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Cycle Of 'compulsive Consumerism' Leaves British Family Life In Crisis

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British parents are trapping their children in a cycle of "compulsive consumerism" by showering them with toys and designer labels instead of spending quality time with them, a UN report has found.

The report by Unicef, the UN children's agency, warns that materialism has come to dominate family life in Britain as parents "pointlessly" amass goods for their children to compensate for their long working hours.

While parents said they felt compelled into buying more, the children themselves said spending time with their families made them happier.

Sue Palmer, author of the book Toxic Childhood, said: “We are teaching our children, practically from the moment they are born, that the one thing that matters is getting more stuff.

“We are probably the most secular society in the world, we do not have the counterbalance of religion but at the same time we are a very driven society very into progress and making money.”

source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/8760558/Cycle-of-compulsive-consumerism-leaves-British-family-life-in-crisis-Unicef-study-finds.html

The intelligentsia has very smugly mocked spirituality, but all they did was create a void with nothing to rush in but base materialism and greed for the biggest house (mortgage) and the most toys (literally in this case).

Edited by Britney's Piers

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source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/8760558/Cycle-of-compulsive-consumerism-leaves-British-family-life-in-crisis-Unicef-study-finds.html

The intelligentsia has very smugly mocked spirituality, but all they did was create a void with nothing to rush in but base materialism and greed for the biggest house (mortgage) and the most toys (literally in this case).

Death of Empire. I am sure the Romans were obsessed with house prices and cheap tat in the years following the Visigoths arriving in town :unsure:

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/8760558/Cycle-of-compulsive-consumerism-leaves-British-family-life-in-crisis-Unicef-study-finds.html

The report by Unicef, the UN children's agency, warns that materialism has come to dominate family life in Britain as parents "pointlessly" amass goods for their children to compensate for their long working hours.

While parents said they felt compelled into buying more, the children themselves said spending time with their families made them happier.

Unicef UK said the obsession was one of the underlying causes of the riots and widespread looting which gripped the UK last month, as teenagers targeted shops for the designer clothes and goods.

The study, which was jointly funded by the Department for Education, was commissioned after an earlier Unicef report ranked Britain as the worst country in the industrialised world to be a child.

Don't worry Mystic Merv is quickly destroying our consumer society via inflation.

I wonder how much of this spending has been funded by MEW?

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I don't think that was what they were saying.

They were saying that they were compensating for a lack of family life (2 earners to fund over priced homes) with 'gifts' of consumer goods.

Not that the consumer goods were the cause.

But why are people working long hours? To pay for consumer goods or housing/mortgage debt...

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The "inverted" nature of this is interesting. I pay though the nose for my boys education and we don't have this problem, because everything is banned at school. iPads, mobiles, personal laptops, blackberries, nin-jackos (he's 8, they are spinning lego things) all banned. I know that as soon as some craze takes off, within a week I will get a letter from the head man requesting that they are removed from the school. Pretty much nails it, the only consumer envy I saw last term was when one of them had a better cricket bat than his mates.

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But on the other hand not spending time with your children is not a problem.

Those tractors don't build themselves

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/sep/11/childcare-parenting-neuroscience-nurture

Why parents shouldn't feel guilty if they can't devote time to their toddlers

Critics are rejecting the theory that children need close attention in their first three years, dismissing neuroscience as 'neurotrash'

Edited by anotherpointlessnamechange

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Don't worry Mystic Merv is quickly destroying our consumer society via inflation.

I wonder how much of this spending has been funded by MEW?

Not the point.....more that consumer goodies have been used to substitute parental care and attention, time doing what will really matter in life, teaching life enhancing personal skills and manners.......give kids too much of what they want, when they want, then they go on to expect and think they are entitled, it is their right to get what they want by clicking their fingers or having a tantrum using psychological 'you don't love me, everyone else has got it' style tactics....some will have a huge shock coming to them, life is not like that. ;)

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But why are people working long hours? To pay for consumer goods or housing/mortgage debt...

Not for much longer - it will be to pay for basic foostuffs, energy, insurances and tax on top of the housing/mortgage debt.

Inflation is going to kill the "consumer" stone dead.

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My son doesn't do brands. (Although he wants a shiny mbile phone he isn't after a partcular one)

It is all about parent's and parenting style.

If you can not protect your child from consumerism, then you probably can't protect them from anything.

It is the easiest thing in the world to do.

Don't buy them brands. Don't buy yourself brands. Tell them that you don't have to wear brands to be nice and anyone who thinks that isn't worth bothering with.

Problem being I suspect a lot of parents are major consumerists.

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Not for much longer - it will be to pay for basic foostuffs, energy, insurances and tax on top of the housing/mortgage debt.

Inflation is going to kill the "consumer" stone dead.

I agree.....there will only be just enough to pay for the non-discretionary essentials, all the little add ons and extras will be extravagant luxuries, something to think hard about, work hard for and save up for.....when something is saved for it is appreciated more......sometimes by the time it is saved for it is no longer required or wanted. ;)

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I agree.....there will only be just enough to pay for the non-discretionary essentials, all the little add ons and extras will be extravagant luxuries, something to think hard about, work hard for and save up for.....when something is saved for it is appreciated more......sometimes by the time it is saved for it is no longer required or wanted. ;)

Back to "open all hours" style living then?

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Don't buy them brands. Don't buy yourself brands. Tell them that you don't have to wear brands to be nice and anyone who thinks that isn't worth bothering with.

Problem being I suspect a lot of parents are major consumerists.

I vaguely remember someone at school attempting to mock me for wearing non-branded socks.

I just thought it was funny - who buys branded socks?

But apparently it does really matter to some people which I find a bit sad.

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But apparently it does really matter to some people which I find a bit sad.

Only cos they are sad sacks.

Ignore them.

Does anyone at work look down on your for not having top brand name clothes?

(And you can find good quality brand name stuff at charity shops but I try to never buy any clothes that advertise who made them)

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Back to "open all hours" style living then?

I know that our house was an open house, a house many local kids preferred to spend their time at, quality play time old fashioned games like hopscotch, skipping, building camps, kicking a ball etc.....these kids felt at home, some came from families far wealthier, nicer cars and houses...some had to tread on eggshells in their own homes their parents spent time working to furnish it with stuff that looked good, too good to touch. ;)

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I vaguely remember someone at school attempting to mock me for wearing non-branded socks.

I just thought it was funny - who buys branded socks?

But apparently it does really matter to some people which I find a bit sad.

Yes! I grew up in the late 70s/early 80s on the cusp of the end of the good old days and the beginning of the consumerist era. For most of my childhood everything had to be scrimped and saved for, second hand bicycle as a present for birthday AND Christmas, toys from jumble sales etc. We weren't poor - father was a middle-ranking civil servant and we lived in a nice London suburb - but that was just the way things were. Then in the 80s it all started to change and I remember some of the nouveau-riches boys at school (whose fathers were estate agents and other dodgy dealers) starting to mock anybody who didn't wear 'designer' stuff etc. It was the era of 'casuals' at football matches and all that nonsense.

I'm not too sure about this 'spiritual' stuff though. The Chinese and the Americans could be said to be more 'spiritual' than the British (or at least, more interested in organised religion) but I'm pretty sure they have the same amount of tat. I think it's more to do with the replacement of primary and secondary industries by tertiary industries which require huge amounts of consumerism, marketing, culture of envy etc.

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Who wants to be a walking sandwich board? I would expect to be paid.

Quite......it has been known to wear a jumper inside out, more stylish than showing a common logo......better to be an unique individual than a sheep like follower who has to wear and copy what others do. ;)

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IMHO 'competition' over consumer goods is only part of what is making our kids so miserable.

In school they are told what they are supposed to think on a lot of issues that they should be left to make their own mind up.

'Controlling' show-off parents seem to be on the increase, many of them the product of controlling parents themselves.. At the other end of the spectrum we also have an increase in the number of parents that don't give a toss.

Then we have this culture where it's the norm to analyse, judge and sneer at other people. Clothes, homes, cars, looks, body... You only have to look at the most popular magazines and their contents. Nasty voyeuristic, jealous, misery making tripe.

Edited by mitchbux

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Yes! I grew up in the late 70s/early 80s on the cusp of the end of the good old days and the beginning of the consumerist era. For most of my childhood everything had to be scrimped and saved for, second hand bicycle as a present for birthday AND Christmas, toys from jumble sales etc. We weren't poor - father was a middle-ranking civil servant and we lived in a nice London suburb - but that was just the way things were. Then in the 80s it all started to change and I remember some of the nouveau-riches boys at school (whose fathers were estate agents and other dodgy dealers) starting to mock anybody who didn't wear 'designer' stuff etc. It was the era of 'casuals' at football matches and all that nonsense.

I'm not too sure about this 'spiritual' stuff though. The Chinese and the Americans could be said to be more 'spiritual' than the British (or at least, more interested in organised religion) but I'm pretty sure they have the same amount of tat. I think it's more to do with the replacement of primary and secondary industries by tertiary industries which require huge amounts of consumerism, marketing, culture of envy etc.

What it actually reveals to you is the power of the brainwashing effects of TV advertising and programs influencing your life choices (esp thru peer-pressure) as they expanded non-BBC channels and cable-sky becoming available (in exactly that time scale)

I wore second hand clothes like loads of others (pass-me-down shirts) till I was around 15

I can also remember the exact time when rip-off marketeers in this country doubled the prices of working mens jeans such as Levi-Wrangler overnight with their hyped up bullshite marketing turning jeans into a 'fashion' item.

The rip-off jean retailer monopoly in Europe lobby UK Govt and Euro Parliament to pass laws to keep resellers from buying in self-imported cheaper 'grey market' jeans where they are sold at affordable 'real' prices

Jeans can still be bought in countries around the World as working mens gear such as USA where they are less than half the price they are in the UK

They take our cash off us as well trained 'mugged' mugs

Edited by erranta

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Quite......it has been known to wear a jumper inside out, more stylish than showing a common logo......better to be an unique individual than a sheep like follower who has to wear and copy what others do. ;)

That's me then, literally. The only item of clothing I've got with a company logo is the Black Sheep Brewery.

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Then we have this culture where it's the norm to analyse, judge and sneer at other people. Clothes, homes, cars, looks, body... You only have to look at the most popular magazines and their contents. Nasty voyeuristic, jealous, misery making tripe.

The real feral rats.

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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