at least as many issues in delivery inefficiency as the state-based system.

NHS Spending is three times what it was in '96, yet is the size 3 times greater or the service 3 times better?

No.

The government threw too much money at the NHS with no real investigation into how the money was being spent

The private sector play their role in this. They have made a fortune off the back of increased NHS drug spend.

A prime example of bad governance, and Labour's Neo Corporatist model.

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I work for the NHS. I don't work in a hospital. I never see patients, doctors, or nurses. I work in a building with about 300 other people who all sit at desks with computers. None of us have any medical knowledge, bar what we have picked up in the job.

I think the problem with todays NHS, and the ever increasing spend on it, is, as someone above put it, the conversion of the nhs to the working style of the private sector.

I work in a team of 12.

6 of them are 'senior managers'.

This structure is repeated throughout the 300 people in my building.

Personally speaking I don't think this is necessary, given only 2 of those managers manage people..

Anyway..we 'support' the hospitals in the local area. We are IT people, web designers, programmers, trainers, HR people, sales people, commissioners, purchasers, etc etc.

My concern is that if the NHS was set up differently, we might not even be necessary.

The government decide we now have to monitor a certain type of treatment or patient. In order to record and meet this target we need new software that will pull this data from the hospital admission system. This involves system designers, programmers, managers, directors, project managers, and all these people meet and plan to design a software solution to solve the problem. Remember all these people have to be managed too. Then when the software is designed it needs to 'sold' to the managers of the department, that this is the best way to meet the targets - they don't have to use it (its a free market) - so they have to attend presentations by internal sales people. They then have to see if they have the money in their budget to buy the software from the IT people. If they do, the software has to be installed throughout the hospital by IT people. Then the staff need to learn how to use it, so they are trained by IT trainers. The the software needs to be supported..Already maybe 50 people have an input into this system and its support..imagine how much money and resource this has taken up by now..no doubt runs into the millions

My point is, I don't know how the system worked before, but I'm pretty sure that 40 years ago there wasn't any need for all of us. I am about as far removed from patient care as you can get. The whole process I described above has a very small impact on the old lady dying of cancer in ward 5. But millions of pounds has been spent, and thousands of hours of employees time has been taken up. The way the NHS is designed and works these days means all the people and money in the paragraph above are required..

And lets not get started on pensions or PFI...................<_<:angry:

Edited by Milton

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]

Think how many more patients could be treated if NHS wages went back to pre-Labour levels in real terms.

Staff wages didn't get out of control, they simply rose in line with the cost of living, where-as everyones elses wages didn't. If you do a skilled or semi-skilled job that abosolutely HAS to be done and can't be outsourced abroad, then your wages will have risen broadly in line with inflation.

The problem is people fail to realise that you average persons wage vs cost of living has fallen dramitcally over the last 15 years. People have compensated for this by borrowing increasingly large amounts of money in order to try to have the same standard of living their parents enjoyed.

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Nice graph, can we have another one with demographics on it please?!

If you can find one, I'll read it.

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Guest eight

I think they should charge patients £10 for not turning up for booked appointments, without previously cancelling them...too many do not treat our NHS with the respect it deserves...they treat it as their right & entitlement when it is not. ;)

These no shows are a good thing - imagine how much longer over my appointment time (typically in my experience about 40 minutes) I would have to wait if they turned up?

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2045391/Well-treat-minor-ailments-pay-say-NHS-GPs.html

I presume these ops are more cosmetic than medical? Anyone got any more information, the article fails to mention what these ops are so I'm assuming that they may be for varicose veins etc... and it there's no interviews with the patients.

the article I read said ingrowing toenails - as far as I know this is something that needs to be treated, but the NHS is now saying sorry no money left. Ironically GPs got huge payrises recently, and now the NHS says it cannot afford to pay for treatment these same GPs say if you give us even more money we can treat you outside the NHS.

Edited by Saver

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So the advice is to save not spend to cover possible medical bills? Makes sense unless, of course, there is a demand problem in the economy.

This is why the 'austerity' strategy is self defeating- it alters the mass psychology of consumption upon which the economy depends.

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The miracle of living longer doesn't come cheap.

Im sure you are not suggesting that an aging population accounts for a threefold increase in NHS spending.

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Im sure you are not suggesting that an aging population accounts for a threefold increase in NHS spending.

Presumably inflation from 1996 accounts for, say 30-40% increase, and there are far more treatments done now due to the ageing population, new treatments, more expensive drugs, and much shorter waiting lists (many used to die waiting when 18-month waits for heart surgery were routine). So I can easily see that a doubling in spending may have been justified. There has been (and still is) profligacy, too much bureaucracy, and much of PFI a disgrace, but an insurance-based system is still less efficient in most cases.

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There was a really good programe on the radio the other day about NHS procurement....the money that is wasted by not buying in bulk and by departments not sharing resources...some amazing statistics re latex gloves for example how many different types they used from countless different sources...with a very wide variation of prices for an almost identical product....and it went on and on.....there is so much that can be saved without the loss of even one job. ;)

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  • 334 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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