Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Mr. Piddle

Build Your Own Home For £3,000!

Recommended Posts

Fed up with huge mortgage costs......... (arn't we all)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2039719/Simon-Dale-How-I-built-hobbit-house-Wales-just-3-000.html

Particularly liked this bit:

He said: 'Being your own have-a-go architect is a lot of fun and allows you to create and enjoy something which is part of yourself and the land rather than, at worst, a mass-produced box designed for maximum profit and the convenience of the construction industry.

Would anyone else consider having a go?

Edited by mason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would anyone else consider having a go?

I've been converting an old piggery in my garden for the last few months, cost around £14K for the first 600sqft and it will be the same again for an additional 600sqft. This can then be used as accommodation for guests, elderly relatives and the kids can have it when they are old enough. Finally,the Mrs and I will move into it and the kids can have the house (a neighbour is doing this).

So <£30k for 1200sqft bungalow doing a lot of the work myself. Loads of insulation so warm and cheap to run. No planning permission required but it does need building regs.

So 10x more than the building in the daily mail but 10x less than equivalent house for sale.

The outbuilding exemptions are a nice loophole for building a house for your kids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been converting an old piggery in my garden for the last few months, cost around £14K for the first 600sqft and it will be the same again for an additional 600sqft. This can then be used as accommodation for guests, elderly relatives and the kids can have it when they are old enough. Finally,the Mrs and I will move into it and the kids can have the house (a neighbour is doing this).

So <£30k for 1200sqft bungalow doing a lot of the work myself. Loads of insulation so warm and cheap to run. No planning permission required but it does need building regs.

So 10x more than the building in the daily mail but 10x less than equivalent house for sale.

The outbuilding exemptions are a nice loophole for building a house for your kids.

Where do you put your pigs now ?

:rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would anyone else consider having a go?

Getting planning permission and buying the land is the problem. Anyone can pickup free materials and build a house, man has been doing it for hundreds of thousands of years. The council will bulldoze it in a flash.

Wooden houses have a limited lifespan, I suspect that it would have a very limited life. Damp, insects, rodents, warping wood. I'd like to see it in 10 years, if its still standing and hasn't fallen foul of the building regulations

He claims to use green wood, but the pictures show very well cured trunks of trees. Doesn't make sense that you could use freshly cut trees.

Edited by Peter Hun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The council will bulldoze it in a flash.

Exactly.

Very interested in this outbuilding exemption loophole though.

Back when I was thinking of buying I looked at a 1930s semi with a big garden and a workshop at the end of the garden (concrete walls, not a shed) - can such a structure be converted into a legal dwelling (fully connected to services etc) without planning permission?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would happily buy some land and live in a static home, if only the feds would leave me to it. But that will never happen. Unless you are a debt slave they hunt you down and administer pain.

Edited by Lewis Gordon Pugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly.

Very interested in this outbuilding exemption loophole though.

Back when I was thinking of buying I looked at a 1930s semi with a big garden and a workshop at the end of the garden (concrete walls, not a shed) - can such a structure be converted into a legal dwelling (fully connected to services etc) without planning permission?

Planning permission for outbuilding rules:

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/outbuildings/

You can't sell or rent the outbuilding as a separate dwelling but it can be used as guest accommodation or for relatives, in association with the main house.

Several of my neighbours have their grown up offspring living in converted outbuildings. Some do rent theirs but I understand this is not legal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wooden houses have a limited lifespan, I suspect that it would have a very limited life. Damp, insects, rodents, warping wood. I'd like to see it in 10 years, if its still standing and hasn't fallen foul of the building regulations

Say 5 years = £3000/5 = £600 a year. Nah, can't afford it... In reality, you'd fix and/or replace any problems as you went along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would happily buy some land and live in a static home, if only the feds would leave me to it. But that will never happen. Unless you are a debt slave they hunt you down and administer pain.

One of the farmers that has done some work on my place built a house behind straw bales but was eventually found out by the council. He lost on appeal but was allowed to live in a caravan on his field rather than the house so he agreed to that.

He just lives in the house anyway now.

A neighbour sold her house but kept most of the land and outbuildings with it (stables mostly). She just built a cabin/shed and moved into it. The council know about it but don't seem to be doing anything. They have even provided her with some wheelie bins.

Other neighbours do similar things. (one has more than 10 workers living in caravans without planning permission).

Basically, you may as well break the rules and wait for them to catch you. I cant see that there is any penalty other than writing some letters to delay things as long as possible and buying a second field to move there when you finally get thrown off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fed up with huge mortgage costs......... (arn't we all)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2039719/Simon-Dale-How-I-built-hobbit-house-Wales-just-3-000.html

Particularly liked this bit:

He said: 'Being your own have-a-go architect is a lot of fun and allows you to create and enjoy something which is part of yourself and the land rather than, at worst, a mass-produced box designed for maximum profit and the convenience of the construction industry.

Would anyone else consider having a go?

I think it's marvellous, but the floor will rot very quickly!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the farmers that has done some work on my place built a house behind straw bales but was eventually found out by the council. He lost on appeal but was allowed to live in a caravan on his field rather than the house so he agreed to that.

He just lives in the house anyway now.

Is that the guy from Homes from Hell programme? Built a castle type building?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that the guy from Homes from Hell programme? Built a castle type building?

That mini-castle is near Gatwick, this one is near Cambridge. The one I know farms sheep but I understand that is not enough to justify living on the field (although Llamas are rumoured to be useful for that exemption).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting planning permission and buying the land is the problem. Anyone can pickup free materials and build a house, man has been doing it for hundreds of thousands of years. The council will bulldoze it in a flash.

What if you claim to be a persecuted minority like an Irish Traveller. I hear they get preferential treatment when it comes to planning enforcement :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Planning permission for outbuilding rules:

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/outbuildings/

You can't sell or rent the outbuilding as a separate dwelling but it can be used as guest accommodation or for relatives, in association with the main house.

Several of my neighbours have their grown up offspring living in converted outbuildings. Some do rent theirs but I understand this is not legal.

That's interesting, thanks very much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wooden houses have a limited lifespan, I suspect that it would have a very limited life. Damp, insects, rodents, warping wood.

What about Potton wood framed houses? (link)

I quite like their bungalow design

dy_bungalow.jpg

(Geese not included.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Say 5 years = £3000/5 = £600 a year. Nah, can't afford it... In reality, you'd fix and/or replace any problems as you went along.

Its on ongoing maintenance job, plus 1600 hours is 40 weeks work, not 3 months. He must have searched high and low for the wood and dried it out for months.

Not quite £3k, more like £50K if I did it, almost as much as a brick job

Edited by Peter Hun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've built a couple of places using similar materials to Simon Dale's. Green wood is fine to use and tannin rich hardwoods like oak and sweet chestnut are far more durable than presure treated softwood. If constructed properly this type of building is dryer and less susceptable to damp than one made from stone, brick or concrete. The walls have to breathe so only lime plaster and washes can be used. These are highly effective fungicides. It helps if you know what you're talking about before passing judgment on such a building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Planning permission for outbuilding rules:

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/outbuildings/

You can't sell or rent the outbuilding as a separate dwelling but it can be used as guest accommodation or for relatives, in association with the main house.

Several of my neighbours have their grown up offspring living in converted outbuildings. Some do rent theirs but I understand this is not legal.

Could you live in the outbuilding yourself, and rent out the main house?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting planning permission and buying the land is the problem. Anyone can pickup free materials and build a house, man has been doing it for hundreds of thousands of years. The council will bulldoze it in a flash.

Wooden houses have a limited lifespan, I suspect that it would have a very limited life. Damp, insects, rodents, warping wood. I'd like to see it in 10 years, if its still standing and hasn't fallen foul of the building regulations

He claims to use green wood, but the pictures show very well cured trunks of trees. Doesn't make sense that you could use freshly cut trees.

I'm sitting in a wooden house well over 100 years old and there are many more in the area!No problems yet and if there were they would be easily fixable with basic tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 338 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.