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I am reading a really interesting book about cloud computing, something I knew next to nothing about until a few days ago. I had heard it mentioned and decided to investigate more.

Its all very exciting and scary. I am sure many of you are doing jobs that didn't exist ten or more years ago. What impact will the widespread adoption of cloud computing have on the economy, knocking on to jobs and of course, house prices? How many of you will have to retrain??

It would make an incredible difference if introduced into the public services. Really put a spanner in the works of those big consultancies that currently leach off them.

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Cloud computing is just another hype like so many before. It's nothing new, only the name is new.

Surprisingly despite all the technological advancement, IT (from an employee perspective) hasn't actually changed much in the last 30-40 years.

terminal > mainframe with time shares

web browser > "cloud" consisting of virtual machines

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Cloud computing is just another hype like so many before. It's nothing new, only the name is new.

Surprisingly despite all the technological advancement, IT (from an employee perspective) hasn't actually changed much in the last 30-40 years.

terminal > mainframe with time shares

web browser > "cloud" consisting of virtual machines

+1

Give it 5 years and furs walk be moving back in house

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Cloud computing will have a massive impact, but not in the way people expect. Combine cloud services, VDI, and fast home internet connections and the death of the home PC may very well become true.

As for the corporate world, well hosted services are nothing new, about 3 years ago some of our services were moved to a hosted service, citing costs, effeciency, and service improvement. Now we're bringing the same services back in house, citing, cost, efficency, and service improvement.

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Some software sits more comfortably on the cloud, other software sits better locally.

TBH, as long as the software runs quickly enough (software and connection), why not run it on the cloud? It means you can simplify the local hardware, while still being able to run powerful applications. As it means you can use the cloud anywhere, there is a convenience factor too.

I wouldn't be surprised if even computer games end up on the cloud too, with a custom remote controller for the TV being sufficient. Then there is Chrome OS, which completely relies on the cloud (and Linux ofc).

As broadband bandwidth increases and latency falls, it's a pretty inevitable pathway, IMO. If it cuts down on support issues, then it's good progress too.

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I am reading a really interesting book about cloud computing, something I knew next to nothing about until a few days ago. I had heard it mentioned and decided to investigate more.

Its all very exciting and scary. I am sure many of you are doing jobs that didn't exist ten or more years ago. What impact will the widespread adoption of cloud computing have on the economy, knocking on to jobs and of course, house prices? How many of you will have to retrain??

It would make an incredible difference if introduced into the public services. Really put a spanner in the works of those big consultancies that currently leach off them.

I remember something called the Paperless Office. That must have scared the life out of the paper industry.

Didn't happen, though, did it?

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I am reading a really interesting book about cloud computing, something I knew next to nothing about until a few days ago. I had heard it mentioned and decided to investigate more.

Its all very exciting and scary. I am sure many of you are doing jobs that didn't exist ten or more years ago. What impact will the widespread adoption of cloud computing have on the economy, knocking on to jobs and of course, house prices? How many of you will have to retrain??

It would make an incredible difference if introduced into the public services. Really put a spanner in the works of those big consultancies that currently leach off them.

About 15 years ago, it was called "thin client computing". Yes, some people will use it, but a lot of people will prefer to have their data on servers they can touch.

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...

I wouldn't be surprised if even computer games end up on the cloud too, with a custom remote controller for the TV being sufficient. Then there is Chrome OS, which completely relies on the cloud (and Linux ofc).

...

Cloud based gaming has arrived - OnLive

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Cloud is a big subject.

Could mean:

Infrastructure as a Service

Application as a Service

Platform as a Service

Storage as a Service

Middleware as a Service

etc etc

I am slightly cynical about IaaS as isn't it just hosting? AaaS and PaaS are probably where the value is.

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About 15 years ago, it was called "thin client computing". Yes, some people will use it, but a lot of people will prefer to have their data on servers they can touch.

[Reply of '+1' was eaten by a fat client now stuck in a cloud fog. Unable to connect to server. Abort everything.]

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About 15 years ago, it was called "thin client computing". Yes, some people will use it, but a lot of people will prefer to have their data on servers they can touch.

wasn't that one of Oracles fave ideas ?

Cloud based gaming has arrived - OnLive

prices seem very expensive for the time period, and for a game that you cannot sell on. ie: i bought new Deus Ex for £30 from tesco, I could sell for

cheapest on amazon & get £13 back after deduction of their 20% cut.

I am a fan of renting 360 games from lovefilm @ £14 a month (approx 50 p a day ) for 2 dvd discs or 2 games with several discs (eg. La Noir had 3 discs)

Mind you many kindles books are a rip off, considering there is no postage cost & no resell value compared to paper books( although kindle books have 20% vat, paper books don't).

TFH angle: You can always burn a book to keep warm if you can't sell it :D

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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The biggest impact cloud computing will have is to accelerate the globalisation of IT skills and lowering of UK IT wages as it doesn't matter if someone is in India or the Philippines (I have outsourced to both) as people can log onto and administrate / develop services etc as if they were sat a few metres from the old server rooms.

Technology and especially IT is making more and more people unemployed in the West and I think history will only repeat itself with IT going the same way as manufacturing, ship building / coal mining etc - east!

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Cloud is a big subject.

Could mean:

Infrastructure as a Service

Application as a Service

Platform as a Service

Storage as a Service

Middleware as a Service

etc etc

I am slightly cynical about IaaS as isn't it just hosting? AaaS and PaaS are probably where the value is.

this is virtually correct.

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The biggest impact cloud computing will have is to accelerate the globalisation of IT skills and lowering of UK IT wages as it doesn't matter if someone is in India or the Philippines (I have outsourced to both) as people can log onto and administrate / develop services etc as if they were sat a few metres from the old server rooms.

Technology and especially IT is making more and more people unemployed in the West and I think history will only repeat itself with IT going the same way as manufacturing, ship building / coal mining etc - east!

Only for those who don't move with the times and keep their skills up to date....

Joel Goodman (Oracle DBA par excellence) wrote a paper called 'DBA 2.0', about how you could no longer be just a specialist, but had to know about SANs, networks, OS config, development etc - as well as having the cultural nous & work ethic to compete against those from 'abroad' i.e. your compeditors could be from any corner of the globe.

Difference is that those in the West(no matter what colour or creed they are) have the soft skills required to do the job, and the work ethic. Those from, for example, the Indian sub continent (where IT is a fast way for a poor, but bright individual to earn undreamt of wealth in that country i.e. £35k a year) will cut any corner, and get any specialism, that they think will get them in the door. Ain't going to happen - the established pros who have 10 years experience will trump them every time. Graddies in the UK or from any other country (so again of any colour / creed) can forget it too (unfortunately).

In short, good people and hard to find, and the market for those people is as healthy as ever.

IT rant over (sorry...)

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I remember something called the Paperless Office. That must have scared the life out of the paper industry.

Didn't happen, though, did it?

Actually, there's a lot less paper in my office than 35 years ago.

Back then, we had no PCs or terminals in the office, so we had lots of printed manuals and books, and kept refrerence listings of the code we supported. Various working documents were printed out and placed in notebooks. Back then I had two "5-highs" (about 30 feet of shelf space) that were 80% filled with paper printouts of one kind or another. We debugged software problems from printed dumps. We used to get printed paper memos through the office mail. Before that, back in the 1960s, we stored program source on punched cards (couldn't trust disks back then), and even operating system binaries were distributed on cards (IBM 1130 system).

Now, I have a single 5-high, and only about 5 feet of shelf space contains printed paper of some sort. With PCs in the office, specs/working documents are all online, and email has 100% replaced office memos. Dumps (millions? of pages long) are looked at with a software dump viewer. Listings are online, too (they're also thousands of pages long these days, especially C/C++). I print out only selected pages/chapters of few manuals, for quick reference. Other stuff is seldom printed out.

Paper has probably been reduced 80-90%, and is perhaps 95-99% less than it would be if we used the same methods now as in the 1960s.

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The biggest impact cloud computing will have is to accelerate the globalisation of IT skills and lowering of UK IT wages as it doesn't matter if someone is in India or the Philippines (I have outsourced to both) as people can log onto and administrate / develop services etc as if they were sat a few metres from the old server rooms.

Technology and especially IT is making more and more people unemployed in the West and I think history will only repeat itself with IT going the same way as manufacturing, ship building / coal mining etc - east!

I don't disagree with some of this but then you get to talk to them or view their documentation and realise English clearly isn't their first language. In software design or testing correct communication can be crucial.

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I remember something called the Paperless Office. That must have scared the life out of the paper industry.

Didn't happen, though, did it?

I find the paperwork gets shifted onto me, ie. clients send me the stuff online and I have to print it up. They get the saving, I get the extra expense!

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Difference is that those in the West(no matter what colour or creed they are) have the soft skills required to do the job, and the work ethic. Those from, for example, the Indian sub continent (where IT is a fast way for a poor, but bright individual to earn undreamt of wealth in that country i.e. £35k a year) will cut any corner, and get any specialism, that they think will get them in the door. Ain't going to happen - the established pros who have 10 years experience will trump them every time. Graddies in the UK or from any other country (so again of any colour / creed) can forget it too (unfortunately).

Not sure I can agree with your work ethic argument regarding west vs east - there are a lot of clock watching slackers over here <_<

Established pros with proven experience are relatively safe I agree but for normal undergraduates in the UK starting out with no real experience they are competing against people in the east with masters / phds etc etc and outsourcing companies able to deliver at 1/3 of UK costs minus the red tape etc.

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Cloud computing is just another hype like so many before. It's nothing new, only the name is new.

Surprisingly despite all the technological advancement, IT (from an employee perspective) hasn't actually changed much in the last 30-40 years.

terminal > mainframe with time shares

web browser > "cloud" consisting of virtual machines

+100

Flogging IT as a service has been around since the days of mainframe Computer Bureaus of the 1970s. There is no idea in thus business that is so old it can't be taken out, dusted down, given a lick of paint and sold to the suckers as the next big thing in technology. To be fair if means a return to the reliabilty of mainframe operating systems and applications rather than the amateur hour horrors that infect many desktops then it won't be an entirely bad thing

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Cloud based gaming has arrived - OnLive

I've got a fast, wired connection & can't get onlive to work, keeps coming up with the message 'Network Problem' (ie v slow etc).. I've played xbox live no problem, no lag, dunno what's up with this! :unsure:

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Its all very exciting and scary. I am sure many of you are doing jobs that didn't exist ten or more years ago.

I'm currently doing Unixy TCP/IPy type stuff like I've been doing since... 1984. The main difference is i'm using Centos today whereas it was BSD 4.2 or Unix 7 back in the day. Oh and back then we had VAX and PDP/11 and green screens and now I have an SSH client on my android and can work from the pub. Which is nice.

I fully expect to retire having done pretty much the same stuff all my working life.

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The biggest impact cloud computing will have is to accelerate the globalisation of IT skills and lowering of UK IT wages as it doesn't matter if someone is in India or the Philippines (I have outsourced to both) as people can log onto and administrate / develop services etc as if they were sat a few metres from the old server rooms.

Technology and especially IT is making more and more people unemployed in the West and I think history will only repeat itself with IT going the same way as manufacturing, ship building / coal mining etc - east!

+1

My old boss was an apprentice coal miner in the 80's when it kicked off and now an IT manager. Think its safe to say he'll never pick the right lotto numbers.

:lol:

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Cloud based gaming has arrived - OnLive

Yes - I have just been trying this as they offer a deal for BT broadband users of 3 months 'subscription' free (it's not actually a subscription, it's access to a basic package of games normally £6.99 a month) with BT not counting any bandwidth used for the system off your monthly allowance until Jan 2012.

First impressions, surprisingly good even on the decrepit PC I'm using at the moment. You can also get a dedicated 'console' for £70 which is basically a simple streaming box with the ability to accept a joypad as all the processing is done in their datacentre somewhere on the interweb and streamed to you.

This could definitely shake up the games console industry. You essentially have the capabilities of a top-end gaming PC with no need to faff around with anything so long as you have a basic computer/their cheap STB and a decent broadband connection for the streaming. Obviously the likes of BT sense an opportunity to get you to pay for a suitable Broadband package which is why they are offering the free deal at the moment, I guess a large part of the likely success/failure of the system will depend on how ISPs react.

Plus, it's a ready made streaming TV/ movies/ sports PPV service. Could really hit the likes of Sky if they get a lot of subscribers signed up and start offering actual TV content as well as gaming.

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My first commercial IT project 15yrs ago was ripping out an IBM mainframe system at a insurance companies HQ now I'm doing the exact opposite, projects putting inCitrix & VMWare VDI systems, go figure??

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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