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Hungry But Not Homeless: Demand For Food Handouts Rises By 20% As 'ordinary' People And Families Fall Into Poverty

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2044286/UK-food-handout-demand-rises-20-ordinary-people-families-fall-poverty.html

Britain has seen a sharp rise in the number of people requesting food handouts as 'ordinary' working people and families fall on hard times.

In the past year alone FareShare, which redistributes surplus food from major manufacturers and supermarkets to social care charities, has seen a 20 per cent rise in the number of people who can't afford to feed themselves - from 29,000 per day to 35,000 per day.

Food donations are ordinarily taken up by the homeless and destitute, but now FareShare and similar organisations are seeing families and working people who have lost jobs benefiting from the service.

I'm quite surprised the figure is as low as this.

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I'm surprised people need to access this.

I get the lowest rate JSA of £53.45/week, and I can get by on egg sarnies.

The only people getting less, will be under 25s on JSA who have deductions for crisis loans, people facing benefit sanctions, people not claiming (why wouldn't they claim from the state they are forced to support through their taxes? - then go and accept food parcels). A2 nationals, illegal immigrants.

I'd quite like to know the income of people claiming these food parcels. Perhaps I should claim one, and then spend my dole in the pub! If the food is food which would otherwise be wasted, it'd be a win-win for all situation.

My local supermarket has a 18ft razor fence surrounding the bins, and they throw some right goodies away! I'd be in them bins like a shot if it wasn't for that fence!

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I'm surprised people need to access this.

I get the lowest rate JSA of £53.45/week, and I can get by on egg sarnies.

The only people getting less, will be under 25s on JSA who have deductions for crisis loans, people facing benefit sanctions, people not claiming (why wouldn't they claim from the state they are forced to support through their taxes? - then go and accept food parcels). A2 nationals, illegal immigrants.

I'd quite like to know the income of people claiming these food parcels. Perhaps I should claim one, and then spend my dole in the pub! If the food is food which would otherwise be wasted, it'd be a win-win for all situation.

My local supermarket has a 18ft razor fence surrounding the bins, and they throw some right goodies away! I'd be in them bins like a shot if it wasn't for that fence!

Yep the money probably gets diverted elsewhere and after the pub you are looking at cigs and the lotto and in the case of some of the higher earners debt repayments.

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The only people getting less, will be under 25s on JSA who have deductions for crisis loans, people facing benefit sanctions, people not claiming (why wouldn't they claim from the state they are forced to support through their taxes? - then go and accept food parcels). A2 nationals, illegal immigrants.

You'd be surprised. There's also people who try to claim but get turned down, as happens if you're not sitting around doing nothing (other than job applications), but instead trying hard to better yourself, or even just do voluntary work.

They hit me with that in 2002/2003. Result: I had a small earned income, about one third of what I'd've got on benefits once you include housing benefit. The only food I was buying more than once-in-a-blue-moon back then was value-line pasta and pulses, making for a week's adequate nourishment at about £1.15 (more like £2 at today's prices since pasta has gone up). Nature's bounty added a little variety/interest: I was picking blackberries right into late November!

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You'd be surprised. There's also people who try to claim but get turned down, as happens if you're not sitting around doing nothing (other than job applications), but instead trying hard to better yourself, or even just do voluntary work.

They hit me with that in 2002/2003. Result: I had a small earned income, about one third of what I'd've got on benefits once you include housing benefit. The only food I was buying more than once-in-a-blue-moon back then was value-line pasta and pulses, making for a week's adequate nourishment at about £1.15 (more like £2 at today's prices since pasta has gone up). Nature's bounty added a little variety/interest: I was picking blackberries right into late November!

How can you get turned down?

Your income is topped up to the rate of dole, unless you have £6k+ in the bank.

Maybe you applied for the wrong benefit? Contribution based rather than income based?

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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