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Guest Charlie The Tramp

Don`t worry about it guys most are so deep and no danger. Just look along the East London Thames Gateway and Docklands at all those thousands of new homes and those which Prescott wants to build in the future.

My house is built on a wartime Battle of Britain RAF airfield which was pounded by the Luftwaffe.

They found a UXB here eight years ago. Oh great memories of my own army days.

In 1996, the UK Government released documents that pinpointed the exact location of hundreds of unexploded World War II bombs.

The positions of the bombs had been known since the war, when their impact sites were charted.

But they were either deemed too difficult to remove or considered to be low risk.

It is estimated there are more than 100 unexploded bombs throughout London and hundreds more across the UK.

Some are buried up to 30ft down and experts believe many bombs failed to explode because they didn't work properly.

According to the files, Kings College Hospital is sitting on a bomb.

And a 650-pupil south London comprehensive has a bomb close to its front gate.

Other cities in Europe face similar problems - particularly Berlin, where the allied onslaught was relentless.

I hope dogbox will read this.

Recent bomb findings

July 1998 - a 1,000lb German bomb was found in a hay field in Hertfordshire. A farm worker had seen the bomb land in a pit 57 years previously and covered it up when it failed to explode. He pinpointed its exact location for bomb disposal exports.

June 1998 - a WWII incendiary bomb was found lodged in the roof of a house in Longlevens, Gloucestershire, where it had landed in an air raid 58 years previously.

February 1998 - more than 1,000 residents of Chippenham, Wiltshire, were evacuated when an bomb disposal team was called in to detonate a 1,000lb WWII bomb known as a "fat boy".

October 1997 - two pensioners asked police to take away two live bombs from their garden shed as part of the firearms amnesty. Experts blew up the shells, which the owner had picked up after a WWII raid near his home in Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire.

July 1997 - a 300lb German bomb was discovered 10ft from the main production line of the Nelson oil field, 100 miles off the coast of Aberdeen. It was dragged clear and blown up. The site was shut for more than a month.

June 1997 - prototypes of the bouncing bomb used in the Dambusters raid were washed up on the a beach in Kent, 54 years after Barnes Wallis had overseen trials there.

April 1996 - an 11-year-old girl brought home a WWII hand grenade she found near her home in Manchester. Neighbours were evacuated for three hours while it was exploded.

October 1995 - more than 500 phosphorus bombs washed up on the west coast of Scotland. The nine-inch-long devices dating from World War II were believed to have been dumped at sea by the Ministry of Defence.

June 1995 - a shell that had lain undisturbed since US troops trained for the D-day landings exploded on Dartmoor, seriously wounding an eight-year-old girl. Her two brothers were also injured in the blast.

May 1995 - a man found an 18lb World War I shell near a rubbish dump in Livingston, West Lothian, and caused the local police station to be evacuated when he handed it in at reception. The bomb was later found to be safe.

June 1995 - live mortar shells were washed up on sand dunes 15 miles from the Queen's Sandringham estate.

May 1995 - a 10-year-old girl took a 3ft shell into school as part of VE day anniversary celebrations. Her headmaster called out bomb disposal experts who blew it up.

April 1995 - in what amounted to Britain's biggest peacetime bomb disposal operation, the 4,000 inhabitants of the Isle of Portland in Dorset were evacuated when a half-ton German bomb was discovered by quarrymen. The bomb, which had been under a football pitch for more than 50 years, was defused.

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Guest Bart of Darkness
Your jokes haven't exactly left me in pieces!

Looks like I've no chance of bringing the house down then!

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At 11am on Friday, a metal tail fin from a 1940s missile was found by an explosives ordnance engineer in a field next to Brookfields Farm and behind Oakington Immigration Reception Centre.

Do they tell the immigrants not to try to escape, there are unexploded bombs all around :ph34r:

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Wasn't there some sunk boat loaded with explosives in the Thames or something?

Anyone know about this?

/BTP

EDIT: I think this was what I heard something about - maybe it was mentioned on here?

UpYourB***WithACoconut

The link has nothing to do with coconuts - I've just always wanted to type that.

Edited by backtoparents

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:lol::lol::lol: Good one!

"Just heard they're renaming the town Bangalore "

One for the "Medal of Honour" fans there.

Edited by OLDFTB

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"experts believe many bombs failed to explode because they didn't work properly."

That's a Two-Ronnies news gag! :lol::lol:

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

That's a Two-Ronnies news gag! :lol::lol:

It`s a little more scientific than that. <_<

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...

April 1995 - in what amounted to Britain's biggest peacetime bomb disposal operation, the 4,000 inhabitants of the Isle of Portland in Dorset were evacuated when a half-ton German bomb was discovered by quarrymen. The bomb, which had been under a football pitch for more than 50 years, was defused.

Bomb disposal. Clearly a booming industry.

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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