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Quality Of Pc Components Deteriorating?

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We usually buy Viglen PC's at work and the last batch I've had to call out the engineer to them around 3 or 4 times, we bought around 10 PC's that's a failure rate of 30%-40%. I can't imagine this failure rate across the company as that would be insane.

Now it could just be bad luck but has anyone else noticed a more failures in IT equipment from all manufacturers? I can remember Denniger going nuts over Chinese capacitors a few years ago.

http://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?singlepost=2139241

http://www.theeestory.com/topics/6139

Not all of the problems are down to this as some had faulty Ram, but I'm guessing more manufacturing in components has been shifted to China over the years has the quality of the products deteriorated?

Surely for the end manufacturer this will start eating in profit margins?

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Blimey, Viglen....theres a name from the past...decimated by MS support to Dell and other US firms.

Best buy a quality brand like...Escom....

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Most manufacturers have had a bad run at times, for example from failing memory:

IBM and the wretched DeskStar disks: http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/1018121/ibm-settles-deskstar-75gxp-class-action-suit

Some ASRock motherboards - hit a good reseller here in Switzerland

So Viglen could just be unlucky. As others have said - buy from a major name.

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Having major problems with a certain German company's gear at the moment. Appalling quality control in the Mexican factory. It took eight months for them to even acknowledge there was a problem by which time we had installed over 100 system. All need to replaced and rebuilt.

Also having problems with PCs from the same brand although the same machine with the HP branding doesn't seem to suffer with the issue.

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I thought that the Chinese bits didn't use such new fangled ideas even if labeled as doing so.:rolleyes:

I'd assumed that they get tested occasionally, otherwise we wouldn't find out about the latest batch of toys painted with lead and arsenic.

I'm starting to run out of lead / tin solder :( I've got some non-cored, and can get more, for non-electrical work (along with even more unpleasant solders with a fair amount of cadmium in them), but not so much of the bog-standard electrical stuff.

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I'd assumed that they get tested occasionally, otherwise we wouldn't find out about the latest batch of toys painted with lead and arsenic.

I'm starting to run out of lead / tin solder :( I've got some non-cored, and can get more, for non-electrical work (along with even more unpleasant solders with a fair amount of cadmium in them), but not so much of the bog-standard electrical stuff.

I read somewhere recently that the problem with older type solders is not in fact that they are lead based but the flux.

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I read somewhere recently that the problem with older type solders is not in fact that they are lead based but the flux.

The standard electrical flux is rosin, which AFAIK is just some tree sap, the same stuff that gets used on violin strings. Might not be good to breath in when you're soldering but that's easily avoided. I don't think that the flux has changed. Some fluxes used for non-electrical soldering can be fairly nasty (often acids that need neutralising afterwards if the soldered piece isn't to fall apart eventually).

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i've only really had issues with western digital hard drives , seagate has been great for me

other hardware failures have been for components over 5 years old which i feel is perfectly reasonable

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i've only really had issues with western digital hard drives , seagate has been great for me

other hardware failures have been for components over 5 years old which i feel is perfectly reasonable

I prefer Seagate as well, although as all competition has effectively gone now in the market there isn't much of a choice about who to use.

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i've only really had issues with western digital hard drives , seagate has been great for me

other hardware failures have been for components over 5 years old which i feel is perfectly reasonable

Same here, I have a 500GB SATA drive I purchased in 2007 that crapped itself last month, credit to W.D. they have a 5 year guarantee and sent a replacement immediately.

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I'd say so.

I've had 3 components fail on me within 2 years (Graphics card, RAM, and PSU)

I've never had anything fail on me before that.

I think most technology these days is poorly made, always seem to be sending stuff back under warranty. <_<

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I'd assumed that they get tested occasionally, otherwise we wouldn't find out about the latest batch of toys painted with lead and arsenic.

I'm starting to run out of lead / tin solder :( I've got some non-cored, and can get more, for non-electrical work (along with even more unpleasant solders with a fair amount of cadmium in them), but not so much of the bog-standard electrical stuff.

Go to RS and you can buy as much as you want.

AFAIKT ROHS bans the sale of products containing certain substances (including lead) but not the solder itself.

This kind of makes sense. You don't want to mix lead/non lead because the joint is much weaker and there is still tons of stuff out there that needs leaded solder to repair it.

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Cheap capacitors (or just badly spec'ed/made ones) cause a lot of failures.

Look at some of the marketing blurb of high end components - they advertise that they use long lasting high quality caps - they know the score.

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People / manufacturers love shaving corners - if you start a PC build with a PSU costing £4.99 (or a case for £20 with a built in 400W PSU) then it's bound to end in tears.

The oddest thing I've seen recently is the WiFi on routers failing with age. From an electronics POV I can't see what would be wearing out, but they do seem to get unreliable with age. This doesn't seem to be any particular make.

Buckers

The failing with age may well be good quality control, I'm serious.

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The problem is the price point, and the fact that money isn't worth what it was any more. I spent about £200 on memory for my old PC. If I spent the same again 6 years later, the real equivalent would be about £150. Instead, to get the same quality, I spent £250 - and I got 24GB, but the point still stands.

It is a bit like clothes washing machines. Everyone says that the modern stuff doesn't last like it used to in the 70s/80s - but the machine cost £400 in the 80s, and we expect a £200 one today to be as good. You can still get a good washing machine - it just costs £1K, which is about the same as £400 in the 80s...

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People / manufacturers love shaving corners - if you start a PC build with a PSU costing £4.99 (or a case for £20 with a built in 400W PSU) then it's bound to end in tears.

The oddest thing I've seen recently is the WiFi on routers failing with age. From an electronics POV I can't see what would be wearing out, but they do seem to get unreliable with age. This doesn't seem to be any particular make.

Buckers

Power supply. Netgear particularly. Have a look at the amperage rating on a failed Netgear router - say 0.75 amp. Go to Maplins and buy one rated at 1.5 amp and in many/most cases the problem is solved.

p-o-p

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Not all of the problems are down to this as some had faulty Ram, but I'm guessing more manufacturing in components has been shifted to China over the years has the quality of the products deteriorated?

Surely for the end manufacturer this will start eating in profit margins?

One of the most expensive materials used in computer components for end users is the cardboard used for the packaging. Its much thinner now.

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Cheap capacitors (or just badly spec'ed/made ones) cause a lot of failures.

Look at some of the marketing blurb of high end components - they advertise that they use long lasting high quality caps - they know the score.

Oh yeah I remember back when I was more into diy hifi audio (stopped by the wife) there was an article about a load of 'dodgy' possibly fake capacitors. I've seen bulgy ones, and have seen the aftermath of one which exploded.

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My Dell laptop has lasted me over 4 years now whereas when I was building my own PC components failed all the time.

My advice to you is forget desktops, go with cheap laptops en masse. They are easily powerful enough for most tasks and you can still connect an external monitor, mouse and even keyboard if you really wanted to.

Only reason for using a desktop is if you need the power for graphic design or gaming.

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  • 343 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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