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The Generation Game

Are We Going To See A Surge Of Mature Housewives/husbands Attending University

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I have just been looking at the Beeb student finance calculator and there some interesting statistics that come out of it.

The average man with a degree earning the national average will be earning £51k at age 50 (presumably nominal in 32 years time). Seems like quite a lot.

The average woman with a degree earning the national average will be earning under £30k. Further to this she will have only been above the threshold of repayment for 5 years and the table states she will have repaid £1,000 and had £60,000 written off (assuming that she did a 4-year course and claimed £9k pa fees and £5k pa maintenance).

1. Is any of this maintenance means-tested any more, or could someone in reasonable circumstances study at their local university and clear £5k in maintenance into the savings vehicle of their choice every year?

2. Who pays for the write-off in 30 years time? The taxpayer?

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1. Is any of this maintenance means-tested any more, or could someone in reasonable circumstances study at their local university and clear £5k in maintenance into the savings vehicle of their choice every year?

Maintenance grants are means tested. I think you might still be able to get maintenance loans, but obviously they need to be paid back as well.

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I have just been looking at the Beeb student finance calculator and there some interesting statistics that come out of it.

The average man with a degree earning the national average will be earning £51k at age 50 (presumably nominal in 32 years time). Seems like quite a lot.

The average woman with a degree earning the national average will be earning under £30k. Further to this she will have only been above the threshold of repayment for 5 years and the table states she will have repaid £1,000 and had £60,000 written off (assuming that she did a 4-year course and claimed £9k pa fees and £5k pa maintenance).

1. Is any of this maintenance means-tested any more, or could someone in reasonable circumstances study at their local university and clear £5k in maintenance into the savings vehicle of their choice every year?

2. Who pays for the write-off in 30 years time? The taxpayer?

Student Loans are run by the Student Loans Company - a govt quango...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Student_loans_in_the_United_Kingdom

I'd imagine that those paying back fund those who don't pay back after 30 years/reach 65...

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I have just been looking at the Beeb student finance calculator and there some interesting statistics that come out of it.

The average man with a degree earning the national average will be earning £51k at age 50 (presumably nominal in 32 years time). Seems like quite a lot.

The average woman with a degree earning the national average will be earning under £30k. Further to this she will have only been above the threshold of repayment for 5 years and the table states she will have repaid £1,000 and had £60,000 written off (assuming that she did a 4-year course and claimed £9k pa fees and £5k pa maintenance).

1. Is any of this maintenance means-tested any more, or could someone in reasonable circumstances study at their local university and clear £5k in maintenance into the savings vehicle of their choice every year?

2. Who pays for the write-off in 30 years time? The taxpayer?

with 50% of people having a degree, the average of 51K is going to drop.....fast.

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Funny how the best educational plan is to get a degree only when you no longer need it.

I wonder if you can buy a "futures degree" i.e. I promise to get one later, its just a bit expensive at the moment, gissa job.

A friend of mine has just finished his PhD, he is in his mid 80's.

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Funny how the best educational plan is to get a degree only when you no longer need it.

I wonder if you can buy a "futures degree" i.e. I promise to get one later, its just a bit expensive at the moment, gissa job.

A friend of mine has just finished his PhD, he is in his mid 80's.

Given what's going to happen with inflation, it's just as free as it used to be. :)

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Maintenance grants are means tested. I think you might still be able to get maintenance loans, but obviously they need to be paid back as well.

The beeb link does say you are able to get maintenance loans up to £5,500 per annum. If you never intend to work again (or at least earn enough that you ever surpass the repayment threshold) can you not get an easy £22k (over 4 years) in the bank there and essentially a free education?

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Student Loans are run by the Student Loans Company - a govt quango...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Student_loans_in_the_United_Kingdom

Weren't they looking at selling the loan book on to private investors at the same time as the port of Dover?

I'd imagine that those paying back fund those who don't pay back after 30 years/reach 65...

At 50% of school-leavers, to me it looks like it will be massively loss-making and will arguably attract those who have the least need for higher education from a future productivity point of view.

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The beeb link does say you are able to get maintenance loans up to £5,500 per annum. If you never intend to work again (or at least earn enough that you ever surpass the repayment threshold) can you not get an easy £22k (over 4 years) in the bank there and essentially a free education?

Sounds perfect for pensioners across the land.

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with 50% of people having a degree, the average of 51K is going to drop.....fast.

Most 50 year olds don't have a degree....they didn't need one, they were taught all that they know whilst working throughout their working life for free, and getting paid for it at the same time.....most degrees nowadays don't teach you what you need to know anyway....they bide the time, the best time in anyone's life to make the biggest strides forward is whilst you are young.....some time is wasted big time both in time and in money ;)

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I have just been looking at the Beeb student finance calculator and there some interesting statistics that come out of it.

The average man with a degree earning the national average will be earning £51k at age 50 (presumably nominal in 32 years time). Seems like quite a lot.

The average woman with a degree earning the national average will be earning under £30k. Further to this she will have only been above the threshold of repayment for 5 years and the table states she will have repaid £1,000 and had £60,000 written off (assuming that she did a 4-year course and claimed £9k pa fees and £5k pa maintenance).

1. Is any of this maintenance means-tested any more, or could someone in reasonable circumstances study at their local university and clear £5k in maintenance into the savings vehicle of their choice every year?

2. Who pays for the write-off in 30 years time? The taxpayer?

Plus the debt gets written of when you reach 60,so you are best doing your degree at 57 years of age. :rolleyes:

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with 50% of people having a degree, the average of 51K is going to drop.....fast.

Given that at the last count, only 42% of school leavers went on to HE and that the number of HEFCE-subsidised university places is in decline, where are the other 8% coming from? 50% was Blair's target, but he never met it.

A friend of mine has just finished his PhD, he is in his mid 80's.

I'm supervising one in his late 60s. Doing it part-time to minimise the fees, and living off his pension. As the final-salary-pension retireds are one of the few groups that can afford postgraduate study without having to borrow, I suspect we're going to see more of them, and the universities will make an active attempt to develop this 'market'.

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  • 335 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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