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right_freds_dead

John Suttcliffe Farmer

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DOH did a report on the effects of the foot and mouth outbreak that happened a few years ago. a farmer called john suttcliffe has just been on the evening news. hes living on a nice farm, they got foot and mouth like all the others back then. now is claiming to be 'all upset' and probably wanting compo. he suffers from depression and panic attacks and nightmares ect. huh - dont we all.

what next ?

the guys living on a farm and hes complaining.

are these people made from candy floss or something ?

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Guest Bart of Darkness

I'm not defending farmers or Mr Sutcliffe but it's interesting that farmers do seem to suffer from very high levels of depression, with very high suicide rates.

A recent survey of over 500 farmers, conducted by Farmers weekly, found that one in three farmers feel depressed, while nearly two thirds said they feel more stressed than they did five years ago. Long hours, the BSE crisis, and the collapse of beef, lamb and milk prices have sent rural incomes plummeting. In 1992 over 14,000 people left the agricultural industry.[56]

Farmers and farm managers are the occupational group with the fourth highest risk of suicide in England and Wales. In the early 1980s, farmers were the occupational group with the second highest suicide rate, however, in the period between 1982 and 1992, this dropped from 2.05 times the average risk to 1.45 times. However, the actual figures are likely to be substantially higher than this as the percentage of 'open' or 'undetermined' deaths for farmers is very high, and there is substantial evidence that the majority of these are suicides.[57]

Women married to farmers have a suicide rate more than 20 per cent higher than the average. There is particular concern over the rise in the number of suicides in rural areas of Wales. The overall suicide rate in Wales is 14.6 per cent higher than in England. Male suicides account for 84 per cent of the suicides in Wales compared with 75 per cent generally.

http://www.mind.org.uk/Information/Factsheets/Suicide

Is it really that bad in the countryside? :blink:

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Is it really that bad in the countryside? :blink:

They brought it on themselves with their shoddy practices, given the way some of these clowns run things we're lucky only to have suffered BSE and Foot & Mouth, all paid for out of the public purse it should be noted.

Even when they're not f*cking up the countryside and environment with chemicals and feeding beef to cows we have to pay for them out of subsidy anyway.

If they were factories they would have been bulldozed long ago.

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I'm not defending farmers or Mr Sutcliffe but it's interesting that farmers do seem to suffer from very high levels of depression, with very high suicide rates.

http://www.mind.org.uk/Information/Factsheets/Suicide

Is it really that bad in the countryside? :blink:

They could always sell there land to create some even more BTLs.

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Guest struthitsruth

Is it really that bad in the countryside? :blink:

Farming is not just about living in the countryside. It's about running your own business, a business that requires a very high capital investment to get started, (Yes, possibly a farmer inherited the family farm and doesn't owe the bank for land, but the start-up costs even without land are daunting, which is why there are so few starting out in farming today) is beset by constantly changing bureaucratic legislation, regulation, auditing etc, (which applies to many businesses today, of course) and can be lonely, as there often isn't much contact with "customers" or clients on a day to day basis. When you travel in a rural area today, meaning these days, and at any season of the year, how many people can you see outside working at farming ??

The farm life that is imagined and created in the TV jollities such as Hugh FW or Jimmy's farm is rare and rarely financially viable as a business. The majority of farm businesses that are actually profitable today are large scale and intensive factory style operations. One worker to 250-300 cows, 1200-2000 sheep, 600-6000 arable acres. . . . . part time or imported eastern european help in busy periods.

Why are some of them still doing it ? - because giving up would leave them bankcrupt. The sale of all their business assets and land would not lift them out of debt. They would have to sell their home as well to raise enough to escape to the town or city to find new work.

Some are doing very well, it can't be denied. Look around the car park at any agricultural event and you can see the money splashed on the motors. But those aren't the ones contemplating suicide, are they ?

:(

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If you have ever worked on a livestock farm you will know what a $hit, alienating life it can be.

However, most farmers are useless bastards who think the tax payer should prop-up their crap money pit of a business because they can't be bothered to make a few changes, like get out of farming and into BTL (not really).

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Farming is not just about living in the countryside. It's about running your own business, a business that requires a very high capital investment to get started, (Yes, possibly a farmer inherited the family farm and doesn't owe the bank for land, but the start-up costs even without land are daunting, which is why there are so few starting out in farming today) is beset by constantly changing bureaucratic legislation, regulation, auditing etc, (which applies to many businesses today, of course) and can be lonely, as there often isn't much contact with "customers" or clients on a day to day basis. When you travel in a rural area today, meaning these days, and at any season of the year, how many people can you see outside working at farming ??

The farm life that is imagined and created in the TV jollities such as Hugh FW or Jimmy's farm is rare and rarely financially viable as a business. The majority of farm businesses that are actually profitable today are large scale and intensive factory style operations. One worker to 250-300 cows, 1200-2000 sheep, 600-6000 arable acres. . . . . part time or imported eastern european help in busy periods.

Why are some of them still doing it ? - because giving up would leave them bankcrupt. The sale of all their business assets and land would not lift them out of debt. They would have to sell their home as well to raise enough to escape to the town or city to find new work.

Some are doing very well, it can't be denied. Look around the car park at any agricultural event and you can see the money splashed on the motors. But those aren't the ones contemplating suicide, are they ?

:(

My wife's family were in dairy farming for generations. They had the sense to get out 10 years ago. They were far from broke when they did.

I know many farmers who treat their staff, the countryside, their neighbours and their animals like $hit not to mention dealing infected cattle to each other during F&M to get a bit of compo.

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  • 336 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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