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All This: Will House Prices Rise, Will They Drop...

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if you are going to be somewhere for 5+ years, then inflation will make a mockery of the original capital you put down so yeah buy and hold.

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It's the near term that's really crazy- all this current volatility and melt down stuff should bring about a crash in prices on sentiment alone- but that assumes that people are rational about house prices :lol::lol::lol:

The temptation would be to wait just a little bit longer to see if there is some mass rush to the exits as people try to lock in capital appreciation before the endgame of a HPC- which would then precipitate the HPC :lol:

Or am I just deluding myself. I have this vision of the earth exploding and some wretched semi remains standing on floating fragment of rock. Inside the house the wife turns to the husband and asks 'Oh dear- do you think this will effect house prices'?

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I assume you have a decent amount for a deposit. So why not diversify that deposit and continue to rent rather than sinking it into a depreciating asset (the house not necessarily the land)?

Look if you are desperate for a place to call your own whether to placate your significant other, or to not feel left out in those conversations at work, or maybe just because you are worth it, then go ahead and buy. I figure you are only losing the diversification benefits of the money you will put in the house. Odds are the coalition will cave on their planning proposals, so you will only lose if the economy contracts.

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can't help thinking the best strategy is to buy (modestly and advantageously), live in, and hold

anyone disagree?

Yep, me too. It's driven me to the brink of insanity over the past 2 years.

So I've decided to stop worrying about the imminent collapse of western civilisation and start spending as much time as possible in the company of outrageously beautiful women.

I'm pretty happy with the results so far.

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can't help thinking the best strategy is to buy (modestly and advantageously), live in, and hold

anyone disagree?

no-one knows what the best strategy is - it depends upon the actions of too many parties

all you can do is weigh up your options and make the decision that is right for you, in your own unique circumstances

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I'm buying now! I'm pretty sure my savings are going nowhere fast.

Will have a small mortgage, which will be paid off in a few years.

Not really bothered whether house prices drop or not.

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I think it all depends on what happens with this supposed Greek/Euro crisis?

It has been talked about happening for such a long time, but the can has been kicked down the road again and again, that we are all jaded by it.

If Greece defaults and the global economy goes into melt-down it could be the best share buying opportunity in many decades... but will it happen? Or will they just keep having meetings that look as if something is being done when nothing is down. They could drag this out for years.

Then there is the issue of whether the US Fed will somehow QE the markets again - wait to see what Bernanke says this week to get an idea of where equities, gold, etc, are going.

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can't help thinking the best strategy is to buy (modestly and advantageously), live in, and hold

anyone disagree?

The difficult part is in bold. We are struggling to find anything modestly priced in the SW. If you can find something that fits these criteria, and can take advantage of longterm fixed sub-4% mortgage rates then you should be fine. In the end the decision is not just numerical: it's nice to live somewhere that's yours, even if the bank have first charge.

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I'm just looking ahead 3 months at a time.

Prices are likely to be down slightly, our savings will be 3k higher, plus the Yen will likely appreciate against the Gbp.(90% of our savings are in Yen)

Ask again in 3 months, maybe the wife and I will both be out of work and it will be wise to buy.

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I'm just looking ahead 3 months at a time.

Prices are likely to be down slightly, our savings will be 3k higher, plus the Yen will likely appreciate against the Gbp.(90% of our savings are in Yen)

Ask again in 3 months, maybe the wife and I will both be out of work and it will be wise to buy.

i try to not look more than 500 years ahead for my investment horizon, any more and its guesswork

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if you are going to be somewhere for 5+ years, then inflation will make a mockery of the original capital you put down so yeah buy and hold.

Buy now, if like the place enough and can cope with living there for 15 year plus.....can get a low low interest rate paying the capital down over the years.......buy second hand furniture and learn to live on a tight budget, but having a good time at the same time and treating yourself now and then.......change your friends if necessary if they are the excess spending materialist types where you always have to have a new outfit and the latest car, gadget, watch, and phone to impress. ;)

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If interest rates stay at the unprecedented low over the lifetime of a mortgage, it begins to make sense to look into buying. That's quite an if, or is it...

This is one of the dangers of keeping rates low. It is so stupid and irresponsible, in the longer term it will do enormous damage. Today they need to be kept low because if they rise the massive number of thick irresponsible people who bought without thinking using money they had no hope of repaying will be homeless. Politicians think this would be bad, i do not. But anyway, they are low for that reason. So now the more sensible types are looking at this situation and considering just piling in as well. And why not.

What we are seeing is this collection of over indebted idiots being joined by the savvy, in the belief that the government will remain cowardly and look to the short term, which on the face of it looks to be a reasonable assumption. And then what? No chance then of interest rates rising, the proportion of the population that can't take a rise has gone up, making it impossible. Low rates, devalued currency, higher cost of imports, lower standard of living. Grind grind grind down and down.

The housing will then be affordable, hurrah. No one can afford to eat or heat their home or travel, but hey, small price to pay for the British public, let's all ruin our lives for the sake of a tedious semi in suburbia. Brilliant.

My question is, since this is where we are heading, why do you want a piece of the uk anyway?

Edited by cybernoid

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It's the near term that's really crazy- all this current volatility and melt down stuff should bring about a crash in prices on sentiment alone- but that assumes that people are rational about house prices :lol::lol::lol:

The temptation would be to wait just a little bit longer to see if there is some mass rush to the exits as people try to lock in capital appreciation before the endgame of a HPC- which would then precipitate the HPC :lol:

Or am I just deluding myself. I have this vision of the earth exploding and some wretched semi remains standing on floating fragment of rock. Inside the house the wife turns to the husband and asks 'Oh dear- do you think this will effect house prices'?

:D

Here's the Tv addicts equivalent image

ManwithTV.gif

Ronn Cobb (1968 Raw Sewage Underground Comics)

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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hahahahaha best forum thread title ever, well put. Saves reading 99% of the other threads on this forum.

When the house you have paid for drops by half......the next unencumbered house you buy will be half price. ;)

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i veiwed a house not 1 hour ago, as ive been waiting and getting fed up, on veiwing it thier was a couple in thier with a baby, talking seriously about converting this and that

the place had been thrown together black mould everywhere prehistoric heating, it was terrible nice area it was on for 125k in need of knocking down and rebuilding, all i kept thinking was REALLY!! YOUR SERIOUSLY CONSIDERING THIS!! i wont be rushing into anything

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hahahahaha best forum thread title ever, well put. Saves reading 99% of the other threads on this forum.

I sold a 5bed farmhouse in July 2010 and have just bought modestly.A semi detached on the market for £129,995.I got it at £111k .Just had a 125k bid accepted on another on at £149,950.I dare not leave the money in the bank how thiongs are looking.

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  • 332 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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