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bewildered_renter

Viewed A Seriously Manky Flat In Cardiff

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I'm looking to move (rental again) as my landlord isn't paying the service charge.

Anyway, went to view a place yesterday in The Aspect. Should have been wonderful, 11th floor, facing over Cardiff so good for sunlight and several free fireworks displays a year.

The reatlity was...

The corridor smelt really foul, can't quite put my finger on what it was. Toss up between rancid fat and damp (and the latter would be seriously bad news.)

Flat was filthy, stains on the furniture, pubes in the bathroom, lord knows what in the kitchen.

I'm sure they could sort the flat itself with £50 or so to get it cleaned, but I couldn't help wondering how depressed I would feel each time I came home to the foul smell in the corridor.

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I did not work on that place but the likes of the altolusso were badly constructed the rendered outer skin is basically rock wool boards [very absorbent] covered with a polymer or silicone based render with a acrylic based top/colour coat ,so any slight crack/defect will result in the out side skin of the building becoming a giant sponge.

So I would not be surprised if the smell was damp,the thing I can not believe is that the render system only has a 25 year life span /guarantee ,which is only valid if very strict application guide lines were adhered to and in most casese`s they were not ,so 10-15 years down the line how dose any one prove they were? I believe they have built the slums of the future and buy the sound of it it may already be here

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I did not work on that place but the likes of the altolusso were badly constructed the rendered outer skin is basically rock wool boards [very absorbent] covered with a polymer or silicone based render with a acrylic based top/colour coat ,so any slight crack/defect will result in the out side skin of the building becoming a giant sponge.

So I would not be surprised if the smell was damp,the thing I can not believe is that the render system only has a 25 year life span /guarantee ,which is only valid if very strict application guide lines were adhered to and in most casese`s they were not ,so 10-15 years down the line how dose any one prove they were? I believe they have built the slums of the future and buy the sound of it it may already be here

How widespread do you think this kind of thing is? Were many flats built in a similar way?

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I did not work on that place but the likes of the altolusso were badly constructed the rendered outer skin is basically rock wool boards [very absorbent] covered with a polymer or silicone based render with a acrylic based top/colour coat ,so any slight crack/defect will result in the out side skin of the building becoming a giant sponge.

So I would not be surprised if the smell was damp,the thing I can not believe is that the render system only has a 25 year life span /guarantee ,which is only valid if very strict application guide lines were adhered to and in most casese`s they were not ,so 10-15 years down the line how dose any one prove they were? I believe they have built the slums of the future and buy the sound of it it may already be here

Your final sentence is something I've begun to think too. I did spend a few years living in Landmark place, very enjoyable, but a few months back I was chatting to the guy who owned the Spar store, and asked if it was still a nice place to live. His response was "Well I don't live here anymore." That and his following comments gave me the impression that he meant to say "Well, I wouldn't live here."

How widespread do you think this kind of thing is? Were many flats built in a similar way?

At a guess, going on external appearance, and I could be wrong, I would suspect Admiral, Altolusso, Landmark, and St Davids 2.

And Landmark did have the problem of the exploding soil stacks too. Round about 2004/2005 I'd started to notice that every so often the lift would arrive and be full of sodden carpets that were being removed. And then it happened to me, summer of 2006.

A dark patch on the carpet in the corner, which carried on spreading. It was Saturday too, so the concierge said nothing would be done until the Monday. By Sunday afternoon it had spread across most of the flat and splashed when I walked, so I put as much of my stuff as I could onto every available raised surface and decamped to a hotel.

As I understand it, where the soil pipes pass though the floors they were encased in concrete. So, when the building moved, the pipes would flex. And eventually fail.

Lovely.

As an aside, the replacement laminated flooring in the kitchen was the actual water restistant kind that was specced, as opposed to the stuff that swelled and split with the slightest drop of water that was originally fitted.

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How widespread do you think this kind of thing is? Were many flats built in a similar way?

It is wide spread not just on the flats but a lot of the hospitals that have been built recently were constructed using the same system.

It is a cheap way to meet the thermal insulation that is now required without a cavity wall ,they basically use a plaster board stud wall on the inside with the studs fixed to block work usually thermalite {which are very absorbent } and then the rock wool boards are pinned to the block work then a mesh over that then the render system.

So if you see the new flats with a coloured/white render just give it a tap with your knuckles it will sound hollow

Edited by long time lurking

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It is wide spread not just on the flats but a lot of the hospitals that have been built recently were constructed using the same system.

It is a cheap way to meet the thermal insulation that is now required without a cavity wall ,they basically use a plaster board stud wall on the inside with the studs fixed to block work usually thermalite {which are very absorbent } and then the rock wool boards are pinned to the block work then a mesh over that then the render system.

So if you see the new flats with a coloured/white render just give it a tap with your knuckles it will sound hollow

Thanks - worth knowing.

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It is wide spread not just on the flats but a lot of the hospitals that have been built recently were constructed using the same system.

It is a cheap way to meet the thermal insulation that is now required without a cavity wall ,they basically use a plaster board stud wall on the inside with the studs fixed to block work usually thermalite {which are very absorbent } and then the rock wool boards are pinned to the block work then a mesh over that then the render system.

So if you see the new flats with a coloured/white render just give it a tap with your knuckles it will sound hollow

Is the rock wool boards + mesh + render system the same one sometimes used to insulate solid walls of existing properties?

If so, how finicky does the application have to be to actually be any good?

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Is the rock wool boards + mesh + render system the same one sometimes used to insulate solid walls of existing properties?

If so, how finicky does the application have to be to actually be any good?

Yes it is basically the same system,a lot of local authority housing are being done with the system in south wales at the moment.

The main difference is that the outer skin off the existing houses are water proof and it is a good system for its insulation values,and it`s not the end of the world if you get a leak/crack as the wall it is fixed to is generally waterproof.

But in my opinion the system used on the new build flats is a bad thing as it`s fixed to a porous wall so any leak goes straight through the wall leaving just half to three quarters of a inch plaster board and a couple of inches of air between you and a wet wall

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You can see them building some apartments in Huddersfield using this system, Riverside Place (I think) in Chapel Hill on the old Sellars factory site, next to the (buried) canal and River Colne. They have been at it for years, in the same time frame in London they have almost built The Shard!

What I don't understand is why both ends of the building are still open to the elements, especially with winter fast approaching.

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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