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happy_renting

T F H Larder

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I've finally decided to clear out my TFH food stash, digging out the old tin cans, wiping off the squirrel droppings, etc.

More seriously, I do have quite a few ancient tins at the back of the cupboard that seem too good to waste.

I've weeded out the cans priced in £sd , and the Tesco Value stuff where the tin tops and bottoms are now hemispherical instead of flat. But is the rest edible?

I have seen a documentary suggesting thst canned food is still edible after decades, as long as it was prepared properly (heated) - botulism being the exception.

Some of the stuff has Best Before dates back to about 2003. I'm hoping that it may have matured like a good wine.

Should I chance it? I might open a few and test them out... :ph34r:

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As far as i'm aware, if the can's undamaged (ie: no dents, leaks or bulging - indicating bacteria inside) and has not been subjected to excessive ambient temperature (left out in full sun during the summer) it should be good for a very long time.

I read a couple of years back that someone had found some canned food from the first world war and it was still safe to eat.

Use your nose! Open the tin and simply smell and examine it first. Always discard foods that have developed an off odor, flavour or just look plain weird.

I read that one possible exception could be items that are quite acidic like tomatoes and some fruits. Can anyone confirm?

Thye'd probably just explode when you open them anyway which would be a good indicator not to eat 'em....

I found some cans of chicken curry whilst having a 'stock take' in the pantry last year that were 'use by' 2001 and they tasted fine to me and they didn't kill me :D

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As far as i'm aware, if the can's undamaged (ie: no dents, leaks or bulging - indicating bacteria inside) and has not been subjected to excessive ambient temperature (left out in full sun during the summer) it should be good for a very long time.

I read a couple of years back that someone had found some canned food from the first world war and it was still safe to eat.

Use your nose! Open the tin and simply smell and examine it first. Always discard foods that have developed an off odor, flavour or just look plain weird.

I read that one possible exception could be items that are quite acidic like tomatoes and some fruits. Can anyone confirm?

Thye'd probably just explode when you open them anyway which would be a good indicator not to eat 'em....

I found some cans of chicken curry whilst having a 'stock take' in the pantry last year that were 'use by' 2001 and they tasted fine to me and they didn't kill me :D

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Afaik, tomatoes & acidic fruits can react with the metal of uncoated tins, so to be safe, chuck out if not in a tin with interior coating. Good luck.

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Personally I would eat meat and fish that is well over date. They aren't acidic and the fats will help protect the plastic.

Comments about tomatoes/fruits spot on.

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What you have stated suggests to me your diet is such you need toilet roll perhaps even copious amounts if its a bit runny. :unsure:

A good diet means you dont need toilet roll as nature intended.

You are talking shit. :lol:

It's not me who is going to eat food years past it's sell by date and get the trots.

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I don't want to alarm anyone, but has happy renting posted since?!?

:unsure:

'm still here. Not eating unti later tonight.

I'll don my biohazard suit and hilarious woman's-boobs apron and tackle a can of pre-Fukushima tuna to start with. It may even be safer than the current 2011 stuff.

On the off-chance that anyone might be the slightest bit interested, I'll let you know how I get on.

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No, German toilets have a shelf in the 'drop zone' so you can examine your stools before flushing.

Every nation is weird in their own way. Would you expect the nation of Audi, Volkswagen and steel rimmed glasses and long leather coats NOT to have a poo fetish? I mean, the whole culture is anally retentive.

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I've finally decided to clear out my TFH food stash, digging out the old tin cans, wiping off the squirrel droppings, etc.

More seriously, I do have quite a few ancient tins at the back of the cupboard that seem too good to waste.

I've weeded out the cans priced in £sd , and the Tesco Value stuff where the tin tops and bottoms are now hemispherical instead of flat. But is the rest edible?

I have seen a documentary suggesting thst canned food is still edible after decades, as long as it was prepared properly (heated) - botulism being the exception.

Some of the stuff has Best Before dates back to about 2003. I'm hoping that it may have matured like a good wine.

Should I chance it? I might open a few and test them out... :ph34r:

As long as the packaging remains intact and you keep the tins below 45 degrees C they will be safe to eat indefinitely as the product is commercially sterile. If the tins get really hot there might be some thermophilic spoilage bacteria in there but they would blow the can so it would be obvious and in any case are not pathogenic.

The issue of acid products like tomatoes causing tin leaching is 12 years out of date. From the late 1990's all European manufacturers lacquered the insides of tins with plastic to minimise tin leaching.

Coincidentially tinned food (basically in glass jars but same principles) from the Napoleonic era are found periodically and the food is still safe to eat.

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Wouldn't freeze dried food be a better bet for the dedicated TFH?

Although the prices seem a bit off-putting.

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Wouldn't freeze dried food be a better bet for the dedicated TFH?

Although the prices seem a bit off-putting.

Nah - all that water and metal in tins make a great liner for your TFH nuclear shelter :D

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No, German toilets have a shelf in the 'drop zone' so you can examine your stools before flushing.

Every nation is weird in their own way. Would you expect the nation of Audi, Volkswagen and steel rimmed glasses and long leather coats NOT to have a poo fetish? I mean, the whole culture is anally retentive.

In complete contrast to the eastern style toilets in the middle east that appear to drop away into the bowels of hell itself :lol:

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Well the Tuna was OK - it wasn't green and nor am I. 2003 was a good vintage.

The hilarious woman's-boobs apron was not needed this time round. It all stayed down.

I think I have a tin of coelacanth in the stash somewhere too. Perhaps thats a bit too old....

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Well the Tuna was OK - it wasn't green and nor am I. 2003 was a good vintage.

The hilarious woman's-boobs apron was not needed this time round. It all stayed down.

I think I have a tin of coelacanth in the stash somewhere too. Perhaps thats a bit too old....

I once used a tin of chopped tomatoes that was 4 years out of date in a spag bol. It was inedible. So you might want to give any of them a good sniff test first.

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Legislation now requires canners to add a Best Before date. For most foods this date is entirely arbitrary and largely meaningless (although helpful for stock rotation). Acidic foods such as tomatoes or fruit in unlacquered cans may take on a metallic taste if kept for some years and should be rotated. Other foods, such as fish in brine or vegetables in water, can be kept for decades with little deterioration.

'Canned Food Safety: The Canning Process':

http://www.enotalone...ticle/7794.html

The steamboat Bertrand was heavily laden with provisions when it set out on the Missouri River in 1865, destined for the gold mining camps in Fort Benton, Mont. The boat snagged and swamped under the weight, sinking to the bottom of the river. It was found a century later, under 30 feet of silt a little north of Omaha, Neb.

Among the canned food items retrieved from the Bertrand in 1968 were brandied peaches, oysters, plum tomatoes, honey, and mixed vegetables. In 1974, chemists at the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) analyzed the products for bacterial contamination and nutrient value. Although the food had lost its fresh smell and appearance, the NFPA chemists detected no microbial growth and determined that the foods were as safe to eat as they had been when canned more than 100 years earlier.

The nutrient values varied depending upon the product and nutrient. NFPA chemists Janet Dudek and Edgar Elkins report that significant amounts of vitamins C and A were lost. But protein levels remained high, and all calcium values "were comparable to today's products."

NFPA chemists also analyzed a 40-year-old can of corn found in the basement of a home in California. Again, the canning process had kept the corn safe from contaminants and from much nutrient loss. In addition, Dudek says, the kernels looked and smelled like recently canned corn.

So, Mrs.T was right all along...

'Mrs Thatcher's food store to beat inflation':

http://www.margarett...document/101831

Mrs Thatcher, Conservative spokesman on economic affairs, is beating inflation in food prices by stocking up with tins of ham, tongue and sardines. In a taped interview to be published tomorrow in Pre Retirement Choice, Mrs Thatcher says she has been doing it for some time.

"People tend to think of storage these days in terms of deep freezing, but fresh meat won't keep in a deep freeze for more than a year," she said.

"Tinned food on the other hand will keep for five, 10 and 15 years. What you collect are the expensive proteins: ham, tongue, salmon, mackerel, sardines."

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Very old tins sealed with lead can be a problem (it helped wipe out Franklin's North West Passage expedition), but you're unlikely to have anything that old.

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As long as the packaging remains intact and you keep the tins below 45 degrees C they will be safe to eat indefinitely as the product is commercially sterile. If the tins get really hot there might be some thermophilic spoilage bacteria in there but they would blow the can so it would be obvious and in any case are not pathogenic.

The issue of acid products like tomatoes causing tin leaching is 12 years out of date. From the late 1990's all European manufacturers lacquered the insides of tins with plastic to minimise tin leaching.

Coincidentially tinned food (basically in glass jars but same principles) from the Napoleonic era are found periodically and the food is still safe to eat.

phew, I feel safe now opening my bottle of Bollinger 1776 now.

probably have it with a nice fish and chips.

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Better check the quality of the toilet rolls in your stash, for signs of disintegration.

You could be using more than normal as you eat the tinned stuff.

I wouldn't want to confront a fart from someone who'd eaten ten year old chicken curry...

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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