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TheCountOfNowhere

Troll Locked Up !

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http://news.sky.com/portal/site/skynews/menuitem.ee7913f6661fec1eb2221910413071a0/?vgnextoid=37a9c388bc262310VgnVCM1000005d04170aRCRD&vgnextchannel=805b17a021297110VgnVCM1000009811d20aRCRD#commentForm

"Memorial Site Cyber Bully Sent To Prison"

"A man has been jailed for posting vicious messages on memorial sites for dead teenagers"

it's not the nicest thing to do but should you be locked up for it ?

I'm amazed at this, unless there is more to it.

I have a sneaky suspicion that the powers that be really don't like the internet and there will be many more reported cases of people being locked up for saying "stuff" or acting like an online idiot. Just my opinion, hopefully I wont be locked up for expressing it.

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http://news.sky.com/portal/site/skynews/menuitem.ee7913f6661fec1eb2221910413071a0/?vgnextoid=37a9c388bc262310VgnVCM1000005d04170aRCRD&vgnextchannel=805b17a021297110VgnVCM1000009811d20aRCRD#commentForm

"Memorial Site Cyber Bully Sent To Prison"

"A man has been jailed for posting vicious messages on memorial sites for dead teenagers"

it's not the nicest thing to do but should you be locked up for it ?

I'm amazed at this, unless there is more to it.

I have a sneaky suspicion that the powers that be really don't like the internet and there will be many more reported cases of people being locked up for saying "stuff" or acting like an online idiot. Just my opinion, hopefully I wont be locked up for expressing it.

Hard to have sympathy for him though. Funny that, he actually LOOK's like a troll! Oops, that's got to be worth 7 days (suspended)!

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Lets hope Gordon Brown never visits hpc, if he does a lots of us will be in deep trouble :lol:

The internet represents the last real freedom we have left, naturally the Govt. doesn't like it.

Doesn't the US now have a kill switch for both mobile networks and the internet?

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Free speech cannot be tolerated mein furher.

The problem is that if "society" lets morons like that get away with it, individuals would have to take the law into their own hands, and that is a very slippery slope.

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Rather sick - however jail ?!

On a similar note - why exactly has Len McCluskey - head of Unite - not been arrested for inciting a riot ?

Unite Chief

"I don't think we can rule anything out,"

"urged a campaign of strikes and civil disobedience to fight government cuts"

"The actions that will be taken will be widespread and I don't think we can rule anything out. "

If some drunk 16 year old in Scotland can be - for posting some Faceboook message simply posting Glasgow Riot Friday 12th August 2011 - then McCluskey has clearly gone way past that, IMO, in terms of 'inciting' anything.

16 year old Glasgiow

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Lets hope Gordon Brown never visits hpc, if he does a lots of us will be in deep trouble :lol:

maybe he is already a member !!!!

It's a bit of a funny case this one and I think there is probably more too it.. I've noticed Sky News becoming more and more tabloid like recently.

Maybe government need to give web-users clear guidelines what we are allowed to say....and think :lol:

As far as I am concerned posting on the internet, in a forum for instance, is akin to standing on Speakers Corner in Hyde park on a Sunday ranting to anyone that will listen. You can say what you like there and nothing ever happens....you might want to come this Sunday and here my HPC rant :lol:

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Lets hope Gordon Brown never visits hpc, if he does a lots of us will be in deep trouble :lol:

The internet represents the last real freedom we have left, naturally the Govt. doesn't like it.

Doesn't the US now have a kill switch for both mobile networks and the internet?

FaceBookCrime..

Actually, I suspect that the use of social networking in the Arab Spring uprisings has put the wind up a lot of our more authoritarian-minded politicians and establishment. That and the general fear and loathing that the over 60s always have for any technology/culture used by young people..

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Rather sick - however jail ?!

On a similar note - why exactly has Len McCluskey - head of Unite - not been arrested for inciting a riot ?

Unite Chief

"I don't think we can rule anything out,"

"urged a campaign of strikes and civil disobedience to fight government cuts"

"The actions that will be taken will be widespread and I don't think we can rule anything out. "

If some drunk 16 year old in Scotland can be - for posting some Faceboook message simply posting Glasgow Riot Friday 12th August 2011 - then McCluskey has clearly gone way past that, IMO, in terms of 'inciting' anything.

16 year old Glasgiow

It's a fair point. Perhaps it's down to the communication media used, or the size of the audience? Maybe you should make a formal complaint about his behaviour?

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It's a bit of a funny case this one and I think there is probably more too it.. I've noticed Sky News becoming more and more tabloid like recently.

I've given up on Sky News, the stock market ticker of late planted under their logo was the final straw for me.

Still if the Express could have such a thing no doubt it would be the HPI, nothing else matters but the price of a lousy house.

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The problem is that if "society" lets morons like that get away with it, individuals would have to take the law into their own hands, and that is a very slippery slope.

I don't disagree with you but what we should all be scared about is that we are supposed to live in a nation of free speech.

Did you know about the particular law they used to jail the guy? When those in power make laws without informing people we know the political system is not a democracy anymore.

What can I write without fear of being to jail? Can I criticise the government? A past government? A friend of the government? Can I say Murdoch is a swine?

The truth is, I don't know and I'm sure neither do most people.

With the associated propaganda of people being sent to jail for jsut being morons it just cowers people into being quiet.

Big brother is watching us.

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That's a lot more lenient a punishment than would probably be handed out by a grieving parent.

Perhaps - but that is not really how things work - is it ?

People say nasty sick things about dead people all the time. We either allow it or we don't. Picking and choosing what is 'ok' is a path to all sorts of shit IMO.

It's a fair point. Perhaps it's down to the communication media used, or the size of the audience? Maybe you should make a formal complaint about his behaviour?

If I did that about everything it would be a full time job !!

Just pointing out the different rules in this country for different people. This bloke is the head of an organisation of over a million people. Yet he can say stuff like this on BBC and nothing happens - yet a 16 year old in Glasgow gets arrested for putting some random comment on Facebook.

George Orwell would be proud. Or ******ing shocked that what he foresaw has actually come true.

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People say nasty sick things about dead people all the time. We either allow it or we don't. Picking and choosing what is 'ok' is a path to all sorts of shit IMO.

We saw the rule book thrown out the window with those rioters, Kangaroo courts, sentences for nowt crimes, etc.

What's next, prison for dropping a sweet wrapper, or does it all depend where the sweet wrapper is dropped?

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Perhaps - but that is not really how things work - is it ?

People say nasty sick things about dead people all the time. We either allow it or we don't. Picking and choosing what is 'ok' is a path to all sorts of shit IMO.

Isn't that what courts are for?

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We saw the rule book thrown out the window with those rioters, Kangaroo courts, sentences for nowt crimes, etc.

What's next, prison for dropping a sweet wrapper, or does it all depend where the sweet wrapper is dropped?

Seems more and more subjective.

To cut through the stuff, what on earth was the charge, or law he broke?

Not on the story yet - although it is being updated. Says the max sentence was given which was the 18 weeks. Think I will just wait to see what Sky say rather than doing the detective work myself.

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Isn't that what courts are for?

In theory yes. However as others have pointed out - with the recent riots - it seems they just decided to do what the hell they wanted.

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To cut through the stuff, what on earth was the charge, or law he broke?

United Kingdom citizens have a negative right to freedom of expression under the common law.

You can say whatever you like except, incitement to racial hatred, incitement to religious hatred, incitement to terrorism,

encouragement of terrorism, dissemination of terrorist publications, glorifying terrorism,

collection or possession of information likely to be of use to a terrorist,

threatening, abusive, or insulting speech or behavior,

treason including imagining the death of the monarch, sedition,obscenity,indecency including corruption of public morals and outraging public decency,

defamation, prior restraint, restrictions on court reporting including names of victims and evidence and prejudicing or interfering with court proceedings,

prohibition of post-trial interviews with jurors scandalizing the court by criticising or murmuring judges, time, manner, and place restrictions,

harassment, privileged communications, trade secrets, classified material, copyright, patents, military conduct, limitations on commercial speech

such as advertising.

People of a similiar mind, [even by meeting online] can be regarded as Serious Criminals, according to The 1997 Police Act, because we dare participate in '...conduct by a number of persons in pursuit of a common purpose...'

The police are seeking powers to shut down websites deemed to be engaged in “criminal” activity.

The Serious and Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) has tabled a plan for Nominet, which oversees .uk web addresses, to be given the domain closing power.

Nominet said the idea was only a proposal and invited people to join the debate on the form of the final policy.

IT lawyers said the proposal would be “worrying” if it led to websites going offline without judicial oversight.

“It’s not policy at this stage,” said Eleanor Bradley, director of operations at Nominet.

Nick Lockett, a lawyer at DLL specialising in computer law, said he was “deeply concerned” about SOCA’s proposal if it meant it could act before a conviction had been secured.

“In a world of online retailing, the ability for a police officer to seize any business, whether that is blocking a domain or seizing the servers - pre-conviction or certainly pre-warrant - would be a dramatic change in the relationship between the police and the internet community,” he told BBC News.

He also said the police would have to be very careful about the sites they judged to be engaged in criminal activity. Mistakes that resulted in shutting down a legitimate site would leave them open to claims for “massive damages” he warned.

Secretary of State Peter Mandelson introduced changes to the Digital Economy Bill. These changes gave the Secretary of State (Mandelson -- and successor's) the power to make "secondary legislation" (legislation that is passed without debate) to amend the provisions of Copyright, Designs and Patents Act (1988).

What that means is that an unelected official would have the power to do anything without Parliamentary oversight or debate, provided it was done in the name of protecting copyright.

The Secretary of State would get the power to create new remedies for online infringements (for example, he could create jail terms for file-sharing, or create a "three-strikes" plan that costs entire families their internet access if any member stands accused of infringement)

The Secretary of State would get the power to "impose such duties, powers or functions on any person as may be specified in connection with facilitating online infringement" (for example, ISPs could be forced to spy on their users, or to have copyright lawyers examine every piece of user-generated content before it goes live; also, copyright "militias" can be formed with the power to police copyright on the web) It's a declaration of war against the principles of free speech, privacy, freedom of assembly, the presumption of innocence, and competition.

This proposal creates unlimited power to appoint militias who are above the law, who can pry into every corner of your life, who can disconnect you from your family, job, education and government, who can fine you or put you in jail.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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