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Spiders And Drowsey Wasps


Harry Sacks

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The weirdest thing happened a few weeks ago. Caught a small spider in my bedroom, took it to the window and flicked it off my hand. It just hung there on a strand of web and started to climb back up, I flicked my hand again and moved my hand back inside the bedroom, but the spider remained outside and kept climbing! It climbed another 5 feet above my head towards a telephone wire and then fell. How did it do that? Either it found an old web hanging down, although I couldn't see one, or it fired out a web Spiderman style. Amazing creatures.

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The cat was toying with a large spider, before eating it on a window ledge. Somehow the spider not liking its chances, it managed to scuttle under the cat and jump off the ledge, freefall style. This left the cat scatching its head for a few minutes, wondering where the spider went. It was dead funny to see.

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Not that keen on spiders personally, but the cat tends to deal with them pretty well so these days we don't tend to see them.

Never seen the fuss with wasps, people go crazy when one comes near them which I have never really understood.

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Not that keen on spiders personally, but the cat tends to deal with them pretty well so these days we don't tend to see them.

Never seen the fuss with wasps, people go crazy when one comes near them which I have never really understood.

I think you would be more wary of them if you were highly allergic to their sting. ;)

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Most of the smaller UK spiders are OK. Picking the large ones up is a bit silly as they can bite and the bite can break the skin. I don't think it is poisonous but can get infected and is unpleasant. Capture them and get rid of them, or shoo them away.

We also have some visitors who need to be respected :

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-15182118

Don't pick these things up.

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Most of the smaller UK spiders are OK. Picking the large ones up is a bit silly as they can bite and the bite can break the skin. I don't think it is poisonous but can get infected and is unpleasant. Capture them and get rid of them, or shoo them away.

We also have some visitors who need to be respected :

http://www.bbc.co.uk...-herts-15182118

Don't pick these things up.

Aye those big ones have some set of fangs on them. Dont see why they would bite though if you were gentle about it. Not tried yet mind.

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I think you would be more wary of them if you were highly allergic to their sting. ;)

Yep I'm sure I would be, but most people are not allergic to wasp stings and unless they can produce an EpiPen they are in my eyes a big girls blouse.

Just out of interest this is how serious the problem is...

On average four Bee or Wasp sting anaphylaxis deaths are reported per year in the UK and the average age being 50 years (BSACI)

As opposed to....

3 Brits die each year testing if a 9v battery works on their tongue.

and while not deadly I found this rather amusing.

5 Brits were injured last year in accidents involving out of control Scalextric cars.
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Yep I'm sure I would be, but most people are not allergic to wasp stings and unless they can produce an EpiPen they are in my eyes a big girls blouse.

Just out of interest this is how serious the problem is...

Yes, an EpiPen is very useful, it should be carried at all times when the risk of being bitten is high...most don't die even though the swelling is very quick, bad and painful, the reaction gets worse over time, the body builds up more histamines each time that react to the poison in the sting and it is not only wasp sings...the thing to be careful is not to get stung in the mouth or anywhere that can block airwaves. ;)

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Yep I'm sure I would be, but most people are not allergic to wasp stings and unless they can produce an EpiPen they are in my eyes a big girls blouse.

Do EpiPens also help if you are attacked by a Moth ;)

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Aye those big ones have some set of fangs on them. Dont see why they would bite though if you were gentle about it. Not tried yet mind.

They bite because millions of years of evolution has trained them that anything that they encounter that moves and is bigger than them will normally try to eat them. This includes but isn't limited to birds, rodents, cats etc. They only have 2 defence mechanisms, biting and running away. If they can't run away they will try and bite.

By handling them gently you have a chance of fooling them that they are not encountering a predator, but of course that's a gamble. Some large spiders can be handled easily and don't seem to mind. They will only bite if extremely provoked and make good pets. Others will always be aggressive, no matter how careful you are with them. I think it depends on the species.

I've been bitten by a UK one before. It didn't hurt that much. Given the fact though that it has probably last put its fangs in something pretty yucky it is probably best avoided. Like most animals it is best respected by being left alone. You do it no favours by picking it up. Appreciating it from a distance is probably the best thing to do if you are concerned for its welfare.

Edit, actually I've seen them try and play dead as well.

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They bite because millions of years of evolution has trained them that anything that they encounter that moves and is bigger than them will normally try to eat them. This includes but isn't limited to birds, rodents, cats etc. They only have 2 defence mechanisms, biting and running away. If they can't run away they will try and bite.

By handling them gently you have a chance of fooling them that they are not encountering a predator, but of course that's a gamble. Some large spiders can be handled easily and don't seem to mind. They will only bite if extremely provoked and make good pets. Others will always be aggressive, no matter how careful you are with them. I think it depends on the species.

I've been bitten by a UK one before. It didn't hurt that much. Given the fact though that it has probably last put its fangs in something pretty yucky it is probably best avoided. Like most animals it is best respected by being left alone. You do it no favours by picking it up. Appreciating it from a distance is probably the best thing to do if you are concerned for its welfare.

Edit, actually I've seen them try and play dead as well.

I am thinking more of picking up as a way to get past the fear for many. I think more harm is done by that - than picking up a few of them and having the potential of a small probably minor bite.

Living your whole life in fear of something living in your house that can do you close to no harm ? That actually seems like a pretty serious psychological problem. If picking up a few of them sorts you out then I reckon it is worth more than the small risk of a tiny wee bite.

Still not had one of the big boys myself yet. :o:)

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They bite because millions of years of evolution has trained them that anything that they encounter that moves and is bigger than them will normally try to eat them. This includes but isn't limited to birds, rodents, cats etc. They only have 2 defence mechanisms, biting and running away. If they can't run away they will try and bite.

By handling them gently you have a chance of fooling them that they are not encountering a predator, but of course that's a gamble. Some large spiders can be handled easily and don't seem to mind. They will only bite if extremely provoked and make good pets. Others will always be aggressive, no matter how careful you are with them. I think it depends on the species.

Why handle them at all? Stick a cup or a glass over them, slide a piece of paper or card underneath, eject via window or door.

QED.

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I am thinking more of picking up as a way to get past the fear for many. I think more harm is done by that - than picking up a few of them and having the potential of a small probably minor bite.

Living your whole life in fear of something living in your house that can do you close to no harm ? That actually seems like a pretty serious psychological problem. If picking up a few of them sorts you out then I reckon it is worth more than the small risk of a tiny wee bite.

Still not had one of the big boys myself yet. :o:)

As I said, it probably won't hurt you.

On the other hand it might hurt it, especially if your response to being bitten is squashing it. Personally I don't care for spiders much and tend to leave them alone unless they get in my way, in which case I try to remove them without harm if at all possible.

I think if I was scared of them I would go somewhere where I could handle a big one that was used to being handled. Maybe a zoo or something like that. When I was a kid I held a tarantula, but I doubt whether they let kids do that any more.

Despite the fact I don't like them much they are amazing animals. It's great to see a massive one walking across the floor.

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As I said, it probably won't hurt you.

On the other hand it might hurt it, especially if your response to being bitten is squashing it. Personally I don't care for spiders much and tend to leave them alone unless they get in my way, in which case I try to remove them without harm if at all possible.

I think if I was scared of them I would go somewhere where I could handle a big one that was used to being handled. Maybe a zoo or something like that. When I was a kid I held a tarantula, but I doubt whether they let kids do that any more.

Despite the fact I don't like them much they are amazing animals. It's great to see a massive one walking across the floor.

Indeed - I don't want to hurt the wee things. Hate the way people just stand on them willy nilly.

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Do you think they really made scissors that big in the 50's or did they possess some ancient wisdom that allowed them to shrink the man ?

Also I don't understand the "one of us has to die bit". Seemed to me like the spider was happy minding it's own business until he started throwing rocks at it. I suppose it makes a more interesting film than, "ooooh there's a big spider, I've going to avoid fighting that and getting myself bitten/being covered in spider blood and go off down the micro brewery instead".

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Some time ago, I woke up in the middle of the night in quite a state, telling my wife there was something in the bed. By the time we gathered our wits and switched the light on there was nothing to see. The following day I noticed a mark on my leg or more precisely, two tiny puncture marks about 5mm apart that I didn't have the previous day. I'm sure it was a spider bite and it was enough to wake me from my sleep. Must have been one hell of a spider but I was handling one of the right sort of size at home yesterday. I don't like spiders but I was trying to show my toddler they weren't scary. Not that I enjoy lying to him either.

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