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Supermarkets Issuing Recycled Carrier Bags Now?

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I ask because today I got 3 carrier bags from the automatic checkout - in one of the store's orange bags when I took my groceries out I found an old paper hanky, in another a receipt for shopping from another branch of the store some miles away on 14 Sept when I was still abroad, and I also saw the bag had a tear.

I had been scratching my head as to how the tissue got in there, now it seems the answer is they recycle the bags and put them on the racks there where they look previously unused but have been in fact

I do often bring a strong carrier to reuse but on this occasion it tore, I am not against recycling but I don't like finding litter in with my groceries, it's potentially not terribly hygienic especially if packing open breads like baguettes that come in a sleeve

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Good idea I say.....I like to use those large blue Swedish store bags, one or two of them put into the trolly after unloading groceries onto the belt for scanning....you can then lift them straight into the boot of the car, then inside when you get home...they are strong and the handles don't cut into your hands...best of all they are reusable (good for laundry as well). ;)

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Good idea I say.....I like to use those large blue Swedish store bags, one or two of them put into the trolly after unloading groceries onto the belt for scanning....you can then lift them straight into the boot of the car, then inside when you get home...they are strong and the handles don't cut into your hands...best of all they are reusable (good for laundry as well). ;)

A lot of people reuse the IKEA ones, here and abroad.

I am talking about the ordinary orange carrier bags - I do not think it is a good idea that a supermarket issues them as if they were fresh, clean and new bags. Tears lead to shopping falling out, someone else's discarded paper tissues although possibly dried out are a yuck to find in with your shopping

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A lot of people reuse the IKEA ones, here and abroad.

I am talking about the ordinary orange carrier bags - I do not think it is a good idea that a supermarket issues them as if they were fresh, clean and new bags. Tears lead to shopping falling out, someone else's discarded paper tissues although possibly dried out are a yuck to find in with your shopping

Take your own plastic bags with you shopping then...check them out first to see that they are clean, have no old till receipts, dirty tissues or tears in them.....when you have unpacked your shopping at home put the bags back in the car then you won't have to remember next time you go on a big shop they will be there waiting for you. ;)

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Take your own plastic bags with you shopping then...check them out first to see that they are clean, have no old till receipts, dirty tissues or tears in them.....when you have unpacked your shopping at home put the bags back in the car then you won't have to remember next time you go on a big shop they will be there waiting for you. ;)

As I said - I did take a large bag with me, it tore so I had to use theirs, one of my large strong bags can take 3 of what their bags can take. Try to read what I post eh ;)

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Most of the new ones are less than an atom thick so I end up using far more of them because they just can't take any load.

Yes they tear all too easily - more often than not the strongest bags in my experience of the big supermarkets seems to be Lidl, Morrisons (also the largest, I reuse theirs loads of times) followed by Asda, then Sainsburys, then Tesco.

I do not like the unpleasant surprise of thinking I am getting a new and likely to be clean carrier bag, only to find evidence someone has used it before - if they keep doing this I will be forced to double bag my bread and anything else which cannot be washed and I will throw my dummy out of the pram on this as it is just yuck

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As I said - I did take a large bag with me, it tore so I had to use theirs, one of my large strong bags can take 3 of what their bags can take. Try to read what I post eh ;)

The best thing is to take some spare strong ones that can be reused....they make them weak, thin and flimsy ones because it is cheaper and because most people don't bother to recycle them when they get home they either bin them or use them as bin liners...these bags take around 100 years or more to break down in land fill, we are using thousands of the things everyday. ;)

edit: they are charging 5p each from today in welsh stores....so it is pay up, bring your own or buy less.

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The best thing is to take some spare strong ones that can be reused....they make them weak, thin and flimsy ones because it is cheaper and because most people don't bother to recycle them when they get home they either bin them or use them as bin liners...these bags take around 100 years or more to break down in land fill, we are using thousands of the things everyday. ;)

edit: they are charging 5p each from today in welsh stores....so it is pay up, bring your own or buy less.

Apparently the bags can be recycled as with other plastics, the council's recycling info which co-mingles stuff says plastic bags on its list of recycled items, so presumably most plastic bags are the type that can be dealt with like that rather than x years in landfill

It's the new al-qaeda threat. Germ laden tissues in second hand carrier bags.

Gross.

Could it have been left by someone in front of you?

It was sort of flat like it had been in the bag awaiting a customer, so I doubt it

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About ten years ago some of the supermarkets were starting to use biodegradable bags.

A good idea which was both environmentally friendly and required no faffing about. What ever happened to that?

Linky

Tesco-degradable-carrier-bags320x320.jpg

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About ten years ago some of the supermarkets were starting to use biodegradable bags.

A good idea which was both environmentally friendly and required no faffing about. What ever happened to that?

Linky

Tesco-degradable-carrier-bags320x320.jpg

Carrefour (French chain) seem to, they have green ones, sort of soft plastic, they charge for them (they don't do any others except the proper thick shopping bags)

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My unique tracker so the DM can track the posters and copiers from the web link----> ixzz1ZcJT2dKo ;)

Ooo clever.

So they'll know how many times you link to them.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1257289/Tescos-green-bags-WORSE-environment.html

My unique tracker so the DM can track the posters and copiers from the web link----> ixzz1ZcJT2dKo ;)

Yep.. I realise that the "degradable" bags are often not particularly biodegradable in actual fact.. but I can't help feel that the basic idea has merit.

Instead of plastics, perhaps a kind of plant-fibre reinforced paper bag, or just research into properly degrading plastics. You could develop a material that when packaged in a protective argon environment doesn't degrade (for long life before being used at the super market.. you don't want to open a pack of bags and find mush), but then as soon as they are exposed to oxygen/co2 etc start to degrade over a 3 month period.. mush within a year.

I'm not a materials expert, but it sounds fairly feasible.

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Yep.. I realise that the "degradable" bags are often not particularly biodegradable in actual fact.. but I can't help feel that the basic idea has merit.

Great minds think alike:

EPSRC News Release

Wednesday 17 February 2010

Food packaging and other disposable plastic items could soon be composted at home along with organic waste thanks to a new sugar-based polymer.

The degradable polymer is made from sugars produced from the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, which comes from non-food crops such as fast-growing trees and grasses, or renewable biomass from agricultural or food waste.

It is being developed at Imperial College London by a team of Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council scientists led by Dr Charlotte Williams. The search for greener plastics, especially for single use items such as food packaging, is the subject of significant research worldwide. “It’s spurred on not only from an environmental perspective, but also for economic and supply reasons,” explains Dr Williams.

Around 7% of worldwide oil and gas resources are consumed in plastics manufacture, with worldwide production exceeding 150 million tons per year. Almost 99% of plastics are formed from fossil fuels.

“Our key breakthrough was in finding a way of using a non-food crop to form a polymer, as there are ethical issues around using food sources in this way,” said Williams. Current biorenewable* plastics use crops such as corn or sugar beet.

“For the plastic to be useful it had to be manufactured in large volumes, which was technically challenging. It took three-and-a-half years for us to hit a yield of around 80% in a low energy, low water use process,” explains Dr Williams.

Linky

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Nice little earner for Imperial College if they have the IP issues wrapped up. ;)

Yep.. no doubt certain foreign entities will do everything they can to rubbish it while they try to generate their own variant / protect their own interests (a la sucralose/Splenda), but for once I am happy as a tax payer to see my research money being well allocated :)

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Bunch of hopelessly flimsy bin bags left on the doorstep by the council yesterday. These ones have "no plastic bags" on them but as far as I know they don't want you putting them in any of the other collections of stupid bins they've dumped.

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Bunch of hopelessly flimsy bin bags left on the doorstep by the council yesterday. These ones have "no plastic bags" on them but as far as I know they don't want you putting them in any of the other collections of stupid bins they've dumped.

Are they for food waste?

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  • 333 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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